Advertisement
HomeCollectionsProcaccini
IN THE NEWS

Procaccini

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,Staff Writer | January 10, 1993
In less than two full seasons, Old Mill senior Marc Procaccini has undergone a transformation from a "musclehead," to a "heady" wrestler.Procaccini was coaxed into wrestling by his older brother, Gabe, as a Gilman School eighth-grader. His skills remained mediocre until transferring to Old Mill as a sophomore just before the county tournament.By the end of last season, however, Procaccini was a smooth technician.He reeled off 23 straight victories en route to a 28-2-1 state championship season that helped the Patriots capture an unprecedented fourth straight state title.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By LUKE BROADWATER and LUKE BROADWATER,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 21, 2005
Headed into the finals of the Dec. 10 Bowie Duals, the chances of victory for the Broadneck wrestling team were bleak. The unranked Bruins found themselves face-to-face with the Golden Bears of Hammond, the defending Class 2A-1A state dual meet champions, who carried with them a 31-match winning streak and a No. 3 ranking. "I'm not going to lie," said Mike Vakas, a 135-pound senior captain at Broadneck. "We were so nervous. The whole team was nervous. Our families were nervous. Our friends were nervous.
Advertisement
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,Staff Writer | December 7, 1992
Marc Procaccini pulled off what was perhaps the acting job of his life, and with it, he nearly gained an equally impressive victory.Old Mill's third-ranked, defending 4A-3A state champion Procaccini trailed Mount St. Joseph's second-ranked Danny DeVivo, 4-1, in their title bout of the Annapolis tournament Saturday night, when the two wrestlers -- locked in a clinch -- approached the edge of the mat with 10 seconds remaining in the second period."
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | April 12, 2002
From the time she was a child and watched her father change the lives of his high school science students, Mattie Procaccini wanted nothing more than to be a teacher. "He was a sensitive man," she said of her father, who died in January, "who humbly but eloquently conveyed, through both his words and deeds, the sanctity of his profession and the dignity of all those he taught." Procaccini, 59, took those lessons and applied them to her teaching career, largely spent at Old Mill High School in Millersville.
FEATURES
By Mary Maushard | October 9, 1990
MANY PARENTS are looking for ways to make their jobs easier and their skills more effective. Joseph Procaccini offers these two tricks of the trade gleaned from his years as a parent, a professor of education and a student of families:* Always say "yes" to children, even though it has the same effect as a no."May I take your car and go to Ocean City for the weekend?" asks your teen-ager. "Yes, when you are 23," says a father, following Procaccini's advice.Children hear "no" so often, it's a relief for them to get a "yes" once in a while, he says.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Staff Writer | May 1, 1992
Most Baltimore-area employers aren't "family-friendly," a Loyola College survey has concluded.In a survey of 318 area employers, Joseph Procaccini, director of Loyola's Center for Family, Work and Education, said he found most companies in the area don't provide benefits that help workers take care of family responsibilities."
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Staff Writer | May 1, 1992
Most Baltimore-area employers aren't "family-friendly," a Loyola College survey has concluded.In a survey of 318 area employers, Joseph Procaccini, director of Loyola's Center for Family, Work and Education, said he found most companies in the area don't provide benefits that help workers take care of family responsibilities."
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | April 12, 2002
From the time she was a child and watched her father change the lives of his high school science students, Mattie Procaccini wanted nothing more than to be a teacher. "He was a sensitive man," she said of her father, who died in January, "who humbly but eloquently conveyed, through both his words and deeds, the sanctity of his profession and the dignity of all those he taught." Procaccini, 59, took those lessons and applied them to her teaching career, largely spent at Old Mill High School in Millersville.
FEATURES
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,Evening Sun Staff | October 9, 1990
THE TERRIBLE toos afflict children of all ages.Too many expectations.Too many media images of perfection.Too many fears.Too much guilt brought on by too many "shoulds."These "toos" douse the energy and enthusiasm of too many fired-up kids.And they ignite another terrible too -- too much burnout, a malady that has affected parents for some time and has now spread to their children, some as young as 7 or 8."Twenty to 30 percent of kids experience some kind of burnout," says Joseph Procaccini, associate professor of education at Loyola College and the author of two parenting books.
NEWS
By Patrick Ercolano and Patrick Ercolano,Evening Sun Staff | September 5, 1991
An old classroom device for remembering the different spellings of principle and principal goes, "Our principal is our pal."According to Joseph Procaccini, professor of education at Loyola College, that old memory device has come to sum up the current principal-student relationship."
