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By Charlyne Varkonyi | July 31, 1991
"Producers only" are the new buzzwords in farmers markets these days. Simply put, it means you should not be able to buy bananas or mangoes in one of these local markets unless a researcher has uncovered a miracle way to grow tropical fruit in the Chesapeake Bay climate.But, it seems that "producers only" can mean different things to different people.Case in point: Tracy Baskerville, public information officer for the Baltimore Office of Promotion, called us recently to ask why the Baltimore Farmers Market (Holliday and Saratoga streets under the JFX on Sunday mornings)
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
Cereal makers have long designed eye-catching boxes to lure children to supermarket breakfast aisles. Now, grocers and produce companies are turning to Big Bird and other "Sesame Street" characters in an effort to make fruits and vegetables just as appealing. An emerging national movement that uses the Muppets to market vegetables to preschoolers got a foothold in Baltimore last week when it was adopted by two area businesses — Mars Super Markets and Savage-based East Coast Fresh, a Mars vendor and processor of fresh-cut fruits and vegetables.
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FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and J. Wynn Rousuck | July 13, 2004
Broadway producers and actors reached a tentative agreement on a four-year contract yesterday, narrowly averting what would have been the second strike in less than 18 months. "The contract will serve our industry and theatergoers well, keeping Broadway strong in New York and creating more opportunities on the road," said a joint statement released by the Actors' Equity Association and the League of American Theatres and Producers. Details of the tentative agreement were not immediately available.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2014
A family-owned produce distributor has moved from Washington to a new base in Jessup, where its 80 employees work to package and transport more than 1 million pounds of tomatoes each week. Pete Pappas & Sons Inc., founded in 1942 in Washington as a tomato distributor, started operations in August at its 120,000-square-foot warehouse in Jessup, said Paul S. Pappas, general manager for the firm, which is in its fourth generation of family ownership. The larger property will allow the firm to expand into new types of produce from its tomato and berries, he said.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | November 15, 1990
The producers of ''Nick & Nora,'' the musical production that was to have played the Mechanic Theatre in March, were within $750,000 of the $5.5-million budget when they decided to postpone the project until next year.''It was very disappointing,'' said Hope Quackenbush, managing director of the Mechanic. ''It was a good project.''Quackenbush suspects that the trouble lies in the economy. ''There just isn't that much risk money out there,'' she said.''Nick & Nora'' is based on Dashiell Hammett's ''The Thin Man'' and was to have starred Barry Bostwick and Joanna Gleason.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | January 3, 1992
One of the producers of ''Nick and Nora,'' the musical that recently opened and closed on Broadway, was quoted as saying the reason he and the other producers didn't bring the show to Baltimore first (they had announced they would, then canceled) was because they didn't think Baltimore audiences were ''sophisticated enough'' to appreciate the musical comedy.Maybe yes, maybe no, but the producers of the show, which was based on the ''Thin Man'' characters of Dashiell Hammett's book, might have benefited from a tryout here.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | March 27, 2003
The thematic connection may be largely coincidental, but there's no denying the serendipity of opening the Hippodrome Performing Arts Center with the Baltimore-Washington premiere of The Producers, which will inaugurate the renovated theater with a five-week run beginning in February 2004. "The story of The Producers is so much what we want the story of the Hippodrome to be," explained Marks Chowning, the Hippodrome's newly appointed executive director. The Mel Brooks musical tells the tale of a conniving pair of producers who try to mount a deliberate flop, only to have it turn out to be a monster hit. "Here we are with a project, the Hippodrome, that everybody said would never get done," Chowning said, "and here's a show that's about something that's not going to succeed, that turns out to be a tremendous success.
FEATURES
By Casi Clocker and Casi Clocker,Contributing Writer | February 26, 1993
A drug dealer, a few black leather-clad punks and a cocaine addict were among the clientele at Henry and Jeff's bar on North Charles Street last Saturday morning. No, the bar hasn't changed its establishment from yuppy to seedy. Instead, it had become the site of Baltimore's latest film venture.The cast and crew of "Reflections of Evil," a Twilight Zone-like thriller, have spent the past couple of weekends at various Baltimore spots shooting a trailer for the film, a 10-minute segment that will be sent to film distributors and festivals to raise money for the full-length movie.
FEATURES
By Geraldine Fabrikant and Geraldine Fabrikant,New York Times News Service | November 29, 1994
In the television industry's first venture in which a broadcast network and an outside program producer would share advertising income and other revenue, Capital Cities/ABC Inc. agreed yesterday to form a jointly owned television production company with the Hollywood team of David Geffen, Jeffrey Katzenberg and Steven Spielberg."
