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By Michael Dresser and Holly Selby and Michael Dresser and Holly Selby,Staff Writers | January 14, 1994
Procter & Gamble Co., a stalwart of Baltimore's industrial waterfront for six decades, said yesterday that it will close its Locust Point manufacturing plant and eliminate 215 jobs.Operations at the sprawling brick complex, which opened in 1930 as the nation was sinking into the Great Depression, will be phased out over the next 12 to 18 months, said industrial relations spokeswoman Evelyn Davis.The plant produces Ivory, Dawn and Joy dish-washing liquids, as well as refined glycerin for industrial use.In the past it made many other P&G products, including bar soap and laundry detergent.
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By Samantha Iacia, For The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2014
Date: March 29 Her story: Annabelle Alberts, 30, grew up in Detroit. She lived in New York City for 31/2 years before moving to Maryland in September 2012. She is the manager of marketing for Deloitte Forensic in Baltimore. Her parents, Marcia and Mike Alberts, live in Bloomfield Hills, Mich. His story: Scott Palagyi, 31, was born in Pittsburgh but grew up in York, Pa. He spent seven years working in Ohio for Procter & Gamble before being relocated to Baltimore about three years ago. He is the northeast distributions center operations leader for Procter & Gamble in Hunt Valley.
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NEWS
By Frank Lynch | February 14, 1993
Harford County may have lost Coca-Cola but chances appear good it will gain Procter & Gamble.The Cincinnati-based conglomerate is considering three Harford sites and one in Baltimore County as possible locations for a 400,000-square-foot distribution center."
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2013
David Waldemar Gjerde, a retired Procter & Gamble executive who became a restaurant investor and consultant to his sons, Spike and Charlie, died of a heart attack May 2 at his Cockeysville home. He was 75. Born in Mankato, Minn., he was the son of Waldemar Gjerde, an engineer, and the former Ferne Sorenson, a church organist. Raised in Cedar Falls, Iowa, he earned an engineering degree from the University of Iowa. He served in the Army National Guard. He joined Procter & Gamble in Iowa and moved to Maryland in 1968 with his wife, the former Alice Silletto, and their two sons.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | April 3, 1996
CINCINNATI -- Procter & Gamble Co. said yesterday that it has added Amway Corp. to a lawsuit that accuses an Amway distributor of spreading false statements linking P&G with Satanism.Cincinnati-based P&G, the largest U.S. consumer-products company, filed the suit against Randy Haugen in August, alleging that he used Amway's electronic voice mail system to spread the rumor to other Amway distributors.The lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court in Utah, is the 15th such legal action initiated by P&G over the years.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN STAFF | June 21, 1996
Procter & Gamble Co. said yesterday that it will try to sell a few smaller fragrance lines managed from its Hunt Valley cosmetics headquarters so it can concentrate on its flagship Giorgio, Hugo Boss and Laura Biagiotti perfumes.A sale wouldn't reduce Hunt Valley's employment of 1,600, said spokeswoman Kimberly L. Stewart. About a dozen people in finance or marketing for the brands will be shifted to P&G's cosmetics business, she said.The perfumes to be sold are NaVy, NaVy for Men, Jaclyn Smith's California, California for Men, Incognito, Le Jardin and Toujours Moi. All are produced by outside contractors in other parts of the country, Stewart said, so production here won't be affected.
BUSINESS
By Amanda J. Crawford | March 12, 2000
Consumer products giant Procter & Gamble surprised Wall Street last week with news that its earnings for its fiscal third quarter ending March 31 would fall 10 percent to 11 percent from a year earlier. The announcement caused its stock to drop more than $26 a share, erasing more than $35 billion in market value and contributing to a 374-point decline in the Dow Jones industrial average, its fourth biggest point loss ever. The maker of products such as Ivory soap, Crest toothpaste, Pampers diapers and Tide laundry detergent blamed competition in Latin America, higher-than-expected costs and a delay in U.S. approval of osteoporosis drug Actonel for the shortfall.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | March 20, 1999
The Baltimore development company that rehabilitated the dormant American Can Co. plant has turned its sights on renovating the abandoned Procter & Gamble Co. soap plant in Locust Point.Struever Bros. Eccles & Rouse Inc.'s work on the Canton landmark resulted in significant retail space. It is studying converting the 26-acre waterfront site at 1422 Nicholson St. into primarily office space."In terms of the energy and the excitement level, we're thinking of it in terms of American Can, and in terms of the character we're hoping it will have -- but we're thinking at this point, and it's very early in the process -- that it will be just office space," said Bill Struever, the company's president.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | June 13, 2002
CINCINNATI - Procter & Gamble Co. increased its fiscal fourth-quarter profit forecast yesterday because of higher sales of Tide detergent and Crest toothbrushes, and rising currencies in Europe and Japan. Profit, excluding costs for plant closings and selling product lines, will rise by a percentage in the "high teens" from 63 cents a share in the year-earlier period, the company said, declining to be more specific. The largest U.S. maker of household goods, which makes half of its sales overseas, has been helped by an 8 percent increase in the euro and a 3 percent rise in the Japanese yen in the past three months.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | April 2, 2010
Harry Bryner Benninghoff, a retired Procter & Gamble executive who had a happy second career in his retirement working as an Orioles tour guide at Camden Yards, died Saturday of complications from melanoma at his Ruxton home. He was 77. Mr. Benninghoff was born and raised in Abington, Pa, and during his years at Moreland High School in Willow Grove, Pa., was an outstanding baseball, football and basketball player. After graduating from high school in 1950, he attended Cheshire Academy in Cheshire, Conn.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2011
