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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2014
Wendy S. Levy, director of procurement and administrative services for Publishers' Circulation Fulfillment Inc. for two decades, died Tuesday of breast cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. She was 57. The daughter of Arnold Kleinfeld, a packaging salesman, and Helena Dressner Kleinfeld, a New York City public schools social worker, Wendy Susan Kleinfeld was born in New York City and raised in Great Neck, N.Y. She graduated in 1975 from Great Neck North High School. She attended Syracuse University.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2014
Wendy S. Levy, director of procurement and administrative services for Publishers' Circulation Fulfillment Inc. for two decades, died Tuesday of breast cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. She was 57. The daughter of Arnold Kleinfeld, a packaging salesman, and Helena Dressner Kleinfeld, a New York City public schools social worker, Wendy Susan Kleinfeld was born in New York City and raised in Great Neck, N.Y. She graduated in 1975 from Great Neck North High School. She attended Syracuse University.
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NEWS
By J. JOSEPH CURRAN Jr | September 30, 1993
When the state wants to make a major purchase -- such as Medevac helicopters, or a vehicle-emissions testing system, or a fiber-optic distance learning network -- there are two core issues: First, did the state get the best product at the best price; and second, was the process fair and untainted by improper influence?''Special access'' is at the core of Maryland's procurement woes. Whether it is the perception of special access or the actual dispensing of it doesn't really matter: As long as it could exist, it might as well exist.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2014
Coppin State University's former director of facilities was charged this week with multiple counts of procurement fraud, though details on his alleged crimes have so far not been revealed. Jerry Lamont Stamper, 59, of Randallstown, faces three felony counts of procurement fraud stemming from incidents in September 2008, May 2009 and March 2010, according to the Maryland Attorney General's Office. Prosecutors allege that Stamper "falsified and suppressed material facts in connection with procurements made through the University, which resulted in his personal gain.
NEWS
January 19, 1994
A special joint legislative panel has come up with some practical suggestions for strengthening Maryland's 13-year-old law governing the purchase of $4 billion worth of goods and services each year for state government. The proposals go a long way toward mending what is clearly a tattered procurement statute.During four months of hearings, the blue-ribbon panel heard testimony about irregularities in awarding multi-million-dollar contracts. No wrongdoing was uncovered, but there were many instances of subtle forms of favoritism that the 1981 procurement law was supposed to avoid.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | September 14, 1990
WASHINGTON -- The Navy Department said in a report disclosed at a House Government Operations Committee hearing yesterday that it had found no evidence that IBM violated federal contracting laws in procuring Navy contracts.Hearings held by the committee last fall disclosed that Navy officials had visited an International Business Machines Corp. training center that featured golf and tennis and that Navy personnel had asked IBM officials for help in writing a solicitation for computer equipment.
NEWS
April 2, 2008
Anyone who has ever built a home addition can see the danger. You strike a deal with a contractor, then ask for changes that end up costing a small fortune. It's been much the same way with the purchase of Pentagon weapons systems, except for this: Department of Defense officials have been indifferent to the problem, and the cost to taxpayers has been astronomical - large enough to impugn the professionalism of project managers and suggest that radical reforms in procurement are needed.
BUSINESS
By Greg Schneider and Greg Schneider,Sun Staff | January 23, 2000
Maryland has been trying for years to build an industrial base that isn't dependent on doing business with the fickle federal government. Now comes the payoff: Not only has the state built up a burgeoning technology industry, its business with the government is booming, as well. Maryland ranked third in the nation in per capita federal procurement spending in 1998, the most recent year for which statistics are available from the Consolidated Federal Funds Report of the Census Bureau. All told, the federal government spent nearly $18.5 billion in Maryland in 1998 for procurement contracts, salaries and wages.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | November 10, 2011
The top procurement official at the State Highway Administration has left the agency four months after a harshly critical legislative audit criticized the agency's performance in the awarding of contracts. The SHA announced the departure of Robert P. Gay, director of the agency's Office of Procurement, in an email to staff on Monday. SHA officials, saying that state law prevents them from commenting on personnel matters, gave no explanation. But Gay, reached at his home in Harford County, confirmed his departure.
