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By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Ms. Marbella is a writer for The Sun | April 26, 1992
PRODIGAL SON: DANCINGFOR BALANCHINE IN A WORLDOF PAIN AND MAGIC.Edward Villellawith Larry Kaplan.Simon & Schuster.306 pages. $23. How do you tell, Yeats once asked, the dancer from the dance?That question turns especially mind-tickling when the dancer is a Balanchine dancer, one of those fast, sleek thoroughbreds raised and trained to carry out the singular vision of New York City Ballet founder George Balanchine.In part, "Prodigal Son" can be seen as Edward Villella's attempt to answer this question.
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SPORTS
By MIKE PRESTON and MIKE PRESTON,mike.preston@baltsun.com | March 5, 2009
The prodigal son has returned to Baltimore. After failing to find a fortune in other areas of the country, linebacker Ray Lewis, one of Baltimore's all-time favorite sports figures, agreed in principle to a reported three-year, incentive-laden contract worth $22 million with the Ravens. Now that Lewis can finish his Hall of Fame career in Baltimore, all is right with the world again. OK, that's a stretch, but there will be peace in Baltimore. This city's love affair with No. 52 can continue after a brief separation.
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NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Staff Writer | April 24, 1992
JOHNSTOWN, Pa. -- Declaring himself closer to God, former Washington Mayor Marion S. Barry Jr. walked out of prison and back into the public eye yesterday."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Clarinda Harriss and Clarinda Harriss,Special to the Sun | December 17, 2000
"Life," a friend once said, "is just so damn daily." Readers of fiction get to escape their dailiness by spending a few hours living other people's lives. Shouldn't readers of poetry have the same privilege? Bored with the East Coast WASPish academic grayness of my own life, I rummaged through several hundred new books of poetry seeking color. I wanted poems that would propel me out of myself and breathe new romance into my long love affair with the English language. I found myself drawn to poets with non-Anglo names and poets whose back-cover photos suggested complex bloodlines.
NEWS
April 5, 1995
Stacy Sewell, who in an unprecedented transplant surgery received a lung lobe from each of her living parents, died Saturday on her 24th birthday from complications of bacterial pneumonia. The resident of the Mojave Desert town of Quartz Hill, Calif., suffered from cystic fibrosis. Barbara and James Sewell each donated a lobe of their lungs to their daughter Jan. 29, 1993. It was the first double lobar lung transplant in which both lobes came from relatives. After the transplant, her lungs were restored to normal lung capacity.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson | March 2, 1992
PRODIGAL SON: DANCING FOR BALANCHINE IN A WORLD OF PAIN AND MAGIC. By Edward Villella with Larry Kaplan. Simon & Schuster. 306 pages. $23.IT ISN'T surprising that Edward Villella's autobiography begins with this pronouncement: "By my count, this is at least the fifth book written by a New York City ballet dancer about George Balanchine."About George Balanchine.Not about Edward Villella, the brilliant dancer whose American athleticism left its imprint on 20th century ballet; whose appearances on the the Bell Telephone Hour and the Ed Sullivan Show demonstrated to a nation that men could be manly ballet dancers.
FEATURES
By Kristy Montee and Kristy Montee,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 11, 2000
No one is really sure what George Balanchine meant when he echoed King Louis XV's famous quote, "Apres moi, le deluge." The choreographer of the world's most precise and eloquent ballets was notoriously - even gleefully - obtuse when it came to talking about his art. The naysayers who feared a decline for the New York City Ballet under Balanchine's successor, Peter Martins, saw it as an apocalyptic prediction. Even the most optimistic saw it as a simple statement of fact. After Balanchine's death in 1983, how could ballet ever be the same?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Clarinda Harriss and Clarinda Harriss,Special to the Sun | December 17, 2000
"Life," a friend once said, "is just so damn daily." Readers of fiction get to escape their dailiness by spending a few hours living other people's lives. Shouldn't readers of poetry have the same privilege? Bored with the East Coast WASPish academic grayness of my own life, I rummaged through several hundred new books of poetry seeking color. I wanted poems that would propel me out of myself and breathe new romance into my long love affair with the English language. I found myself drawn to poets with non-Anglo names and poets whose back-cover photos suggested complex bloodlines.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | October 6, 1998
Lucas van Leyden's engraving of "The Return of the Prodigal Son" (about 1510) is a tour de force of Renaissance printmaking. As its focus, two groups of figures bracket the central image of the son kneeling before his father to ask forgiveness. But the image includes so much more: an elaborate group of buildings on the left, a craggy landscape from which springs a group of trees with every leaf delineated, a scene of rural life stretching off into the distance at the right.The image not only makes the parable visible but also teaches the viewer something about the architecture, costume and everyday life in Van Leyden's time.
SPORTS
By MIKE PRESTON and MIKE PRESTON,mike.preston@baltsun.com | March 5, 2009
The prodigal son has returned to Baltimore. After failing to find a fortune in other areas of the country, linebacker Ray Lewis, one of Baltimore's all-time favorite sports figures, agreed in principle to a reported three-year, incentive-laden contract worth $22 million with the Ravens. Now that Lewis can finish his Hall of Fame career in Baltimore, all is right with the world again. OK, that's a stretch, but there will be peace in Baltimore. This city's love affair with No. 52 can continue after a brief separation.
