Advertisement
HomeCollectionsProcessed Foods
IN THE NEWS

Processed Foods

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By FRANK D. ROYLANCE and FRANK D. ROYLANCE,SUN REPORTER | June 23, 2006
Americans who push their salt shakers away at home, only to be swamped by salt in take-out and restaurant fare, may get some help cutting back on the condiment. That's important, because we need salt to live - but in high doses, salt can worsen high blood pressure and increase the risk of heart disease and stroke. The American Medical Association has adopted four recommendations seeking federal regulation of the salt in processed foods and restaurant meals. The doctors group is also calling for new public education efforts and a new label - a bright red salt shaker - to warn consumers when food portions are high in salt.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2013
After buying Fractured Prune Doughnuts in January, Dan Brinton switched to an oil without trans fats to fry the chain's hand-dipped glazed doughnuts. "It's a little more expensive, but it's certainly worth it as far as I'm concerned," said Brinton, CEO of the growing Ocean City -based chain, on Thursday. Earlier in the day, the Food and Drug Administration moved to virtually eliminate trans fat, an artificially created artery-clogging substance, from Americans' diets. The move follows a massive effort by food makers and restaurant chains to remove the substance over the past decade, as consumers become more educated about risks and vote for healthier alternatives with their wallets.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 27, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The Clinton administration introduced legislation yesterday that would overhaul food safety and pesticide laws by relaxing the standards for cancer-causing chemicals in processed foods and phasing out the use of hazardous pesticides on fresh fruits and vegetables.The proposal, which was crafted by the Environmental Protection Agency, the Department of Agriculture and the Food and Drug Administration, would encourage farmers to use safer pest-control methods, while placing new restrictions on the use of chemical pesticides.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan
The Baltimore Sun
| October 12, 2013
A technical glitch left shoppers who rely on food stamps to buy their groceries unable to pay at many supermarkets for much of the day Saturday. A spokeswoman for Xerox, which runs the benefits system in Maryland and 16 other states, said the underlying problem had been fixed Saturday afternoon but some stores were still experience problems. Brian M. Schleter, a spokesman for the Maryland Department of Human Resources, which is responsible for the EBT - or Electronic Benefits Transfer - card system, confirmed the problem.
NEWS
May 22, 1995
Not only is America a land of abundant food, it is also a country rightly proud of the safety of its food supply. Because of strict federal regulations, consumers can pick whatever they want off the grocery shelves and feed themselves or their families without worrying about contamination.Even so, effective food regulations depend on a good balance between science and practicality, and the scientific underpinnings of some current regulations are sorely outdated. Legislation now pending in Congress is aimed at that problem, particularly as it relates to the so-called "Delaney Clause," which sets a "zero tolerance" level for any additive, including pesticides, detected in processed foods, if that substance has been shown to cause cancer in laboratory animals at any level.
FEATURES
By Edwin Chen and Edwin Chen,Los Angeles Times | May 3, 1994
The federal government, joined by an array of health and consumer groups, unveiled a huge education campaign yesterday to encourage Americans to use the new and vastly simplified nutritional labels that soon will be on all processed foods -- from potato chips and candy to salad dressing and processed meat and poultry products."
FEATURES
By Kim Pierce and Kim Pierce,Universal Press Syndicate | October 12, 1994
From TV ads to eye-level store displays, kids get the message to buy and eat high-fat, sugar, processed foods -- not exactly the building blocks of good nutrition.And although government, consumer groups and the food and TV industries have begun looking at ways to channel more nutrition information to kids, most experts agree parents are still the food gatekeepers -- at home, at stores, in restaurants.Good -- or poor -- nutrition and eating habits form early, they say. Lifetime habits are set by age 12. And parents play a big role in establishing good habits.
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre, R.D. and Colleen Pierre, R.D.,Contributing Writer | August 11, 1992
Little kids know a lot about good nutrition."Kids Make the Nutritional Grade," a survey of 6- to 9-year-olds released today by the International Food Information Council, shows that young children have a good grasp of the ideas of balance, variety and moderation.They know they should eat carrots more often than candy, and bananas more often than ice cream.That's what they know.But what do they do?They rag on ther parents to buy the food they see advertised on TV, either all the time (27 percent)
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau | December 3, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The Bush administration yesterday announced a new food labeling system requiring manufacturers to disclose more nutritional information on almost all packaged and processed foods.The new labels -- the focus of a bitter dispute within the administration -- should begin appearing in stores next year and should be on all containers and packets by May 1994, at an estimated cost of $2 billion to the industry. Restaurant menus are excluded from the new regulations to avoid turning them into book-length documents.
NEWS
By Scott Kahan | May 1, 2007
A long-running contradiction in U.S. farm policy is fattening the waistlines of Americans and the profits of agribusiness at the same time. For the 30 years that the U.S. Department of Agriculture has been issuing dietary guidelines, there has been a stark inconsistency between the federal government's advice and its food funding. True, the USDA has been doing more, over time, to promote health through dietary guidelines, food pyramids and other nutrition programs. And yet more than $20 billion yearly - more than one-fifth its budget - is sunk into a farm bill that supports many of the foods its recommendations warn against.