BUSINESS
By Ed Waldman and Ed Waldman,SUN STAFF | June 3, 2004
Responding to harsh criticism of its procedures in the wake of a legislative audit, the Maryland Stadium Authority yesterday adopted a new policy for procurement that its chairman hopes will let the agency return its focus to economic development. The stadium authority came under fire in this year's General Assembly after the audit sharply rebuked it for awarding $66 million in construction contracts without normal bidding, for sloppy bookkeeping and lax board oversight. The controversy led to the resignation of the executive director, Richard W. Slosson, who was cited by auditors for accepting gifts from a company that was doing business with the authority.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | December 29, 2012
Aberdeen Proving Ground has a lot more money to spend on contracts than it once did but not as much as in the very recent past. Such is the push-pull effect of new funding from the military's national base realignment and closure effort, coupled with tighter federal budgets and less wartime spending. The Army post in Harford County obligated $15.5 billion in the fiscal year that ended in September. That's up $12 billion from 2005, the year the BRAC changes were announced, but down nearly $2 billion from 2011.
EXPLORE
October 23, 2012
The Baltimore Washington Region Government Procurement Fair will be held Wednesday, Oct. 31, 8 a.m. to noon, at Martins Crosswinds, 7400 Greenway Center Drive, in Greenbelt. More than 50 government agencies will be present. Informational sessions and one-on-one sessions with buyers will be available. Registration begins 7:30 a.m. The prepaid price for Baltimore Washington Corridor Chamber members is $65; nonmembers $95; all at the door, $125. Register at http://www.baltwashchamber.org/events and click on Government Procurement Fair.
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman | September 21, 2012
Maryland Attorney General Doug Gansler has reached a settlement with California-based CleanWell Company and OhSo Clean Inc, the makers of a hand sanitizer that claimed it was "proven to kill 99.99 percent of germs that can make you sick. " Gansler's investigation revealed no actual proof that those statements were true. CleanWell must pay $100,000 in penalties and costs, and will no longer be allowed to assert that its hand sanitizer can prevent disease or infection. “Companies that make unsubstantiated claims about their products deceive consumers into spending their hard-earned money on something that may not live up to its billing,” Gansler said in a statement.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2012
Despite tightening school budgets and a perpetual rallying cry for more funding, Baltimore school administrators spent roughly $500,000 during the past year and a half on expenses such as a $7,300 office retreat at a downtown hotel, $300-per-night stays at hotels, and a $1,000 dinner at an exclusive members-only club, credit card statements show. City school officials defend the majority of the credit card expenditures - outlined in statements and receipts obtained by The Baltimore Sun through a Maryland Public Information Act request - as "the cost of doing business," saying only a handful of "outliers" show questionable judgment or disregard for taxpayer money.
NEWS
By BRIAN WITTE | July 12, 2012
ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) — Gov. Martin O'Malley said Wednesday he wants to bring in outside help to review Maryland's procurement process for state contracts after repeated problems that agencies have experienced in bidding out for services over the years. O'Malley's comments at a Board of Public Works meeting were made as the board extended a $4.3 million contract extension for a company to run a call center that takes questions about child support payments. The extension is needed because the process that was used to hire a new contractor was found to be deeply flawed by the Maryland State Board of Contract Appeals.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2012
Confronted with a botched contract award by one of his departments, Gov. Martin O'Malley suggested Wednesday that Maryland's procurement process is desperately in need of an overhaul. Among other things, O'Malley hinted that a large measure of the responsibility for overseeing the contract-award process could be taken out of the hands of the Department of Budget and Taxation. Such a move would be a significant shift in a process Maryland has long used to award billions of dollars in contracts each year to private companies and nonprofits.
BUSINESS
By Tawanda W. Johnson and Tawanda W. Johnson,Special to Baltimoresun.com | March 22, 2004
Does doing business with government agencies conjure up images of bureaucratic red tape for you? Organizers of the eighth annual Minority Business Conference hope to make the process easier by providing helpful information during its Friday session, "Doing Business with Governments." The free event is sponsored by the Maryland Transportation Department, Office of Minority Business Enterprise, Korean MBE Association and the Asian American Business Community. Participants may meet MBE and procurement officers from state, county and city government agencies, as well as their prime contractors, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at MDOT's headquarters, 7201 Corporate Center Drive in Hanover.
NEWS
August 15, 1996
Paul Pedone was misidentified in an article in yesterday's A La Carte section. He is director of produce procurement for Super Fresh supermarkets.The Sun regrets the errors.Pub Date: 8/15/96
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2012
As state officials took action to deal with a botched contract award, Gov. Martin O'Malley said Wednesday that Maryland's procurement process needs an overhaul and perhaps a new watchdog. The governor's remarks came as the Board of Public Works approved spending $4.3 million to extend a contract to run a child-support enforcement call center while the Department of Human Resources seeks new bids. The extension was necessary after an appeals panel overturned the department's decision to award the work to a rival company.
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