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NEWS
January 26, 2012
Regarding Paula Simon's recent commentary regarding how vendors respond to a customer's thank-you ("The problem with 'no problem,'" Jan. 25), she might be interested to know that in French, Spanish, and Italian, appropriate responses to "thank you" are, respectively, "de rien" "de nada," and "di niente. " All of these phrases literally mean "it's nothing," linguistically closer to "no problem" than to "you're welcome. " Does that make these cultures deficient in civility relative to English-speaking cultures?
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 8, 2014
The recent coverage of police brutality in Baltimore has been unnerving ( "Civil wrongs," Oct. 5). However, the recent column by Dan Rodricks reflects exactly how disgusted I've been with every other area of city governance. Mr. Rodricks points out how the police commissioner and Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake turn a blind eye to paying fines and never delving into the problem ( "Mayor should have seen troubling brutality trend," Oct. 5). But to raise taxes to cover the consequences while raising their salaries and enjoying all the "perks" of office is not fixing the problem.
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NEWS
March 26, 2012
Maryland revenues have steadily increased over the last four years, yet Gov.Martin O'Malley's administration continues to bemoan budget shortfalls. Maryland doesn't have a revenue problem; this administration has a spending problem. A spending problem that Governor O'Malley intends to solve by raising taxes. He's also proposing a 6 percent sales tax on gas while prices at the pump are topping $3.75 a gallon. Governor O'Malley, please stop trying to solve Maryland's budget shortfalls by loading the burden onto the backs of Maryland taxpayers.
NEWS
By Justin George and The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
Joy remembers the day that risking a few dollars for fun turned into a rush she couldn't control. It was Feb. 14, 2000, at the casino in Charles Town, W.Va. She plunked some money into a slot machine, and out came hundreds of dollars - and the start of an addiction she could never satisfy. "I went out with $30 and went home with $400 and that's all she wrote," she said. Like an alcoholic who needs more drinks to get drunk, she needed to wager ever larger sums to recapture the thrill.
NEWS
January 29, 2012
I loved Paula Simon's recent commentary on the phrase "No problem" ("The problem with 'no problem,'" Jan. 25). My own pet peeve regards the grammatically incorrect response of "good" when someone asks "how are you?" This response is pervasive even among educated people. The dictionary makes it quite clear that a response of "good" is appropriate in many instances but never when conveying one's well-being. Unfortunately, I sense that the correct response - "fine, thank you" - is a thing of the past, as the English language continues to be slaughtered.
NEWS
February 7, 2012
Regarding the answer by Helen Glazer to Paula Simon's commentary on "no problem" ("The problem with 'no problem,'" Jan. 25), I agree with Ms. Simon's judgment of this phrase, but I would go even further. The problem with "no problem" is the idea that what you did may indeed have been a problem, but I have generously judged that it is not, or it is but I forgive you. This implies that you might be at fault, and I am somehow morally superior to you. As to Ms. Glazer's response, I think she is missing the point.
NEWS
January 25, 2013
Letter writer Steve Buff writes that military spending is bankrupting the country ("Military spending is bankrupting the country," Jan. 20). But according to the Congressional Budget Office, military spending doesn't appear to be the problem. The CBO says that federal receipts for fiscal 2012 are $2.5 trillion but that federal outlays are $3.6 trillion. That's a $1.1 trillion deficit. Of the $3.6 trillion being spent, 57 percent is for entitlements. Defense (of which military spending is but a part)
NEWS
October 10, 2012
In a letter to the editor ("Experience counts," Oct. 8), Mike Callahan writes that President Barack Obama "can't work with Congress and overrides congressional laws and regulations. " Is it possible that he cannot work with a Congress that has chosen not to work with him? This is a Congress, fueled by a tea party, that has decided not to believe in compromise and has vowed to make him a one-term president. These people are so dogmatic in their attitudes that they cannot work with anyone who may disagree with them.
NEWS
May 1, 2012
I cannot understand what passes through the minds of people at The Sun when it comes to taxes and government spending. A recent front page headline declared that "Millions slip away from city as condo values set too low" (April 29). But how can a condo that was never sold owe "full taxes" even though it is not a significant drain on government resources? There is no trash, mail, sewer, education or medical demands from a unit that has never had an owner beyond the builder, and for which basic fire and police service needs are also minimal.
