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Producer Price Index

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By New York Times News Service | April 12, 1995
WASHINGTON -- In an unexpectedly benign report, government figures showed yesterday that inflation vanished at the producer level in March, as both energy and food prices turned down.Not only was the price of finished products unchanged for the month, constituting the best performance since October, but goods at earlier stages of production also settled back to a pace that calmed jitters that had been developing from sharp price increases since late last year. March marked the end of the fourth year of economic recovery and expansion following the 1990-1991 recession.
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BUSINESS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | June 15, 2005
ATLANTA - Inflationary pressures eased in May as wholesale prices took the biggest dip in more than two years, the government reported yesterday. The Producer Price Index fell by a surprising 0.6 percent. In a separate report, the government said retail sales also declined by a bigger-than-expected 0.5 percent, although economists who noted lower gasoline costs said they did not see it as a sign of impending consumer weakness. In both cases, economists had forecast smaller declines. Neither report had much impact on Wall Street, where blue chip stocks were held aloft by a jump in the shares of auto companies, including General Motors Corp.
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BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | November 10, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Prices paid to factories, farmers and other producers fell as expected in October for the third time in five months as lower energy costs offset a jump in new car prices.The producer price index declined 0.1 percent last month, while the core rate of the PPI, which excludes often-volatile food and energy costs, was unchanged."There's no meaningful inflation out there," said Robert Dederick, a consulting economist at Northern Trust Co. in Chicago. The Federal Reserve "has nipped in the bud what was a worsening of inflation earlier this year," he said.
BUSINESS
February 13, 2005
A weekly briefing on the economic calendar Event of the week Wal-Mart earnings released Thursday. The world's largest retailer posted earnings of 63 cents per share in the fourth quarter of 2003; Morningstar.com estimates earnings at 73 cents per share for fourth-quarter 2004. Tuesday Retail sales for January; business inventories for December Earnings reports: Deere & Co., Fidelity National, MCI, Medco Health Solutions, Omnicom, Qwest, Westwood One, Abercrombie & Fitch, First Energy, Nordstrom Wednesday Housing starts and building permits for January; industrial production for January Earnings reports: Administaff, Caremark Rx, Coca-Cola, Cooper Tire, InterActiveCorp, Moody's, Wendy's, Hewlett- Packard, Medtronic Thursday Imort and export prices for January; leading indicators for January Earnings reports: E-Loan, First Health, Nextel, PG&E, RadioShack, Target, Wal-Mart, Nicor, Nvidia, Priceline.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | October 11, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Prices paid to U.S. factories, farmers and other producers rose a larger-than-expected 0.5 percent last month, jarring investors and suggesting the chances are greater the Federal Reserve will raise borrowing costs, government figures showed yesterday.Higher prices for gasoline, tobacco and automobiles paced the largest increase in the producer price index since a 0.6 percent rise in December 1995, Labor Department said. In August, the PPI rose 0.3 percent -- the first increase of the year -- after a post-World War II record of seven consecutive monthly declines.
BUSINESS
November 11, 1994
Wholesale prices fell in OctoberWholesale prices fell unexpectedly for a second straight month in October, as car prices posted their sharpest drop in a year and gasoline and heating oil prices also slumped, the government said yesterday.The Labor Department said its producer price index fell 0.5 percent last month, the same as in September. It was the first back-to-back drop in more than three years.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | February 19, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Producer prices registered their biggest drop in 4 1/2 years in January and builders continued to break ground on new housing at a rapid pace, signs the U.S. economy is poised for more growth without inflation."
BUSINESS
February 15, 2004
A weekly briefing on the economic calendar: Tuesday Earnings reports: First Health, Zale, Abercrombie, Agilent Wednesday The Census Bureau of the Department of Commerce announces housing starts and building permits for January. Starts are a measure of the number of residential units on which construction is begun each month, and permits represent the number of new excavations authorized. December housing starts showed a 2 percent gain from November's 20-year high. December permits were at a strong 1.924 million as housing demand remained near record levels.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | March 14, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Prices paid to U.S. factories, farmers and other producers dropped in February for the fourth month in a row as lower costs for imported goods and oil smothered even the faintest hint of inflation, a government report showed yesterday.The drop in energy prices led to a 0.1 percent fall in the Labor Department's Producer Price Index, which is sinking so far in 1998 at an annual rate of 4.5 percent. That's an even steeper drop than the 1.8 percent decline registered during the first two months of 1997, a year that saw the biggest fall in producer prices in more than a decade.
