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By Daniel B. Wroblewski and Daniel B. Wroblewski,Real Estate Editor | September 25, 1994
The Prodigy on-line service has added about one-third of Electronic Realty Associates' listings to its Homes and Land Electronic Magazine service, which lists homes for sale across the country.The service included about 60,000 listings pulled from those advertised in 300 Homes and Land magazines, according to Robert Horning, vice president for business development at Homes and Land Publishing Inc.The addition of ERA listings signaled the first time a company or chain has made all of its listings available to the Homes and Land service.
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SPORTS
Mike Klingaman | August 2, 2014
A century ago in spring training, a rawboned Orioles rookie stepped to the plate, swung from the heels and hit a fastball deep to right field. The ball landed in a rut in a cornfield, more than 400 feet from home plate. In Fayetteville, N.C., a historic marker notes the spot where George Herman Ruth, 19, hit his first professional home run in his first outing as an Oriole in 1914. He wasn't yet The Babe - teammates would pin that nickname on him within the month - but he surely was Baltimore's own. That Ruth began his career with his hometown team surprises many, sports historian Mark Millikin said.
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FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 21, 1998
Anne-Sophie Mutter has been famous for so long that it comes as something of a shock to realize that the great German violinist is not yet 35. Mutter, who gives a Washington Performing Arts Society recital at the Kennedy Center on Saturday at 5 p.m., with her favorite pianistic collaborator Lambert Orkis, is one of the most influential musicians of the final third of the 20th century.She's the one who made the world safe for prodigies; and she's made it OK for women in classical music to be babes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2014
The term “prodigy” has followed bluegrass singer-songwriter Sierra Hull for more than half her life. How could it not, when Alison Krauss invited her onto the Grand Ole Opry stage at age 11, and the respected Rounder Records released her debut album at 16? If she was under pressure then, Hull was enjoying too many new experiences to notice, she said on the phone last week from her home in Nashville, Tenn. “At that point, you don't really think too much about everything everyone is saying.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | December 18, 1994
When recordings by a 12-year-old pianist named Evgeny Kissin first filtered out of Moscow about 11 years ago, a chorus of piano aficionados pronounced him the kind of talent who emerges once in a century. Kissin has made good on those early reports of his prowess. At 23, he is unquestionably the world's most talked-about and sought-after pianist.But perhaps the critical fraternity (and this writer was among the loudest) should have waited until the century's end. Hot on Kissin's heels comes another extraordinary Russian-Jewish .prodigy -- Konstantin Lifschitz, now 18 years old. His just-released first records, made when he was 13 and 16, show a talent that is in some ways as spectacular as Kissin's, a repertory that suggests a range that Kissin has not (yet)
NEWS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2011
A month shy of his 16th birthday, Ty Hobson-Powell made history Sunday when he walked across the stage at The Lyric as the youngest person ever to graduate from the University of Baltimore. Hobson-Powell gave up a fledgling basketball career when he began college three years ago, commuted more than an hour each way from his home in Northwest Washington after transferring last fall from Howard University and once completed 27 credits in a single semester while shuttling between classes at Howard, Montgomery College and the Internet.
BUSINESS
By Leslie Cauley and Leslie Cauley,Sun Staff Correspondent | July 31, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Prodigy Services Co. wants to make this point perfectly clear: Contrary to published reports, the information services company doesn't peek at the private messages of its 1 million subscribers.That was the word yesterday from Prodigy, a joint venture of Sears, Roebuck and Co. and International Business Machines Corp. The company announced that it was making available to all members free of charge a software diskette to ensure that personal files stay that way.Prodigy has come under criticism after some users charged that the company was peeking at personal messages.
BUSINESS
By Rick Ratliff and Rick Ratliff,Knight-Ridder News Service | September 9, 1991
White Plains, N.Y. Some words trigger strong emotions. Say "Prodigy" to a home computer user and the reaction could be either love or hate.Some computer fans see the on-line service Prodigy as a convenient way to shop, play, communicate and get news over a personal computer. Others consider it a shallow, slow-running, glitzy service run by an oppressive bureaucracy."At first these controversies surprised us," said Prodigy spokesman Steve Hein. "Now it's clear we have active detractors versus active proponents."
BUSINESS
By Leslie Cauley | November 24, 1990
Prodigy, an online news and shopping service, has informed members that it would start limiting members to 30 free electronic messages a month starting Jan. 1, --ing lingering hopes among some subscribers that the service may abandon those plans."
BUSINESS
By Bill Husted and Bill Husted,Cox News Service | November 4, 1990
There's an angry electronic mob forming outside Prodigy, the nationwide information service for users of personal computer.Thousands of messages from subscribers protesting additional charges for electronic mail were clogging Prodigy's computers. But that stopped Tuesday night. Prodigy plugged the plug.Prodigy decided enough was enough and banned messages on its electronic network that criticized the charges. At the same time, the company kicked a "handful" of the dissenting subscribers off the service for taking their protest to advertisers on the network.
