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By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,New York Bureau of The Sun | April 11, 1991
NEW YORK -- Procter & Gamble's agreement yesterday to buy Revlon's Max Factor and Betrix cosmetics companies for $1.14 billion could have major implications for Hunt Valley-based Noxell Corp., acquired by Procter & Gamble only 18 months ago.Procter & Gamble has already made several shifts in Noxell's businesses, including transferring to its Cincinnati headquarters responsibility for both Lestoil, a household cleaner, and the international operations for Noxell's cosmetics business. Bigger changes may follow.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2013
David Waldemar Gjerde, a retired Procter & Gamble executive who became a restaurant investor and consultant to his sons, Spike and Charlie, died of a heart attack May 2 at his Cockeysville home. He was 75. Born in Mankato, Minn., he was the son of Waldemar Gjerde, an engineer, and the former Ferne Sorenson, a church organist. Raised in Cedar Falls, Iowa, he earned an engineering degree from the University of Iowa. He served in the Army National Guard. He joined Procter & Gamble in Iowa and moved to Maryland in 1968 with his wife, the former Alice Silletto, and their two sons.
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BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | August 11, 1993
U.S. stocks closed lower for the first time in three sessions yesterday following consumer-products giant Procter & Gamble Co.'s release of lower-than-expected earnings.The decline in stocks was limited somewhat by continued optimism about the slide in long-term interest rates."The Procter & Gamble results definitely spooked the market," said Richard Ciardullo, head trader at Eagle Asset Management Inc., which oversees about $6 billion.The Dow Jones Industrial Average fell 3.35 points to 3,573.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2011
Under Armour is to announce today that it will buy the Tide Point waterfront office complex in Locust Point to serve as a corporate campus, cementing the international sports apparel company's home in Baltimore. The company now occupies nearly half of the 400,000-square-foot Tide Point complex, but for several years it has been on the hunt for a campus, a feature boasted by rival Nike and other sports companies. Under Armour's search has sent executives across the country to study campuses maintained by firms such as Quicksilver, PacSun, Google and Intuit.
BUSINESS
By ANDREW LECKEY and ANDREW LECKEY,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | June 18, 2006
Idon't understand why my shares of Procter & Gamble Co. aren't doing better. Please fill me in. -- J.T., via the Internet This consumer-products giant recently launched its Folger's "stomach-friendly" Simply Smooth coffee for those who suffer upset stomachs from drinking coffee. Thirty-five million Americans have cut back their coffee intake because of stomach discomfort, according to the company. But the firm that digested Gillette Co. in a $57 billion acquisition last fall could use a little stomach soothing itself.
BUSINESS
January 29, 1992
NEW YORK -- The Dow Jones average of 30 industrials closed at a record high yesterday based on the fortunes of two large corporations: Walt Disney and Procter & Gamble.The two companies, major components of the Dow index, saw their stocks soar yesterday following strong fourth-quarter earnings reports. They carried the Dow into record territory, closing up 31.53 at 3,272.14. That topped the previous record close of 3,264.98 set Jan. 17.But the dramatic gains weren't mirrored in the broader market, where advancing issues narrowly outnumbered declines on the New York Stock Exchange.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey | July 31, 1991
Q.My wife and I own 46 shares of Procter & Gamble and would really like to hold on to them. My son-in-law, the investor, says there are better stocks. What do you think?A.This famous company, which recently modified its corporate logo following years of taunts that its intricate design smacked of devil worship, offers heavenly long-term prospects.Hold your shares of Procter & Gamble (around $80 a share, New York Stock Exchange), the household, personal-care and food-product firm, even though it is likely to have flat earnings the next two or three quarters, said Deepak Raj, analyst with Merrill Lynch & Co.It makes sense to buy its shares with a long-term perspective, since its brand-name products are well-liked by loyal consumers.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | November 17, 2001
CINCINNATI - Procter & Gamble Co., the largest U.S. household-goods maker, completed its $4.95 billion purchase of the Clairol hair-care business from Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. yesterday. The company's credit ratings were cut by Standard & Poor's. Procter & Gamble said it will decide how many jobs to eliminate and which factories to close in the next 90 days as it combines operations. Clairol, based in Stamford, Conn., has 4,000 employees. The acquisition is the largest in Procter & Gamble's 164-year history, adding $1.6 billion in annual sales through brands such as Nice 'n Easy and Miss Clairol hair color and Herbal Essences shampoos.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | May 22, 2001
CINCINNATI - Procter & Gamble Co. agreed yesterday to acquire Bristol-Myers Squibb Co.'s Clairol unit for $4.95 billion to begin selling hair coloring, a market with sales growing twice as fast as household products. Clairol's Nice`n Easy, Natural Instincts and Miss Clairol brands will give Procter & Gamble the No. 2 position in the U.S. hair-color market. The cash acquisition is the biggest in Procter & Gamble's 164-year history and will add $1.6 billion in annual sales, the company said.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN STAFF | March 27, 1996
Charles J. Busta, general manager of the Cover Girl makeup line and a longtime executive of Procter & Gamble's cosmetics and fragrance division in Hunt Valley, has accepted a top position with Cover Girl's arch-foe, Revlon Inc.Mr. Busta, who was a Procter & Gamble vice president and general manager, and whose colleagues call him "C.B.," won't be replaced. Cover Girl will be managed directly by Beth Kaplan, Mr. Busta's former boss, who is vice president of cosmetics and fragrance products, said spokeswoman Kimberly Stewart.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | April 2, 2010
Harry Bryner Benninghoff, a retired Procter & Gamble executive who had a happy second career in his retirement working as an Orioles tour guide at Camden Yards, died Saturday of complications from melanoma at his Ruxton home. He was 77. Mr. Benninghoff was born and raised in Abington, Pa, and during his years at Moreland High School in Willow Grove, Pa., was an outstanding baseball, football and basketball player. After graduating from high school in 1950, he attended Cheshire Academy in Cheshire, Conn.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | April 20, 2008
Worried about the economy? Perhaps your family should tighten its belt a bit. Stop using so much soap, for example. Don't clean the kitchen floor quite so frequently. Reduce your dog's food intake by one-fourth. All that probably won't happen. That's why investors during worrisome times often turn to the stocks of companies that produce household necessities. As A.G. Lafley, chief executive of Procter & Gamble Co., said of the recent slowing economy: "People are not reducing tooth-brushing incidence.