Under Armour is to announce today that it will buy the Tide Point waterfront office complex in Locust Point to serve as a corporate campus, cementing the international sports apparel company's home in Baltimore. The company now occupies nearly half of the 400,000-square-foot Tide Point complex, but for several years it has been on the hunt for a campus, a feature boasted by rival Nike and other sports companies. Under Armour's search has sent executives across the country to study campuses maintained by firms such as Quicksilver, PacSun, Google and Intuit.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2010
Child care service provider Bright Horizons plans to open a 20,000-square-foot child care center this fall at Tide Point in Locust Point. It will be the 12th facility in Maryland for the Massachusetts-based company and will serve the community-at-large rather than one specific employer, according to spokesperson Bridget Perry. Bright Horizons has negotiated a 10-year lease to occupy the waterfront space formerly occupied by the Board of Child Care in the Cascade Building at Tide Point, the old Procter & Gamble plant soap factory converted to offices by Struever Bros.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | April 2, 2010
Harry Bryner Benninghoff, a retired Procter & Gamble executive who had a happy second career in his retirement working as an Orioles tour guide at Camden Yards, died Saturday of complications from melanoma at his Ruxton home. He was 77. Mr. Benninghoff was born and raised in Abington, Pa, and during his years at Moreland High School in Willow Grove, Pa., was an outstanding baseball, football and basketball player. After graduating from high school in 1950, he attended Cheshire Academy in Cheshire, Conn.
BUSINESS
By ANDREW LECKEY and ANDREW LECKEY,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | June 18, 2006
Idon't understand why my shares of Procter & Gamble Co. aren't doing better. Please fill me in. -- J.T., via the Internet This consumer-products giant recently launched its Folger's "stomach-friendly" Simply Smooth coffee for those who suffer upset stomachs from drinking coffee. Thirty-five million Americans have cut back their coffee intake because of stomach discomfort, according to the company. But the firm that digested Gillette Co. in a $57 billion acquisition last fall could use a little stomach soothing itself.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 28, 2005
Procter & Gamble Co., the nation's largest consumer products company, reached a deal yesterday to acquire Gillette Co., the maker of batteries and shaving products, for about $55 billion in stock, executives close to the deal said last night. The merger, which is subject to regulatory approval, would create the world's largest consumer products conglomerate, overtaking Unilever, and combine a roster of some of the world's best-known billion-dollar brands including Procter's Tide, Crest and Pampers with Gillette's razors and blades, Right Guard and Duracell.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | October 30, 2002
Procter & Gamble Co., the largest U.S. maker of household goods, reported yesterday that first-quarter profit jumped 33 percent on lower costs and rising sales from the Clairol hair-care unit acquired last year. Net income climbed to $1.46 billion, or $1.04 a share, from $1.1 billion, or 79 cents a share, a year earlier, the company said in a statement. Sales in the three months that ended Sept. 30 rose 11 percent to $10.8 billion. Clairol and Olay skin creams boosted cosmetics and hair-care sales 27 percent, while new varieties of Crest toothpaste and toothbrushes lifted health-care product sales 20 percent.
NEWS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN STAFF | April 7, 1996
If corporate America has become meaner and greedier, some people think Procter & Gamble Co.'s Edwin L. Artzt taught it how.In 1993, while the Cincinnati-based company was booking a record $2 billion in operating profit, Mr. Artzt, the company's chief executive, decided to wipe out 13,000 jobs and close 30 factories.His hit list included a Baltimore plant with 215 employees that made Dawn, Joy and Ivory dish soap."We have a healthy, growing business, a strong balance sheet, positive cash flow, state-of-the-art products," he said.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | December 19, 1995
TORONTO -- Scott Paper Ltd. and Procter & Gamble Co. have reached an out-of-court settlement over claims that P&G's "quicker picker-upper" advertising for Bounty paper towels in Canada are unfair.The companies said they agreed to clarify advertising claims and how Canadian products will be differentiated from those in the United States. Further details of the confidential agreement were not disclosed. Company officials could not be reached for additional comment.Scott had been seeking damages of more than $725,900 in its suit.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | September 6, 2002
NEW YORK - Procter & Gamble Co., the largest U.S. household-goods maker, raised its profit forecast yesterday for the fourth consecutive quarter as it reduces costs and sells more new products such as Crest teeth-whitening strips. Profit in the first quarter, which ends Sept. 30, will rise 14 percent to 16 percent a share, spokeswoman Linda Ulrey said. Last month, the company estimated that earnings would increase by 11 percent to 15 percent. Sales will rise about 7 percent to 9 percent, led by health-care products and emerging markets such as China.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | August 6, 2002
CINCINNATI - Procter & Gamble Co., the largest U.S. household-goods maker, reported a fourth-quarter profit yesterday as sales of its Cover Girl cosmetics and Crest toothbrushes rose. Some investors were disappointed by the company's slower-than-expected revenue growth, although it raised its quarterly profit forecast. Net income was $910 million, or 64 cents a share, compared with a loss of $320 million, or 23 cents, in the corresponding period a year earlier. Sales increased 6.1 percent to $10.2 billion in the three months that ended June 30, less than some analysts' estimates of a gain of as much as 7 percent.
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