NEWS
March 12, 2014
After reading the "Another budget setback" editorial in Tuesday's Sun, I sense that the editors have lost contact with reality and refuse to recognize the real problem with this state and nation - Dumbocrat rule. F. Cordell, Lutherville - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
October 3, 2014
Maryland's legislature decided to decriminalize possession of small amounts of marijuana for a few reasons. Lawmakers concluded that police and prosecutors should not be focusing their attention on what is increasingly viewed by the public as a relatively harmless vice; they expressed concern that criminal convictions related to marijuana possession were harming the employment and educational prospects of thousands of Marylanders; and they were alarmed...
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
Danyette Hawkins had to employ her best diplomatic skills as she stood in front of the Grand parking garage on Paca Street holding a bright-colored flag before the game. Every few minutes, a driver would pull up to enter the garage. Hawkins would have to explain that the garage — popular among fans when the team plays at night — was still filled with daytime business parkers. Then she would wave her flag and the car would move on. Some of the fans appeared frustrated.
NEWS
October 2, 2014
Something key has been lost in the debate about the future direction of the University of Maryland University College - its confusing name ( "UMUC should focus on education, not business ," Sept, 18). If it's really meant be a "college," perhaps in the same overkill spirit of its current name it should be called the "University of Maryland College College. " That way, no one would be confused about what it is. If, on the other hand, it's really a "university," then the "University of the University of Maryland University" might be more apt. Can we get a ruling on this key part of the institution's future from the Department of Redundancy Department?
FEATURES
Chris Kaltenbach, Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
Faced with Friday's early afternoon playoff game, school officials and business owners in the Baltimore area are preparing for a day of empty classrooms and vacant work spaces. Sort of. "I don't know how big the number is, but there will definitely be some kids out," predicted Gilman School Headmaster Henry Smyth, himself an Orioles fan with tickets for Friday's game who faced the quandary of what to do. He and his two boys will not be going to the game, Smyth said. But he understands if some parents decide to make baseball the priority.
NEWS
September 29, 2014
Dreary job reports coupled with the news that Maryland is projecting $405 million in less revenue for the current fiscal year and the next has caused the O'Malley/Brown cheerleaders at The Sun to put on the pompoms and go into full attack mode ( "Apocalypse? Not now," Sept. 26). Various explanations are offered either in articles or editorials rationalizing the inability to eliminate the proclaimed structural deficit, including: the sequestration, federal budget cuts, lots of other states have the same problem, the dog ate the homework, etc. Missing in the analysis of The Sun is the one explanation that is right before everyone's eyes: Maryland is spending too much money.
NEWS
By Darian G. Burns | September 29, 2014
Ray Rice is not the only NFL player currently dealing with a suspension. Unless you have been living under a rock, you have heard by now that Minnesota Vikings running back Adrian Peterson was indicted for child abuse after taking a switch to his 4-year-old child's back, buttocks and legs. In response to the indictment Mr. Peterson, like Mr. Rice, was suspended, then reinstated and then suspended again from playing. Mr. Peterson denies that what he did was abuse. He defends himself, says he was simply disciplining a child and that, yes, he did get carried away in that discipline.
NEWS
June 3, 2013
From following the news lately, it seems that we have two problems that might actually lead to a solution. You've been devoting a lot of ink to the Black Guerrilla Family gang problem at the Baltimore City Detention Center ("Reach of BGF gang extends past city," May 31), and also to the continuing debate over the use of drones to kill people ("Setting limits on drones," May 24). Why not use one problem to solve the other? It seems to me the big problem with this gang is that law enforcement has no tools to effectively fight it. But what if we used drones to take care of the problem?
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | September 27, 2014
On  his Fox News show  Monday night, Bill O'Reilly suggested using mercenaries to fight the Islamic State (ISIS) instead of U.S. ground forces, which President Obama has repeatedly vowed not to deploy. The use of mercenaries is as old as warfare itself. Alexander the Great used them. King George III hired German mercenaries to fight for the British in the American Revolution. Today  mercenaries go by other names, like “contractor . " The president is to be commended for assembling a coalition that includes Arab states, but why are more of  our European allies not part of it?
NEWS
By Donald Boesch and Edward Maibach | September 25, 2014
George Mason University research, released jointly with the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, shows that roughly three quarters of Marylanders understand that climate change is a threat to our health, homes, businesses and natural resources, and more than half of them support state initiatives to address the problem. Now, with elections less than two months away, it's time to ensure we continue to move forward. Maryland is highly vulnerable, with more than 3,000 miles of coastline.
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