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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | December 4, 1998
The Producers Club of Maryland recently announced the recipient of its second annual Producers Club of Maryland Fellowship.Rodrigo Garcia, a cinematographer who has photographed "Mi Vida Loca" and "Four Rooms," among others, received $10,000 to help bring his directorial debut script, "Things You Can Tell Just By Looking at Her," to fruition.The Producers Club of Maryland, which was created by Jed Dietz in 1993 to help the Maryland Film Office promote the state as a filmmaking location, began awarding the fellowship two years ago in partnership with the Sundance Institute, a nonprofit organization founded by Robert Redford in 1981.
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By Ann Hornaday and Chris Kaltenbach and Ann Hornaday and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | May 12, 2000
Hot on the heels of its stellar second edition, the Maryland Film Festival will sponsor a between-festivals event May 19. "Things You Can Tell Just by Looking at Her," a romantic comedy directed by Rodrigo Garcia, will be shown at Johns Hopkins University's Shriver Hall at 7: 30 p.m. Garcia, who will introduce the movie and answer questions afterward, will have just returned from the Cannes Film Festival, where the film is being shown. The Baltimore screening is a homecoming of sorts for the project, which received crucial early funding from the Maryland Producers Club in 1998.
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FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Chris Kaltenbach and Ann Hornaday and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | May 12, 2000
Hot on the heels of its stellar second edition, the Maryland Film Festival will sponsor a between-festivals event May 19. "Things You Can Tell Just by Looking at Her," a romantic comedy directed by Rodrigo Garcia, will be shown at Johns Hopkins University's Shriver Hall at 7: 30 p.m. Garcia, who will introduce the movie and answer questions afterward, will have just returned from the Cannes Film Festival, where the film is being shown. The Baltimore screening is a homecoming of sorts for the project, which received crucial early funding from the Maryland Producers Club in 1998.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | December 4, 1998
The Producers Club of Maryland recently announced the recipient of its second annual Producers Club of Maryland Fellowship.Rodrigo Garcia, a cinematographer who has photographed "Mi Vida Loca" and "Four Rooms," among others, received $10,000 to help bring his directorial debut script, "Things You Can Tell Just By Looking at Her," to fruition.The Producers Club of Maryland, which was created by Jed Dietz in 1993 to help the Maryland Film Office promote the state as a filmmaking location, began awarding the fellowship two years ago in partnership with the Sundance Institute, a nonprofit organization founded by Robert Redford in 1981.
NEWS
June 28, 1993
If Baltimoreans want more movies filmed in their city, they ought to consider joining the Producers Club. This is a new non-profit group whose aim is to actively market Baltimore and Maryland as a site for Hollywood productions. It aims to step in when government efforts to lure movie-makers here isn't enough.A recent premier of "Sleepless in Seattle" at the Senator Theatre marked the start of Producers Club events. Anyone who joins (annual fee: $500) gets to attend gala movie openings, dine with top cinema producers and stars, visit local on-site film productions and receive invitations to Hollywood events.
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | June 28, 1996
A "Welcome to Bawlmer, Hon" party seemed a perfect way to welcome the cast and crew of "Washington Square" to town. You can expect to see movie cameras rolling through mid-August. In this film, Baltimore doubles for New York City circa 1850.The party was given by the Producers Club, a private non-profit group which helps the Maryland Film Commission attract film and television productions to Maryland. One of the perks of membership is to be invited to parties like this one held at City Life Museums.
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | July 17, 1994
Nothing like a good, old-fashioned Maryland crab feast to get the cast and crew of "Homicide" back into their Baltimore mode.Ned Beatty, Richard Belzer, Yaphet Kotto, Andre Braugher, Daniel (of the well-known acting family) Baldwin and Clark Johnson were among the stars of the series who came to the rooftop party on the Fells Point Recreation Pier. If chemistry has anything to do with a success, this NBC series should go great guns. I noticed a lot of affectionate greetings among the returning cast and crew.
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | February 24, 1995
The Producers Club of Maryland selected the National Aquarium as the place to entertain all its VIP visitors, who are in town as part of the cast and crew of the Jodie Foster film "Home for the Holidays." The Producers Club threw the party in an effort to get the message across that Maryland will go out of its way to get moviemakers to film here, which, in the long run, pumps millions of dollars into Maryland's economy.I heard Academy Award winner Anne Bancroft; Claire Danes, star of "Little Women;" Dylan McDermott, of "Young Guns"; Charlie Chaplin's daughter Geraldine Chaplin, of "Nashville" and Charles Durning, who appeared this week in the NBC mini-series "A Woman of Independent Means," were among cast members, who took in the puffin feeding and lecture in the rain forest or, perhaps, went on a tour over the shark tank with shark keeper Juan Sabalones.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | June 17, 1993
If you get a thrill whenever you see Maryland locations in movies and you have $500 to spare, Jed Dietz has a deal for you.Mr. Dietz, general partner of a film investment partnership, has launched The Producers Club, a nonprofit group formed solely to lure movie companies and their dollars to Maryland.Perhaps the first such effort in the country, the club charges each member $500 to promote Maryland as the place to make movies. In return, the members get a chance to hobnob with film industry celebrities and attend premieres and private screenings.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 23, 1998
For some filmgoers, the 1998 edition of the Sundance Film Festival will be remembered as the year rock-star-turned-clothes-horse Courtney Love succeeded in booting a film about her life with Kurt Cobain off the roster. For others, it will be remembered as the best organized and technically smooth festival in a very long time.More than 13,000 executives, filmmakers, fans and hangers-on have descended on Park City, Utah, for the 10-day festival, where features and documentaries compete for coveted awards and unknown filmmakers show their mettle; where studios pick up the next big thing dirt cheap (they hope)
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 23, 1998
For some filmgoers, the 1998 edition of the Sundance Film Festival will be remembered as the year rock-star-turned-clothes-horse Courtney Love succeeded in booting a film about her life with Kurt Cobain off the roster. For others, it will be remembered as the best organized and technically smooth festival in a very long time.More than 13,000 executives, filmmakers, fans and hangers-on have descended on Park City, Utah, for the 10-day festival, where features and documentaries compete for coveted awards and unknown filmmakers show their mettle; where studios pick up the next big thing dirt cheap (they hope)
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | June 28, 1996
A "Welcome to Bawlmer, Hon" party seemed a perfect way to welcome the cast and crew of "Washington Square" to town. You can expect to see movie cameras rolling through mid-August. In this film, Baltimore doubles for New York City circa 1850.The party was given by the Producers Club, a private non-profit group which helps the Maryland Film Commission attract film and television productions to Maryland. One of the perks of membership is to be invited to parties like this one held at City Life Museums.