NEWS
By Emily Nunn and Emily Nunn,Chicago Tribune | January 7, 2009
Any parent not vexed by the amount of time, worry and finesse required to feed a child well these days is either the inventor of the food pyramid or is rich enough to employ a nanny/nutritionist/professional chef/circus clown. Which is to say, almost everyone needs help, whether they know it or not. So, when we get invited to serve on President-elect Barack Obama's Really Great Idea Committee, we'll suggest issuing all parents a copy of Tracey Seaman and Tanya Wenman Steel's Real Food for Healthy Kids (William Morrow, $29.95)
FEATURES
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,Sun reporter | April 3, 2008
It can take more than a commitment to eat right these days. It can also take some research before you head to the grocery. Is there a difference between "low fat" and "fat free"? Is "natural" the same as "organic"? Is "whole wheat" the same as "100 percent whole grain"? The short answer: Words matter. The government specifically defines some labels but not others, the food industry makes up some of its own rules, and consumers are left to make sense of it all. The consequences can be significant.
NEWS
By Nicole Gaouette and Nicole Gaouette,Los Angeles Times | November 25, 2007
WASHINGTON -- When Ann Cooper took over the lunch program for the Berkeley, Calif., schools, she found children eating chicken nuggets and Tater Tots ("Pre-flash fried with corn fillers and corn coating," she tut-tutted). There was also canned fruit cocktail and chocolate milk ("both with high-fructose corn syrup"). The lunches averaged 800 to 900 calories, much higher than federal guidelines, and were loaded with salt. "That is just crazy in a world of obesity," Cooper said. Cooper instituted roast chicken, a salad bar, fresh fruit, vegetables and low-fat milk.
NEWS
By Stephen J. Hedges and Stephen J. Hedges,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 10, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Amid concerns about the safety of pet food ingredients and catfish from China, consumers and even a few members of Congress are wondering why there isn't a law that requires merchants to label where food comes from. The short answer: There is. And there has been since 2002. The more complicated answer is that what Congress passes, Congress can take away. The requirement for "country-of-origin labeling" - or COOL, as Washington knows it - for food products was postponed a year after its adoption because of heavy lobbying from food groups saying that the law was unnecessary and expensive.
NEWS
By Scott Kahan | May 1, 2007
A long-running contradiction in U.S. farm policy is fattening the waistlines of Americans and the profits of agribusiness at the same time. For the 30 years that the U.S. Department of Agriculture has been issuing dietary guidelines, there has been a stark inconsistency between the federal government's advice and its food funding. True, the USDA has been doing more, over time, to promote health through dietary guidelines, food pyramids and other nutrition programs. And yet more than $20 billion yearly - more than one-fifth its budget - is sunk into a farm bill that supports many of the foods its recommendations warn against.
NEWS
By FRANK D. ROYLANCE and FRANK D. ROYLANCE,SUN REPORTER | June 23, 2006
Americans who push their salt shakers away at home, only to be swamped by salt in take-out and restaurant fare, may get some help cutting back on the condiment. That's important, because we need salt to live - but in high doses, salt can worsen high blood pressure and increase the risk of heart disease and stroke. The American Medical Association has adopted four recommendations seeking federal regulation of the salt in processed foods and restaurant meals. The doctors group is also calling for new public education efforts and a new label - a bright red salt shaker - to warn consumers when food portions are high in salt.
FEATURES
By Seattle Times | July 7, 1991
Look for more processed foods to show up with "organic" on the label, predict industry insiders.Processing takes organics beyond the fresh-produce aisle and serves up the ready-made convenience Americans crave. And it solves a problem: Fresh organic produce that's often not picture-perfect, partly because it's not treated for long shelf life.Washington's Cascadian Farm is an industry leader, producing many processed products from organically grown fruits and vegetables that are sold nationally.
NEWS
August 6, 1992
Here's a scary statistic to chew on: Children in the United States, on average, get about half their daily calories from fat. That's much more than the federal recommendation for fat intake in most diets. Even that 30 percent guideline is considered too generous by some nutrition experts.The Washington-based Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI), a non-profit organization serving as a watchdog of the food industry, has published a new report contending that American kids are in flabby shape because their diets contain too many fatty meats and snacks, sugar-laden breakfast cereals and other processed foods.
NEWS
May 22, 1995
Not only is America a land of abundant food, it is also a country rightly proud of the safety of its food supply. Because of strict federal regulations, consumers can pick whatever they want off the grocery shelves and feed themselves or their families without worrying about contamination.Even so, effective food regulations depend on a good balance between science and practicality, and the scientific underpinnings of some current regulations are sorely outdated. Legislation now pending in Congress is aimed at that problem, particularly as it relates to the so-called "Delaney Clause," which sets a "zero tolerance" level for any additive, including pesticides, detected in processed foods, if that substance has been shown to cause cancer in laboratory animals at any level.
FEATURES
By Kim Pierce and Kim Pierce,Universal Press Syndicate | October 12, 1994
From TV ads to eye-level store displays, kids get the message to buy and eat high-fat, sugar, processed foods -- not exactly the building blocks of good nutrition.And although government, consumer groups and the food and TV industries have begun looking at ways to channel more nutrition information to kids, most experts agree parents are still the food gatekeepers -- at home, at stores, in restaurants.Good -- or poor -- nutrition and eating habits form early, they say. Lifetime habits are set by age 12. And parents play a big role in establishing good habits.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.