BUSINESS
By ANDREW LECKEY and ANDREW LECKEY,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | June 18, 2006
Idon't understand why my shares of Procter & Gamble Co. aren't doing better. Please fill me in. -- J.T., via the Internet This consumer-products giant recently launched its Folger's "stomach-friendly" Simply Smooth coffee for those who suffer upset stomachs from drinking coffee. Thirty-five million Americans have cut back their coffee intake because of stomach discomfort, according to the company. But the firm that digested Gillette Co. in a $57 billion acquisition last fall could use a little stomach soothing itself.
FEATURES
By STEPHANIE SIMON and STEPHANIE SIMON,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 2, 2005
The e-mail alerts zip across the nation, fomenting outrage: Levi-Strauss donates to Planned Parenthood. Don't buy their blue jeans! Johnson & Johnson advertises Tylenol in a gay magazine. Click here to register your disgust! In the past 12 months, conservative advocacy groups have urged their millions of members to stop buying brand after trusted brand. Boycotts have long been a mainstay of both the right and the left, but analysts say there's a new intensity to the protests, as social conservatives test their ability to punish companies for taking liberal stances.
BUSINESS
By ANDREW LECKEY and ANDREW LECKEY,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | October 16, 2005
Procter & Gamble Co. has been a big part of my retirement account for quite some time. Should I continue on with it? - J.D., via the Internet One way of looking at it is that Procter & Gamble is now the proud owner of Gillette Co.'s new five-blade razor, the Fusion. But there's obviously more to it than that: P&G's recently completed $57 billion acquisition of Gillette marries a giant in detergent, beauty aids and toothpaste with a leader in razors and batteries. The resulting global consumer-products company wields awesome marketing and distribution power.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | February 23, 2005
THE FOLKS at Clorox Co. have produced a small miracle of merchandising, and I'm not talking about the paradigm-shattering ToiletWand System. ("Better cleaning with every swipe!") As a consumer products company with less than $5 billion in sales, Clorox has not only avoided being stomped by big competitors (Procter & Gamble, sales of $50 billion) and customers (Wal-Mart, sales of $250 billion), it has mopped up the competition - launching innovations, boosting sales and doubling its stock price in five years.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 28, 2005
Procter & Gamble Co., the nation's largest consumer products company, reached a deal yesterday to acquire Gillette Co., the maker of batteries and shaving products, for about $55 billion in stock, executives close to the deal said last night. The merger, which is subject to regulatory approval, would create the world's largest consumer products conglomerate, overtaking Unilever, and combine a roster of some of the world's best-known billion-dollar brands including Procter's Tide, Crest and Pampers with Gillette's razors and blades, Right Guard and Duracell.
NEWS
By Frank Lynch and Frank Lynch,Staff Writer | September 12, 1993
Procter & Gamble has a contract to lease space for a warehouse-distribution center that will be built on a 38-acre tract on Fashion Court Park in Joppa.Details of the contract with developer Leroy M. Merritt are still being worked out, according to Kerry Desburg, public affairs manager for the Cincinnati-based Procter & Gamble."All I can confirm is that we entered a contract with Mr. Merritt on Aug. 20," she said. "Information concerning the size and cost of the facility, as well as construction dates, will be released as they become available."
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | January 29, 2005
Is bigger better? Business analysts and economists have mixed opinions about the impact of the gargantuan mergers being done or hashed out behind closed doors in recent months, including yesterday's announced $57 billion merger of Procter & Gamble Co. and Gillette Co. The marriages, or contemplated ones, include some of the biggest and most storied names in American business: SBC Communications Inc. and AT&T Corp., the original "Ma Bell"; retail giants Federated Department Stores and May Department Stores; wireless providers Sprint Corp.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 28, 2005
Procter & Gamble Co., the nation's largest consumer products company, reached a deal yesterday to acquire Gillette Co., the maker of batteries and shaving products, for about $55 billion in stock, executives close to the deal said last night. The merger, which is subject to regulatory approval, would create the world's largest consumer products conglomerate, overtaking Unilever, and combine a roster of some of the world's best-known billion-dollar brands including Procter's Tide, Crest and Pampers with Gillette's razors and blades, Right Guard and Duracell.
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