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NEWS
February 13, 2010
Former president Bill Clinton was released Friday morning from a New York hospital, where he stayed overnight after doctors inserted two stents into a clogged coronary artery after he complained of chest pains. The one-hour procedure went smoothly, according to his cardiologist. Clinton, 63, was released from New York Presbyterian Hospital's campus at Columbia University early Friday morning "in excellent health" and will soon return to his work on Haiti's relief and long-term recovery, his office said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
The state's Mental Hygiene Administration didn't have adequate procedures to ensure consumers given care were eligible, according to audit by the Department of Legislative Services during fiscal 2013. The state funds in question totaled $16.4 million. The total budget that year was $788 million when federal funds were counted. The audit also found reviews weren't done in a timely manner by an accounting firm hired to monitor some of the agency's fiscal functions, with some reviews taking up to an extra 21 months.
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SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2012
Orioles catcher Taylor Teagarden, acquired in the offseason to be a veteran reserve to Matt Wieters, said Tuesday that he's about 85 percent healthy after having two procedures on his right knee. Teagarden had a Baker's cyst - a buildup of joint fluid - behind his right knee removed in November. Doctors had to perform another procedure in the knee to remove blood that was forming in the back of the knee and affecting his range of motion. “That's all behind me now, and now it's just a strengthening phase and getting into baseball shape,” Teagarden said.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
A raucous tailgate last weekend in which students were dancing on the roofs of cars and were "hostile" and "uncooperative" prompted Towson University officials to consider banning student tailgating at football games the rest of the season. Though officials ultimately decided Wednesday to reject such a ban, they will discuss with student leaders over the next several days potential changes to the college's tailgating policy and its enforcement prior to football games at Johnny Unitas Stadium.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2014
Chandler Crews sat on a bench outside of Sinai Hospital in Baltimore one recent day, put her feet on the ground and grinned. Sitting this way was impossible for the 20-year-old from Arkansas just a few years ago because she was born with achondroplasia, a form of dwarfism in which limbs don't grow in proportion with the torso. With bowed legs and a 3-foot-10-inch stature, she said she was unable to do many such "normal" things. She couldn't drive the family car or go for much of a walk without back and joint pain or even wash her hands in most sinks.
NEWS
December 4, 1990
Harbor Hospital Center recently began performing an innovative gall bladder procedure, called the laparoscopic cholecystectomy, a procedure previously available only at large research institutions.The operation includes the use of video monitors and specialized surgical instruments to dissect and extract the gall bladder through a tiny incision in the patient's navel.In the recent past, most patients who had gall bladder surgery required a long and painful recovery process, since surgeons had to cut through stomach muscles to reach the gall bladder.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 27, 1994
An evaluation of more than 6,000 children scheduled to have tubes placed in their ears to combat recurrent ear infections indicates that the procedure is inappropriate in about one-quarter of cases and of questionable benefit in another third.The children in the study ranged in age from 22 days to 16 years.The finding suggests that each year hundreds of thousands of children who undergo the tube procedure are unlikely to benefit from it and some may even be harmed.
NEWS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,Special to the Sun | August 15, 2004
For Liz Abate, choosing a new medical treatment without much of a track record was not as scary as the way she was living. Abate suffered from gastroesophageal reflux disease, better known as GERD. The Towson resident had to sleep sitting up because of severe heartburn. And not keeping food down was a common problem at all times of the day. She took medicine and followed a strict diet of eating little or no fried, spicy or acidic foods. And she made sure she ate early in the evening, well before she went to bed. But instead of medication and lifestyle changes helping, her problem worsened.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN STAFF | March 27, 1999
The Maryland Senate voted yesterday to ban a late-term abortion procedure, the first time either chamber of the General Assembly has approved a major abortion restriction since the U.S. Supreme Court's 1973 Roe vs. Wade decision.The 25-22 vote sends the measure to the House, where another close vote is expected if the issue reaches the floor.Gov. Parris N. Glendening has pledged to veto the legislation because it does not include an exception to allow the procedure -- termed "partial-birth abortion" by opponents -- to protect a mother's health.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 9, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Abortion-rights advocates in the Senate yesterday derailed a controversial bill that would outlaw "partial-birth" abortions, a development that abortion foes conceded was a resounding defeat for their legislative agenda.The anti-abortion bill, passed overwhelmingly by the House last week, was sent to the Senate Judiciary Committee, where the measure is certain to be significantly altered, with perhaps the most controversial provisions deleted.As written, the legislation would ban a rare but gruesome procedure associated with late-term abortions -- making it the first medical procedure ever to be banned by Congress.