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,Staff Writer | February 28, 1993
Just when you think you've done enough -- you haven't. Making demands on his team, says No. 14 Walbrook's coach Wavie Gibson, is a sure method of improvement.His philosophy worked in yesterday's Class 4A-3A Region IV tournament at Meade. Gibson's two-time Maryland Scholastic Association B-Conference champion Warriors (12-0, 108 points) qualified six of nine wrestlers -- with 11 overall from the city -- for a surprising third-place finish for their inaugural venture into next weekend's state meet.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,Staff Writer | January 10, 1993
In less than two full seasons, Old Mill senior Marc Procaccini has undergone a transformation from a "musclehead," to a "heady" wrestler.Procaccini was coaxed into wrestling by his older brother, Gabe, as a Gilman School eighth-grader. His skills remained mediocre until transferring to Old Mill as a sophomore just before the county tournament.By the end of last season, however, Procaccini was a smooth technician.He reeled off 23 straight victories en route to a 28-2-1 state championship season that helped the Patriots capture an unprecedented fourth straight state title.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,Staff Writer | December 7, 1992
Marc Procaccini pulled off what was perhaps the acting job of his life, and with it, he nearly gained an equally impressive victory.Old Mill's third-ranked, defending 4A-3A state champion Procaccini trailed Mount St. Joseph's second-ranked Danny DeVivo, 4-1, in their title bout of the Annapolis tournament Saturday night, when the two wrestlers -- locked in a clinch -- approached the edge of the mat with 10 seconds remaining in the second period."
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Staff Writer | May 1, 1992
Most Baltimore-area employers aren't "family-friendly," a Loyola College survey has concluded.In a survey of 318 area employers, Joseph Procaccini, director of Loyola's Center for Family, Work and Education, said he found most companies in the area don't provide benefits that help workers take care of family responsibilities."
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Staff Writer | May 1, 1992
Most Baltimore-area employers aren't "family-friendly," a Loyola College survey has concluded.In a survey of 318 area employers, Joseph Procaccini, director of Loyola's Center for Family, Work and Education, said he found most companies in the area don't provide benefits that help workers take care of family responsibilities."
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,Staff Writer Jeff Seidel contributed to this article | March 9, 1992
WESTMINSTER -- Matt Slutzky threw back his head, raised his hands and absorbed the applause from the standing crowd of 10,000 at the Western Maryland College gymnasium.With his 13-1 Class 4A-3A state championship victory Saturday night over Charles County's McDonough's Larry Green, last year's state tournament runner-up, the 135-pound Aberdeen wrestler became Maryland's first four-time state champion. Slutzky, a senior with an "A" average, had won his previous titles at 119, 125 and 130 pounds.
NEWS
By Michael J. Clark and Michael J. Clark,Howard County Bureau of The Sun | August 19, 1991
Joseph Procaccini wants to make American society "family-friendly."That's why the 49-year-old graduate professor of education and management at Loyola College has embarked on what may seem a mission impossible at a time of high divorce rates and profound changes in family life.Dr. Procaccini, an author of parenting books and a lecturer on business leadership and education, has initiated the Center for Family, Work and Education at Loyola's Business Center campus in Columbia.The newly founded center will provide training in parenting skills, lobby for pro-family legislation and work to convince schools and businesses to be more family-oriented, he said.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,Staff Writer | February 28, 1993
Just when you think you've done enough -- you haven't. Making demands on his team, says No. 14 Walbrook's coach Wavie Gibson, is a sure method of improvement.His philosophy worked in yesterday's Class 4A-3A Region IV tournament at Meade. Gibson's two-time Maryland Scholastic Association B-Conference champion Warriors (12-0, 108 points) qualified six of nine wrestlers -- with 11 overall from the city -- for a surprising third-place finish for their inaugural venture into next weekend's state meet.
NEWS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,Staff writer | March 9, 1992
Old Mill's Marc Procaccini is probably the last person who thought he'd be the only individual titlist on Maryland's first four-time Class 4A-3A state champion wrestling team.And Procaccini, a junior who transferred from Baltimore's Gilman School, still couldn't believe it as he stood on the victory podium with camera lights flashing in his eyes. Even while cradling in his victory plaque in his lap later, he had trouble absorbing the fact that he earned the title of the state's best Class 4A-3A level 160-pound wrestler.
FEATURES
By Lynn Williams | January 20, 1992
Imagine a corporation in which none of the employees has been trained for their jobs. Not only have the CEOs received no schooling, but they have only the remotest idea of their company's objectives, and no clear plans for reaching them. Relying on instinct, tradition and idle advice picked up at the supermarket or health club, they attempt to pilot their firm through the treacherous shoals of the 1990s.Now imagine such a corporation actually thriving. Pretty far-fetched, right? Clearly, such a rudderless ship is on a one-way trip to Belly-Up City.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.