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Procurement Process

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By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2012
Confronted with a botched contract award by one of his departments, Gov. Martin O'Malley suggested Wednesday that Maryland's procurement process is desperately in need of an overhaul. Among other things, O'Malley hinted that a large measure of the responsibility for overseeing the contract-award process could be taken out of the hands of the Department of Budget and Taxation. Such a move would be a significant shift in a process Maryland has long used to award billions of dollars in contracts each year to private companies and nonprofits.
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NEWS
March 29, 2014
A decade ago, the redevelopment of the state office complex in midtown Baltimore — now known as State Center — looked like a no-brainer. Built in the 1950s and 1960s, the five buildings in the 28-acre complex, which hadn't exactly been architecturally inspired to begin with, needed to be replaced. And the site's access to Baltimore's Metro subway system suggested great potential for transit-oriented development. But wait, it was even better than that. State Center is also convenient to the city's major cultural attractions and to the light rail line as well as MARC commuter rail, so state and city officials thought big — a $1.5 billion mixed use project with apartments for a variety of income levels, a grocery store and shopping as well as a parking garage and office space for state employees, all of which could be accomplished as a public-private partnership.
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NEWS
By BRIAN WITTE | July 12, 2012
ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) — Gov. Martin O'Malley said Wednesday he wants to bring in outside help to review Maryland's procurement process for state contracts after repeated problems that agencies have experienced in bidding out for services over the years. O'Malley's comments at a Board of Public Works meeting were made as the board extended a $4.3 million contract extension for a company to run a call center that takes questions about child support payments. The extension is needed because the process that was used to hire a new contractor was found to be deeply flawed by the Maryland State Board of Contract Appeals.
NEWS
February 25, 2014
The temptation, upon hearing the news that Maryland has fired the prime contractor building its troubled health insurance exchange, is to echo Rep. John Delaney's question: What took so long? Indeed, there have been signs for months - dating to even before the site's launch - that Noridian Healthcare Solutions was not up to the task. Switching from that firm to the Columbia-based company credited with fixing the federal site would seem like a no-brainer. But the truth is, this move is unlikely to be a panacea for Maryland's exchange, which still faces grave challenges in the weeks leading up to the end of open enrollment on March 31. Noridian was chosen as the exchange's lead contractor through a streamlined procurement process in early 2012.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Sun Staff Writer | April 5, 1995
The nation's biggest defense contractor yesterday proposed to build fighter planes for the military the way other commercial companies build automobiles, refrigerators and televisions.Lockheed Martin Corp. said that modifying its F-16 fighter plane production operations would save the Pentagon hundreds of millions of dollars by eliminating red tape and cutting documentation costs.The company says it wants to "commercialize" the process, meaning among other things that subcontractors would work directly with Lockheed Martin rather than having to bid through a government procurement process.
NEWS
August 21, 1995
Gov. Parris N. Glendening delivered the right message to top officials in his administration: Keep away from the $100 million-a-year computer contract that the Maryland Lottery Agency will award later this year. Given the controversies surrounding the last lottery contract for computer services -- including a lengthy federal probe of possible wrongdoing -- it is imperative that this procurement process not be tainted in any way.Throughout the nation, awarding lottery computer contracts has generated charges of favoritism, political manipulation and payoffs.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Staff Writer | October 16, 1992
Under pressure from lawmakers, Gov. William Donald Schaefer has decided to appoint an independent blue-ribbon commission to oversee the awarding of a controversial auto emissions testing contract.The seven-member panel will oversee and advise the Department of Transportation, reviewing proposals and making recommendations on the award of the contract, said Page Boinest, a spokeswoman for Governor Schaefer.The contract, which is expected to be worth $100 million, would upgrade, expand and set higher standards for Maryland's tailpipe monitoring program.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | November 2, 1990
Saying he hopes to shield himself and the General Assembly from potential charges of favoritism, Gov. William Donald Schaefer announced yesterday that he will appoint two committees to review bids for a new $75 million lottery computer system.Four companies represented by four of the most successful and influential of Annapolis lobbyists -- several with close ties to Mr. Schaefer -- have expressed an interest in submitting bids. Three of the four have complained publicly that bid specifications prepared by the State Lottery Agency are biased in favor of the fourth potential bidder, Control Data Corp.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Evening Sun Staff | July 31, 1991
The losing bidder in a prolonged battle to win the state's lucrative lottery contract has asked the Maryland State Lottery Agency to open an investigation into how the contract process was handled.Citing an article published July 24 in The Evening Sun about how lobbyists influenced the lottery contract process, Marcel Helou, sales vice president for Control Data Corp., asked state lottery officials to determine if "inside information" from the agency was leaked to lobbyists for GTECH Corp.