FEATURES
By Kristy Montee and Kristy Montee,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 11, 2000
No one is really sure what George Balanchine meant when he echoed King Louis XV's famous quote, "Apres moi, le deluge." The choreographer of the world's most precise and eloquent ballets was notoriously - even gleefully - obtuse when it came to talking about his art. The naysayers who feared a decline for the New York City Ballet under Balanchine's successor, Peter Martins, saw it as an apocalyptic prediction. Even the most optimistic saw it as a simple statement of fact. After Balanchine's death in 1983, how could ballet ever be the same?
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | October 6, 1998
Lucas van Leyden's engraving of "The Return of the Prodigal Son" (about 1510) is a tour de force of Renaissance printmaking. As its focus, two groups of figures bracket the central image of the son kneeling before his father to ask forgiveness. But the image includes so much more: an elaborate group of buildings on the left, a craggy landscape from which springs a group of trees with every leaf delineated, a scene of rural life stretching off into the distance at the right.The image not only makes the parable visible but also teaches the viewer something about the architecture, costume and everyday life in Van Leyden's time.
NEWS
April 5, 1995
Stacy Sewell, who in an unprecedented transplant surgery received a lung lobe from each of her living parents, died Saturday on her 24th birthday from complications of bacterial pneumonia. The resident of the Mojave Desert town of Quartz Hill, Calif., suffered from cystic fibrosis. Barbara and James Sewell each donated a lobe of their lungs to their daughter Jan. 29, 1993. It was the first double lobar lung transplant in which both lobes came from relatives. After the transplant, her lungs were restored to normal lung capacity.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Ms. Marbella is a writer for The Sun | April 26, 1992
PRODIGAL SON: DANCINGFOR BALANCHINE IN A WORLDOF PAIN AND MAGIC.Edward Villellawith Larry Kaplan.Simon & Schuster.306 pages. $23. How do you tell, Yeats once asked, the dancer from the dance?That question turns especially mind-tickling when the dancer is a Balanchine dancer, one of those fast, sleek thoroughbreds raised and trained to carry out the singular vision of New York City Ballet founder George Balanchine.In part, "Prodigal Son" can be seen as Edward Villella's attempt to answer this question.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Staff Writer | April 24, 1992
JOHNSTOWN, Pa. -- Declaring himself closer to God, former Washington Mayor Marion S. Barry Jr. walked out of prison and back into the public eye yesterday."
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson | March 2, 1992
PRODIGAL SON: DANCING FOR BALANCHINE IN A WORLD OF PAIN AND MAGIC. By Edward Villella with Larry Kaplan. Simon & Schuster. 306 pages. $23.IT ISN'T surprising that Edward Villella's autobiography begins with this pronouncement: "By my count, this is at least the fifth book written by a New York City ballet dancer about George Balanchine."About George Balanchine.Not about Edward Villella, the brilliant dancer whose American athleticism left its imprint on 20th century ballet; whose appearances on the the Bell Telephone Hour and the Ed Sullivan Show demonstrated to a nation that men could be manly ballet dancers.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Sun Staff Correspondent | August 31, 1991
NEW YORK -- It was a tennis epic that ended with a lob.For 4 hours, 33 minutes, Michael Chang and John McEnroe slugged it out in the second round of the U.S. Open. They began the match last night at a packed Louis Armstrong Stadium, and they finished it this morning at 1:27 in front of thousands who were standing and screaming.Chang hit the final shot, a bending backhand topspin lob that froze McEnroe at the net. The ball fell out of the sky and landed a foot inside the baseline and brought Chang a magnificent victory, 6-4, 4-6, 7-6 (7-1)
SPORTS
By JOE STRAUSS | June 18, 2000
Matt Riley -- DOWN -- The Orioles' prodigal son is in Bowie, in the bullpen and in a season-long funk. Is he paying the price for too many innings last season or too few this spring? Alan Mills -- UP -- He was too expensive after the '98 season at $6.5 million for three years. Now that the Dodgers will pay one-third of his $5.25 million the next two seasons, Mills again fits a bullpen that hadn't been right since his departure. The Rapper -- EVEN -- No. 4 starter Pat Rapp is struggling on the mound, but he nailed inconsistent local scorekeeping Wednesday night.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Sun Staff Correspondent | August 31, 1991
NEW YORK -- It was a tennis epic that ended with a lob.For 4 hours, 33 minutes, Michael Chang and John McEnroe slugged it out in the second round of the U.S. Open. They began the match last night at a packed Louis Armstrong Stadium, and they finished it this morning at 1:27 in front of thousands who were standing and screaming.Chang hit the final shot, a bending backhand topspin lob that froze McEnroe at the net. The ball fell out of the sky and landed a foot inside the baseline and brought Chang a magnificent victory, 6-4, 4-6, 7-6 (7-1)
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