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NEWS
By San Francisco Chronicle | September 11, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The Association of Trial Lawyers of America, along with a number of consumer groups, scored a major Senate victory by narrowly defeating an attempt to move a product-liability reform bill toward a floor vote.The Product Liability Fairness Act, the latest in more than a decade of such efforts, would have altered the rules governing lawsuits alleging product defects. One provision would have disallowed punitive damages for alleged product-caused injuries unless the manufacturer displayed a "conscious, flagrant indifference" to safety.
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | April 29, 2003
In a move to strengthen its product liability and mass tort litigation practices, Miles & Stockbridge PC said yesterday that it has agreed to acquire Baltimore law firm Church Loker & Silver. The smaller firm's 10 lawyers will join Miles & Stockbridge on May 1, bringing the number of attorneys at the combined firm to 179, including a 40-member litigation team. Church Loker & Silver, established in 1989 as Church & Houff, specializes in defending companies in asbestos cases, as well as in tobacco and lead-paint litigation.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 10, 1995
WASHINGTON -- After two weeks of contentious negotiations to fashion a measure intended to limit the number of civil lawsuits in the nation, the Senate settled yesterday on a bill remarkably like the relatively narrow measure it took up when the process began.In a voice vote, the Senate approved an amendment that would limit the amount of punitive damages that juries may award, but only in cases involving faulty products. The Senate is expected to pass the measure today.If the Senate bill passes, it would mean that for the first time both houses of Congress have agreed to set nationwide standards in some lawsuits brought to recover damages for civil wrongs.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | March 13, 2003
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- If there is any mystery remaining three weeks after the heatstroke death of Orioles pitcher Steve Bechler, it likely will be explained this afternoon when the Broward County medical examiner, Dr. Joshua Perper, releases the final toxicology report and microscopic tissue analysis from the Feb. 19 autopsy. The toxicology report is expected to confirm Bechler ingested the controversial weight-loss aid and stimulant ephedrine before he collapsed at the Orioles' spring training complex on Feb. 16 and died the next day. The tissue analysis also could reveal factors that may have contributed to the death.
BUSINESS
By Sylvia Porter and Sylvia Porter,1991 Los Angeles Times Syndicate Times Mirror Square Los Angeles, Calif. 90053 | March 18, 1991
An industry in which the United States was the undisputed leader for half a century has been all but abandoned in this country. You may not want to mourn that, but you should. Next time it could be your industry, your job, your welfare.In 1978, American builders of general aviation aircraft -- small private and business airplanes -- built about 18,000 planes. In 1988, those manufacturers built 1,143 airplanes.Indeed, in 1986 the Cessna Company, an industry leader for decades, announced it was stopping its manufacture of light single-engine airplanes of the sort you see in the sky every day. Meanwhile, prices of used airplanes were skyrocketing.
NEWS
By Dina ElBoghdady and Dunstan McNichol and Dina ElBoghdady and Dunstan McNichol,States News Service | September 9, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Tammy Callas of Laurel had her first run-in with product liability issues when she found that her Dow Corning breast implants were leaking chemicals into her body.The leaks caused Mrs. Callas, a mother of two, to develop rheumatoid arthritis, an eye and mouth disease called Sjodren, a thyroid condition, muscle weakness and memory loss, she said. To combat the illnesses, she must undergo chemotherapy for the rest of her life."We had a lot of big plans and dreams," said Mrs. Callas' husband, George.
NEWS
March 22, 1996
WHO SAID THIS? "I think the president has served the nation in a very ill fashion by saying he's going to veto a very balanced product liability bill. . . Twice when he was governor [of Arkansas] President Clinton voted for uniform standards of product liability. In those days he was a professor of law. I think these days he's become a professor of rather raw politics."Answer: Sen. Jay Rockefeller, Democrat of West Virginia, with an 85 percent support record for administration proposals in 1995.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 10, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Senate Democrats blocked legislation yesterday that would have shielded small businesses from crippling product liability lawsuits, complaining that Republicans would not let them influence the bill even as GOP leaders were slipping in their own pet provisions.At the heart of the dispute were Democratic efforts to attach to the legislation a measure expanding the rights of patients in managed care companies -- a provision that Republicans oppose.Democrats were divided over the merits of the product liability bill, which would have restricted punitive damages in lawsuits over defective products and which had the grudging support of the White House.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | April 29, 2003
In a move to strengthen its product liability and mass tort litigation practices, Miles & Stockbridge PC said yesterday that it has agreed to acquire Baltimore law firm Church Loker & Silver. The smaller firm's 10 lawyers will join Miles & Stockbridge on May 1, bringing the number of attorneys at the combined firm to 179, including a 40-member litigation team. Church Loker & Silver, established in 1989 as Church & Houff, specializes in defending companies in asbestos cases, as well as in tobacco and lead-paint litigation.
NEWS
By Robert Kuttner | June 24, 1994
ONE of the epic corporate public relations ploys of our time is now pending before the U.S. Senate. And it could well succeed.This is the crusade by organized business to make it harder for citizens to win damages when they are maimed by dangerous products or bynegligent doctors.This crusade calls itself "product liability reform" or "tort reform." Under the common law, a tort is a wrongful act that allows a plaintiff to sue for damages.For more than a decade, America's biggest businesses have painted a lurid picture of an overlawyered, overlitigated economy.