NEWS
October 6, 1992
With $100 million or more at stake, there's a strong temptation for state politicians to throw their weight around to ensure that Maryland's auto-emissions testing contract goes to the politically correct company. That's why the Schaefer administration should keep the decision-making process as impartial and non-political as possible.Already, two powerful black legislators have met with the governor and with top transportation officials to get special consideration for a black-owned company eager to win the bid. According to one participant's account, the legislators threatened "trouble for the department" unless the procurement process was intentionally tilted in the direction of their favored company.
NEWS
February 23, 2014
At last week's Board of Public Works meeting, Comptroller Peter Franchot asked a series of pointed questions about the process by which the state selected the vendors who built Maryland's flawed health insurance exchange website. In particular, he suggested that the state was ill served by legislation that exempted the health exchange's procurement from review by the Board of Public Works. "There's a damn good reason this board has stood the test of time since the Constitutional Convention of 1864," he said.
NEWS
July 25, 2013
After reading Joe Bartenfelder's comments, I had to point out the additional arrogance of our current elected officials. We can talk with the Dundalk residents about the treatment they've received, or move around other parts of the county.   Just look at the Mays Chapel school situation, totally disregarding residents' opinions, community needs and appropriate sizing of the school footprint. The arrogance continued there with the completion of a .14 walking trail. Are you kidding?
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2013
Baltimore County is preparing to sell three taxpayer-owned properties to private developers, but members of the public won't know all the details of what they're planning until officials make a decision. County leaders said last week they would not release proposals for the North Point Government Center in Dundalk, the Towson fire station, and a police substation in Randallstown after The Baltimore Sun filed a Public Information Act request. Don Mohler, County Executive Kevin Kamenetz's chief of staff, said the county wants to keep the documents under wraps so that the procurement process is "devoid of any kind of external pressure.
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2012
WEATHER The National Weather Service is calling for Thursday to be mostly sunny in the Baltimore area, with a high near 94 and southeast winds 5 to 8 miles per hour in the morning. Thursday night is expected to be mostly cloudy, with a low around 76 and south winds around 6 miles per hour or less. Friday is expected to be partly sunny, with a high near 91 and winds around 5 miles per hour in the afternoon. TRAFFIC Check our traffic updates for this morning's issues as you plan your commute.
NEWS
By BRIAN WITTE | July 12, 2012
ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) — Gov. Martin O'Malley said Wednesday he wants to bring in outside help to review Maryland's procurement process for state contracts after repeated problems that agencies have experienced in bidding out for services over the years. O'Malley's comments at a Board of Public Works meeting were made as the board extended a $4.3 million contract extension for a company to run a call center that takes questions about child support payments. The extension is needed because the process that was used to hire a new contractor was found to be deeply flawed by the Maryland State Board of Contract Appeals.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2012
Confronted with a botched contract award by one of his departments, Gov. Martin O'Malley suggested Wednesday that Maryland's procurement process is desperately in need of an overhaul. Among other things, O'Malley hinted that a large measure of the responsibility for overseeing the contract-award process could be taken out of the hands of the Department of Budget and Taxation. Such a move would be a significant shift in a process Maryland has long used to award billions of dollars in contracts each year to private companies and nonprofits.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2012
As state officials took action to deal with a botched contract award, Gov. Martin O'Malley said Wednesday that Maryland's procurement process needs an overhaul and perhaps a new watchdog. The governor's remarks came as the Board of Public Works approved spending $4.3 million to extend a contract to run a child-support enforcement call center while the Department of Human Resources seeks new bids. The extension was necessary after an appeals panel overturned the department's decision to award the work to a rival company.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | June 19, 2003
The Board of Public Works granted yesterday a six-month contract extension to Maximus Inc.. the private firm that enforces child-support orders in Baltimore, to allow the company to appeal the state's choice of a rival bidder to run the program. Maximus, based in Reston, Va., has appealed the state's decision to award the contract to Denver-based Policy Studies Inc. to the state Board of Con-tract Appeals. The state Department of Hu-man Resources' decision last month to award the contract to PSI came as a severe blow to Maximus, which had spent more than $100,000 to lobby the General Assembly for passage of a bill requiring that the city child-support program be run by a private contractor.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2012
As state officials took action to deal with a botched contract award, Gov. Martin O'Malley said Wednesday that Maryland's procurement process needs an overhaul and perhaps a new watchdog. The governor's remarks came as the Board of Public Works approved spending $4.3 million to extend a contract to run a child-support enforcement call center while the Department of Human Resources seeks new bids. The extension was necessary after an appeals panel overturned the department's decision to award the work to a rival company.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2012
The agency that oversees the state's health plan for those uninsured because of preexisting conditions, paid a vendor nearly $367,000 for information technology services without proving that the contract was chosen through a competitive bidding process, a legislative audit has found. The audit also said The Maryland Health Insurance Plan did not perform routine reviews to make sure the insurer that manages the plan for the state, CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield, was complying with its contract.
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