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | June 4, 2001
"The Producers" produced the goods -- big time. The runaway hit musical about a scheme to make a fortune by mounting a deliberate flop proved the runaway winner at this year's -- or, for that matter, any year's -- Tony Awards. At last night's ceremony in New York, the stage adaptation of Mel Brooks' 1968 movie won a record 12 Tony Awards, more than any other show in Broadway history. The previous record was held by "Hello, Dolly!" which won 10 Tonys in 1964. Three of "The Producers' " Tonys -- for book, score and producing the show -- went to Brooks, the first time anyone has ever won three Tonys in a single season.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2014
Radio station WNST Friday laid off five employees including the general manager, a show producer and two on-airs hosts. Station founder Nestor Aparicio told the staff Friday morning.  Here's what Aparicio wrote of the five and their dismissals: Today, I announced the departure of several veteran folks - Drew Forrester, Glenn Clark, Ryan Chell and my office staff of general manager Paul Kopelke and Ashley Bishoff - in effort to...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2014
When Center Stage announced its 2014-2015 season months ago, there was one TBA on the schedule. The company announced Tuesday that the missing piece is the world premiere of "Marley," a musical about the Jamaican reggae sensation Bob Marley, written and directed by company artistic director Kwame Kwei-Armah. The new work, with a score comprised of Marley's music, will close the Center Stage season, running May 6 to June 14, 2015. "This will not be a jukebox musical," Kwei-Armah said.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2014
After his eighth-inning homer tied the game Wednesday night in the Orioles' eventual 5-2 win, Jonathan Schoop struggled to explain the magic that seems to be in his bat when he faces the New York Yankees. While Adam Jones' three-run blast -- the 12th of his 23th homers this season that has given the Orioles the lead -- was the difference in the game, Schoop's homer was monumental in the comeback. And in nine games against the Yankees this season, Schoop is hitting .380 (11-for-29)
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | July 28, 2014
Farmers Market Week begins Aug. 3, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and an independent public health organization wants consumers to remember a few things about food safety. Uncooked produce is twice as likely to make you sick than meat because fruits and vegetables can attract bacteria from the soil or water where it's grown, notes NSF International , citing data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Here are some tips from the group and from foodsafety.gov , a site maintained by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services: +Look for produce that isn't bruised or damaged.
SPORTS
By Alejandro Zuniga, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2014
Wei-Yin Chen surrendered home runs in back-to-back innings in the Orioles' 4-3 loss to the Oakland Athletics at Camden Yards on Friday, but his night was hardly a disappointment. Despite solo blasts by Josh Donaldson and Derek Norris in the first and second innings, respectively, the Orioles left-hander put himself in position to earn the win by shutting down one of baseball's most prolific offenses. He scattered five hits, struck out four and walked two before handing the ball to right-hander Darren O'Day with one out in the seventh inning.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2014
Producers and artists are quick to mythologize their roles in history.  J. Robbins would rather work.  As the frontman of the '90s post-punk band Jawbox, J. Robbins was a self-described “gung-ho touring maniac.” To the Silver Spring native, signing to the major label Atlantic Records and having the group's video for “Savory” played on MTV were accomplishments, but none were as rewarding as seeing the world. “I just loved to tour because I'd be like, 'Look where the band took me - we made it to the West Coast!
NEWS
January 22, 1999
REMEMBER those ads touting "the other white meat"? They've been very successful, as consumer demand for pork continues to grow and supermarket prices stay firm. But farmers who paid for the promotion are understandably unhappy -- hog prices hit a 50-year low last month and most producers are still selling their swine for half the cost of raising the animals.The nation's 115,000 pork producers have seen price drops of as much as 80 percent within a year. Political fallout from their financial toll threatens the success of the landmark Freedom to Farm Act of 1996, which steered national policy away from deep farm subsidies.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff writer | July 17, 1991
Producers of an upcoming national television show starring the former anchor of Fox TV's "A Current Affair" may launch their syndicated series in September with a story on the Gary Hart trial.The 2 1/2-week courtroom drama in Annapolis, which ended July 3 with a verdict of not guilty, featured sensational testimony that delved into the alleged victim's personal life. She was accused of working as a prostitute and having a mental disorder that made her fantasize about rape.That digging by defense lawyers has drawn criticism from the woman who accused Hart, a prominent real estate broker, and from the prosecutor, who called the tactics disgusting.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2014
If there's a heaven for horses, then California Chrome's great-great-grandsire will be peering down at Pimlico Race Course on Saturday to see whether his progeny can do what he did 50 years ago: win the Preakness and, with it, the first two legs of racing's Triple Crown. Even then, Northern Dancer ran as if he had wings. After smashing the track record in the Kentucky Derby, the stubby bay colt from Canada captured the 1964 Preakness by 21/4 lengths, pulling away in the stretch from his more classic-looking rivals.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2014
A severe thunderstorm could bring wind gusts of up to 60 miles per hour and quarter-sized hail this afternoon in the Baltimore area, the National Weather Service warned. The thunderstorm was moving east from Cockeysville and was expected to hit areas including Baltimore, Timonium and Bel Air. The NWS issued a severe thunderstorm warning at 1:20 p.m. that will expire at 2:15 p.m.
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