NEWS
July 17, 2000
Steven P. Lockman, 56, product liability lawyer Steven P. Lockman, a lawyer who specialized in product liability and was an active supporter of his alma mater, the University of Maryland School of Law, died Saturday at Johns Hopkins Hospital of complications of an aortic aneurysm. He was 56. Mr. Lockman grew up in Baltimore and was a graduate of City College. He worked for the Washington firm of Arnold & Porter, where he helped to settle a national class action lawsuit against the makers of fen-phen, a drug combination used by thousands of people who hoped to lose weight.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 10, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Senate Democrats blocked legislation yesterday that would have shielded small businesses from crippling product liability lawsuits, complaining that Republicans would not let them influence the bill even as GOP leaders were slipping in their own pet provisions.At the heart of the dispute were Democratic efforts to attach to the legislation a measure expanding the rights of patients in managed care companies -- a provision that Republicans oppose.Democrats were divided over the merits of the product liability bill, which would have restricted punitive damages in lawsuits over defective products and which had the grudging support of the White House.
NEWS
By Howard A. Janet | March 6, 1998
RECENT news accounts have revealed that the U.S. Chamber of Commerce -- Washington's largest business lobbying group -- and national Republican Party leaders are about to declare war on trial lawyers.An integral part of the chamber's battle plan is a multimillion-dollar, negative advertising blitz. The GOP leadership plans to launch its own attack. According to a reported Republican source, "We'll unleash an attack on the trial lawyers never seen before."Speaker Newt Gingrich has already informed GOP leaders that attacking trial lawyers is a top priority this election year.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 17, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The tobacco industry and its opponents are trying to negotiate a $300 billion settlement that could close courthouses across the nation to lawsuits from smokers and place severe restrictions on cigarette advertising.Reports of the deal, a major element of which would require the consent of Congress, drew skeptical reactions yesterday from Capitol Hill and anti-smoking activists.Face-to-face talks between anti-smoking forces and several states on one side and top-level cigarette company executives on the other -- the first bargaining the industry has ever been willing to do on its legal risks -- have reached an "intense" level in the past three weeks, said Mississippi Attorney General Mike Moore, a leader in the negotiations.
NEWS
By Scott Higham and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF | September 4, 1996
Regrouping after a devastating ruling in the Norplant product liability case, 15 women from Maryland have filed a lawsuit in federal court in Baltimore, claiming they suffered through a series of medical maladies from the surgically implanted device.The suit is part of a flurry of cases that lawyers say will be filed in federal courthouses around the country. Last month, a U.S. judge in Texas denied class-action status to more than 50,000 women who say the device caused blurred vision, moods swings and other medical woes.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney | June 2, 1996
IN A CASE involving a BMW damaged in shipping, then repainted and sold as new, the Supreme Court on May 20 gave the political right one of its fondest wishes -- tougher, but still unclear, limits on punitive damages in product-liability cases.Business has complained that the prospect of punitive awards like the $4 million an Alabama court awarded in BMW of North America v. Gore stifled innovation, especially drug research.Consumer activists say punitive awards were never a threat to any but the most flagrant lawbreakers -- notably asbestos companies -- so they insist the case will change little, especially in Maryland, whose law makes it harder to get punitive awards than almost any other state.
NEWS
April 13, 1996
Liability reform is anti-consumer"The Common Sense Products Liability Legal Reform Act of 1996." Don't be fooled by its soothing name. This law will destroy consumer rights for the convenient protection of powerful business interests.In its March 22 editorial The Sun, avoiding all effort to analyze the 70-page Act, summarily announced the proposed legislation "good for America" and necessary to end frivolous product liability suits. It then asserts President Clinton bowed to the power of trial lawyers when he threatened to veto the legislation.
NEWS
May 11, 1996
Product liability law is good for AmericaIn his April 13 rejoinder, "Liability reform is anti-consumer," Laurence A. Marder criticizes The Sun for "avoiding all effort to analyze the 70-page [Common Sense Product Liability Legal Reform Act]" in its March 22 editorial endorsement of the bill. He denounces The Sun's support of the bill as "a disservice" to injured persons. As a wholesaler-distributor of electrical supplies, an employer and a consumer of commercial products, I, like The Sun, take a much different view and support this legislation.
NEWS
May 11, 1996
Product liability law is good for AmericaIn his April 13 rejoinder, "Liability reform is anti-consumer," Laurence A. Marder criticizes The Sun for "avoiding all effort to analyze the 70-page [Common Sense Product Liability Legal Reform Act]" in its March 22 editorial endorsement of the bill. He denounces The Sun's support of the bill as "a disservice" to injured persons. As a wholesaler-distributor of electrical supplies, an employer and a consumer of commercial products, I, like The Sun, take a much different view and support this legislation.
NEWS
April 13, 1996
Liability reform is anti-consumer"The Common Sense Products Liability Legal Reform Act of 1996." Don't be fooled by its soothing name. This law will destroy consumer rights for the convenient protection of powerful business interests.In its March 22 editorial The Sun, avoiding all effort to analyze the 70-page Act, summarily announced the proposed legislation "good for America" and necessary to end frivolous product liability suits. It then asserts President Clinton bowed to the power of trial lawyers when he threatened to veto the legislation.
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