SPORTS
By Seth Boster, The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2013
When skateboarder Tom Schaar first stared down the great tongue of a vert ramp, he lurched forward and sent his tiny body tumbling down. "He was 6," recalled Schaar's mother, Regan, chuckling over the phone from Ocean City , where her 13-year-old son will compete in this weekend's Dew Tour. That day, seven years ago, Baltimore native Bucky Lasek was in Orange County, Calif., overseeing his skateboarding camp. Schaar was one of the participants who had to show the ability to roll down the ramp before joining the camp - a practice typically done on a board.
FEATURES
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2012
Two years ago, a dejected Bishme Cromartie almost gave up sewing altogether. He had just received a rejection letter from the famed Fashion Institute of Technology in New York. "I just sat there and cried. You would have thought that someone died in my arms," the 21-year-old recalled. "I stopped sketching and sewing. ... I started questioning myself. " Cromartie had done everything right. A creative type, he earned A's and B's at Reginald F. Lewis High School in Hamilton. He had been designing since age 7, when his aunt showed him the basics.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2012
The little orange pingpong balls are taking quite a beating, one after another being smashed off the racket of Tong Tong Gong as he practices with one of his three coaches. Though Gong learned the game as many others have, in the basement of his family's home, the 14-year-old from Ellicott City is playing a different kind of game these days. It is one that Gong hopes and his coaches believe will carry him to the Olympic Games someday — before he goes off to college. Since winning his first national 10-and-under tournament as a 7-year-old six months after he started playing, Gong has quickly ascended the rankings.
NEWS
By Jerry Zgoda, Minneapolis Star Tribune | December 22, 2011
MINNEAPOLIS - There are point guards who are made and those who, for the lack of a better term, are born to orchestrate because of their smarts, their vision, maybe just their innate nature. The Timberwolves possess each kind. On their coaching staff, they have Rick Adelman and Terry Porter, who played a combined 24 NBA seasons at that position because of their diligence and lessons learned. On the court, they have Ricky Rubio, who home video will show seemingly possessed an understanding of the game's angles and textures from nearly the moment he learned how to dribble.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2011
To properly understand the forces that shaped Dylan Bundy, and the journey that molded him into the best high school baseball player in the country, it's best to begin by talking about the red Oklahoma soil and the father's hands that toiled in them out of love. A decade before the Orioles selected Bundy with the fourth pick in the 2011 amateur draft, he was a stocky 8-year-old kid growing up in the tiny, no-stoplight town of Sperry, Okla. His family lived on 20 acres of dry, flat land, land that could have been farmed but was not. Instead, Dylan Bundy's father, Denver, who worked for Ford Motor Company in nearby Tulsa, looked at his vast backyard one day, and where some men might have envisioned rows of corn or cotton, he pictured a pitching mound.
NEWS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2011
A month shy of his 16th birthday, Ty Hobson-Powell made history Sunday when he walked across the stage at The Lyric as the youngest person ever to graduate from the University of Baltimore. Hobson-Powell gave up a fledgling basketball career when he began college three years ago, commuted more than an hour each way from his home in Northwest Washington after transferring last fall from Howard University and once completed 27 credits in a single semester while shuttling between classes at Howard, Montgomery College and the Internet.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | May 29, 1995
WHITE PLAINS, N.Y. -- For Prodigy Services Co., it seems, no good deed goes unpunished.The joint venture of Sears, Roebuck & Co. and International Business Machines Corp. long has staked out a position as the family-oriented on-line service, where computers and humans try strip obscene and offensive messages from its network.That policy came back to haunt White Plains, N.Y.-based Prodigy last week, when a New York state court judge found the company exercised editorial control and therefore must defend itself against a $200 million libel suit by Stratton Oakmont Inc. over comments "posted" by a Prodigy subscriber on a computer bulletin board.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case | March 8, 2011
I'm late on this, but it wouldn't be right if I didn't mention Mobb Deep's Prodigy coming home yesterday after serving a three-year bid for gun possession. This wasn't the H.N.I.C.'s first prison stint but let's hope it's his last. Prodigy is a legend in the game, and based on the lack of New York rappers making noise, his gritty voice is needed more than ever. Welcome home, P. Here's a throwback: "Keep It Thoro" from 2000's H.N.I.C. Bonus clip: Prodigy speaks after his release.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2011
On a misty afternoon, the vista beyond her windows — the peaceful West River, lashed to life by a brisk and sudden rain — might as well be the Galway Bay of song or a fog-shrouded inlet of the Irish Sea. Such Celtic scenes lie 3,000 miles to the east, but to Maggie Sansone, they feel no further away than a tune she can't shake from her mind. "Sometimes I look out there and think, 'Those are the same waters that reach out and touch Ireland, Scotland and the Isle of Man," says Sansone, a Shady Side resident who happens to be one of America's top performers on the hammered dulcimer, an instrument that dates back 2,000 years and can — in the right hands — make sounds as primeval as haze on a lonely moor.
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