BUSINESS
By Robert D. Hershey Jr. and Robert D. Hershey Jr.,New York Times News Service | November 14, 1991
WASHINGTON -- In an inflation report that startled analysts, prices received by American producers jumped 0.7 percent in October, the biggest increase in a year, government figures showed yesterday. But close examination found the report much less worrisome than it first appeared.Given the weak economy -- and perhaps lulled by a string of favorable reports -- most specialists had expected little change in the Producer Price Index of finished goods, which measures inflation in the cost of goods just before they reach retail shelves and showrooms.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | January 13, 2001
WASHINGTON - Prices paid to U.S. factories, farmers and other producers showed little change in December as declines for food, gasoline and oil outweighed soaring costs for electricity and natural gas. Gains earlier in 2000 made the annual increase the largest in a decade. The producer price index didn't move last month after rising 0.1 percent in November, the Labor Department said yesterday. It was the tamest reading since the index fell 0.4 percent in August. For all of last year, the index rose 3.6 percent, the largest increase since oil prices sent it up 5.7 percent in 1990.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | March 14, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Prices paid to U.S. factories, farmers and other producers dropped in February for the fourth month in a row as lower costs for imported goods and oil smothered even the faintest hint of inflation, a government report showed yesterday.The drop in energy prices led to a 0.1 percent fall in the Labor Department's Producer Price Index, which is sinking so far in 1998 at an annual rate of 4.5 percent. That's an even steeper drop than the 1.8 percent decline registered during the first two months of 1997, a year that saw the biggest fall in producer prices in more than a decade.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | February 19, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Producer prices registered their biggest drop in 4 1/2 years in January and builders continued to break ground on new housing at a rapid pace, signs the U.S. economy is poised for more growth without inflation."
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | October 11, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Prices paid to U.S. factories, farmers and other producers rose a larger-than-expected 0.5 percent last month, jarring investors and suggesting the chances are greater the Federal Reserve will raise borrowing costs, government figures showed yesterday.Higher prices for gasoline, tobacco and automobiles paced the largest increase in the producer price index since a 0.6 percent rise in December 1995, Labor Department said. In August, the PPI rose 0.3 percent -- the first increase of the year -- after a post-World War II record of seven consecutive monthly declines.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | August 14, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Producer prices fell for the seventh consecutive month in July -- the first time that's happened since Herbert Hoover occupied the White House -- and retail sales rose last month in line with expectations, government reports showed yesterday.The reports showed little evidence of an overheating economy, causing some economists to speculate that the Federal Reserve will refrain from raising the overnight bank lending rate anytime soon."We have growth without inflation, which is exactly what [Fed Chairman Alan]
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | June 14, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Inflation remained in hiding in May as prices paid to U.S. factories, farmers, and other producers unexpectedly fell for the fifth month in a row -- the first time that has happened since Harry Truman lived in the White House 45 years ago, the government reported yesterday.Investors reacted with glee. Stocks rose to records for a sixth day and bonds surged, pushing yields to their lowest level in more than three months.It's "nearly a perfect economy" with low inflation, low unemployment and high consumer confidence, said William Sullivan, an economist at Dean Witter Reynolds in New York.
BUSINESS
November 14, 1991
NEW YORK (AP) -- Blue chip stock prices closed mostly higher yesterday after recovering from a dip caused by an an unexpected rise in producer prices.The Dow Jones average of 30 industrial stocks closed at 3,065.30, up 11.19 points. Earlier, the key index was off as much as 15 points.But overall, declining issues narrowly outnumbered advancing ones by a 5-4 ratio on the New York Stock Exchange. Big Board volume totaled 184.5 million shares.Before the stock market opened, the Labor Department reported its Producer Price Index of finished goods climbed 0.7 percent in October, its worst showing in a year.
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