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2014
Orioles right-hander Kevin Gausman was optioned to the club's Rookie-level Gulf Coast League team after Wednesday night's 3-1 loss to the Tampa Bay Rays at Camden Yards. A corresponding move will be made before Thursday's series finale. Gausman allowed three runs (two earned) and six hits in four innings before being removed from the game after 80 pitches in the loss, but the roster move is not related to his performance. He was informed of the move in manager Buck Showalter's office shortly after the game.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | July 9, 2014
Minimally invasive surgery leads to fewer infections and other complications than traditional open surgery but not all hospitals are regularly offering such procedures, according to a new study from Johns Hopkins University.  The researchers looked at a database of more than seven million hospitals stays at more than 1,000 hospitals and found laparoscopic methods were underused in several specific surgeries -- appendectomies, colectomies and hysterectomies, which studies have shown have better outcomes when they are done using minimally invasive techniques.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2014
Extra attention to hygiene means fewer germs are infecting people in health care settings these days, but particularly hardy bacteria called Clostridium difficile are defying the trend - and even gaining in strength. Patients endure round after round of antibiotics to knock out the bug, known as C. diff., which causes abdominal pain, extreme diarrhea and potentially fatal inflammation of the colon. Increasingly, however, doctors are turning to a cure that may seem every bit as yucky as the problem.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2014
It wasn't easy to get suspected Black Guerrilla Family leader Gerald Johnson on the phone, investigators learned as they tried to build a case against him last year. Rather than answer calls himself, he would often use a female associate to screen his conversations. The conversations would often play out like this one summarized in court documents: "Where Geezy at?" a suspected gang member asked, using Johnson's nickname. After a woman replied, he continued, "Put him on the phone.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2014
Chandler Crews sat on a bench outside of Sinai Hospital in Baltimore one recent day, put her feet on the ground and grinned. Sitting this way was impossible for the 20-year-old from Arkansas just a few years ago because she was born with achondroplasia, a form of dwarfism in which limbs don't grow in proportion with the torso. With bowed legs and a 3-foot-10-inch stature, she said she was unable to do many such "normal" things. She couldn't drive the family car or go for much of a walk without back and joint pain or even wash her hands in most sinks.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan | April 7, 2014
The former owner of St. Joseph Medical Center has agreed to pay up to $37 million to resolve allegations that cardiologist Mark G. Midei put hundreds of patients through unnecessary heart stent procedures, according to court documents. As many as 273 patients stand to get payments of at least $134,000 before lawyers' and other fees. The settlement represents a major step toward resolution after more than four years of court fights that began when St. Joseph informed hundreds of people that their surgeries might not have been needed.
SPORTS
By Heather A. Dinich | October 23, 2006
It was third-and-eight for North Carolina State in the second quarter Saturday when fullback Toney Baker broke loose on a 15-yard run that might or might not have ended with a fumble forced by Josh Wilson. Florida State@Maryland Saturday, 7 p.m., ESPN2, 1300 AM, 105.7 FM Line: Florida State by 5
NEWS
By LAURA KING and LAURA KING,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 27, 2005
JERUSALEM -- Prime Minister Ariel Sharon will soon undergo a medical procedure meant to mend a tiny hole in his heart which may have contributed to his minor stroke this month, his doctors announced yesterday. The doctors described the planned catheterization procedure as the most common method of treating such a heart condition, which they said was a birth defect of a type that occurs in up to 25 percent of the population. No date was set for the procedure, but doctors said it would take place within the next three weeks.
NEWS
March 5, 2014
Statistics suggest that every year thousands of people are convicted and sentenced to prison for crimes they didn't commit because witnesses falsely identified them in police lineups or photo arrays. It is a testament to the fallibility and malleability of human memory that witnesses regularly err in recalling what they saw or heard even when convinced the testimony they give is truthful. Too often, it appears, the result is that innocent people end up behind bars while the real perpetrators remain free to commit more crimes.
NEWS
By Drew Greenblatt | January 27, 2014
Earlier this month, the powerful Senate Finance Committee met to consider crucial legislation that would grant the president Trade Promotion Authority (TPA), which would make it easier for him to negotiate deals with other countries. Maryland's own Sen. Ben Cardin, who sits on that committee, will help decide whether the United States continues to lead the world in promoting jobs and market-opening trade deals or whether it falls behind. TPA is a common sense procedural agreement between the legislative and executive branches of government, and every president since Franklin Roosevelt has had it, according to the National Association of Manufacturers, where I'm an executive board member.
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