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | July 28, 1995
The cast and crew of "Homicide" are back in town and have just begun shooting episodes for the fourth season of the NBC television series about life on the streets of Baltimore. Members of the Producers Club of Maryland welcomed them back with an old-fashioned picnic and crab feast last Sunday at the Evergreen Carriage House on North Charles Street.Reed Diamond, Melissa Leo, Kyle Secor and Richard Belzer were among the cast members participating in the summer ritual of eating hot steamed crabs on a hot steamy day. I, for one, have never seen the appeal, but it is a Baltimore tradition in many quarters.
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | February 24, 1995
The Producers Club of Maryland selected the National Aquarium as the place to entertain all its VIP visitors, who are in town as part of the cast and crew of the Jodie Foster film "Home for the Holidays." The Producers Club threw the party in an effort to get the message across that Maryland will go out of its way to get moviemakers to film here, which, in the long run, pumps millions of dollars into Maryland's economy.I heard Academy Award winner Anne Bancroft; Claire Danes, star of "Little Women;" Dylan McDermott, of "Young Guns"; Charlie Chaplin's daughter Geraldine Chaplin, of "Nashville" and Charles Durning, who appeared this week in the NBC mini-series "A Woman of Independent Means," were among cast members, who took in the puffin feeding and lecture in the rain forest or, perhaps, went on a tour over the shark tank with shark keeper Juan Sabalones.
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | September 23, 1994
Hot news from Los Angeles that has nothing to do with O.J. Simpson.Many have pondered what Gov. William Donald Schaefer will do when he's finally out of the political limelight. And it sounds like Linda Goldenberg, former Baltimorean now in Los Angeles as vice president of Public Relations for Morgan Creek Productions, may have found a new career for the guv. At an L.A. breakfast Tuesday, she announced Morgan Creek will be making six films next year and she was sure the governor would be in one of the films.
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | July 17, 1994
Nothing like a good, old-fashioned Maryland crab feast to get the cast and crew of "Homicide" back into their Baltimore mode.Ned Beatty, Richard Belzer, Yaphet Kotto, Andre Braugher, Daniel (of the well-known acting family) Baldwin and Clark Johnson were among the stars of the series who came to the rooftop party on the Fells Point Recreation Pier. If chemistry has anything to do with a success, this NBC series should go great guns. I noticed a lot of affectionate greetings among the returning cast and crew.
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | July 28, 1995
The cast and crew of "Homicide" are back in town and have just begun shooting episodes for the fourth season of the NBC television series about life on the streets of Baltimore. Members of the Producers Club of Maryland welcomed them back with an old-fashioned picnic and crab feast last Sunday at the Evergreen Carriage House on North Charles Street.Reed Diamond, Melissa Leo, Kyle Secor and Richard Belzer were among the cast members participating in the summer ritual of eating hot steamed crabs on a hot steamy day. I, for one, have never seen the appeal, but it is a Baltimore tradition in many quarters.
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | September 23, 1994
Hot news from Los Angeles that has nothing to do with O.J. Simpson.Many have pondered what Gov. William Donald Schaefer will do when he's finally out of the political limelight. And it sounds like Linda Goldenberg, former Baltimorean now in Los Angeles as vice president of Public Relations for Morgan Creek Productions, may have found a new career for the guv. At an L.A. breakfast Tuesday, she announced Morgan Creek will be making six films next year and she was sure the governor would be in one of the films.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | July 26, 1993
To Jed Dietz, movies are much more than light projected through celluloid strips. They can change lives. They changed his life."There is something about a movie that people saw when they were young that helped them through a crisis. When they are older, it helps them resolve an issue," he said.Mr. Dietz's issue was joining the "Dump Johnson" movement of the mid-1960s. "My interest in politics -- this is an outrageous thing to tell you -- started with "Mr. Smith goes to Washington." It was largely formed by that," he said.
NEWS
June 28, 1993
If Baltimoreans want more movies filmed in their city, they ought to consider joining the Producers Club. This is a new non-profit group whose aim is to actively market Baltimore and Maryland as a site for Hollywood productions. It aims to step in when government efforts to lure movie-makers here isn't enough.A recent premier of "Sleepless in Seattle" at the Senator Theatre marked the start of Producers Club events. Anyone who joins (annual fee: $500) gets to attend gala movie openings, dine with top cinema producers and stars, visit local on-site film productions and receive invitations to Hollywood events.
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