Advertisement
HomeCollectionsProbate Court
IN THE NEWS

Probate Court

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By Liz Pulliam and Liz Pulliam,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 16, 2000
I am married with two children, and I am concerned what would happen to our estate if my wife and I both died in an accident. Do we really need a living trust to avoid going to probate court before our minor children can inherit any assets? Probably yes. Probably, because chances are you wouldn't want to use the more common ways to avoid probate, since minor children are involved. Holding the title to your house as joint tenants, for example, would avoid having your home pass through probate, but it's unlikely you want to share title with an 8-year-old.
ARTICLES BY DATE
MOBILE
November 5, 2012
Obama for president     Four years ago, President Barack Obama took office as the economy was in steep decline with millions in the process of losing their jobs, the nation was locked in seemingly endless military conflicts, Wall Street firms were getting bailed out but not held accountable and a growing number of Americans were unable to afford health insurance. Today, the economy is growing, albeit modestly, the U.S. military has largely withdrawn from Iraq and will do so in Afghanistan, Osama bin Laden is dead, the federal government has begun more closely regulating the kind of large banks and finance companies that contributed to the mortgage crisis and health care reform is gradually making sure working Americans can get affordable insurance for themselves and their families -- including those with pre-existing conditions.
Advertisement
NEWS
October 21, 1998
Jon Postel, 55, the Internet pioneer who wielded enormous influence managing technical details of the global computer network, died Friday night in Los Angeles while recovering from surgery to replace a leaking heart valve, said Vint Cerf, a senior vice president for MCI Worldcom Inc., who worked closely with him.Mr. Postel's death comes at a critical juncture for the Internet, with the federal government in the midst of largely turning over management of the worldwide network to a nonprofit group that he helped organize.
NEWS
October 22, 2012
The general public has never been especially fond of lawyers or judges. When Gallup polls Americans asking what professions they view favorably and which they view negatively, the lawyers get a thumbs down every time — although, on the bright side, the federal government and the oil industry are rated considerably worse. Nevertheless, as the old saying goes, you can hate lawyers until you need one. That's when they become invaluable in allowing a family to adopt a child or prevent an innocent person from being convicted of a crime or in upholding terms of a business contract.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Sun Staff Writer | October 14, 1994
The six candidates for three seats on the Howard County Orphan's Court are spending much of this election explaining to voters what the court does -- rather than why they should be elected.A modern-day misnomer, the orphan's court meets once a week to review probate cases, resolve disputed estates and appoint guardians for juveniles who receive property in wills. Its name originally stems from a 16th century English court.But the candidates say many voters ask them if the court is part of the county Department of Social Services or whether its judges handle custody cases and adoptions.
MOBILE
November 5, 2012
Obama for president     Four years ago, President Barack Obama took office as the economy was in steep decline with millions in the process of losing their jobs, the nation was locked in seemingly endless military conflicts, Wall Street firms were getting bailed out but not held accountable and a growing number of Americans were unable to afford health insurance. Today, the economy is growing, albeit modestly, the U.S. military has largely withdrawn from Iraq and will do so in Afghanistan, Osama bin Laden is dead, the federal government has begun more closely regulating the kind of large banks and finance companies that contributed to the mortgage crisis and health care reform is gradually making sure working Americans can get affordable insurance for themselves and their families -- including those with pre-existing conditions.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and John A. Morris and Sheridan Lyons and John A. Morris,Sun Staff Writers | July 17, 1994
Due to an editing error, A. Gordon Boone was incorrectly identified as an attorney in an article on Orphans' Court races in ++ Sunday's editions.+ The Sun regrets the errors.The state's lowliest court has record numbers of candidates this year in Anne Arundel and Baltimore counties, all vying for a part-time judgeships that don't require a law degree -- or much else.In each county, they're running for one of three seats on the Orphans' Court -- the oldest in Maryland and possibly in the nation -- a job that critics see as a political plum that should have withered long ago.In Baltimore County, the field of 21 includes two incumbents, along with lawyers, courthouse clerks, party activists, a parole officer, a bus driver, business people, and an unemployed car salesman.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 4, 2000
The couple who abandoned their severely disabled son at a Delaware hospital in December have agreed to a year's probation instead of a trial in Delaware, and to limit contact with their son to supervised visits. Richard and Dawn Kelso of Exton, Pa., a Philadelphia suburb, had been charged with child abandonment and conspiracy. The Kelsos dropped off their 10-year-old son, Steven, in his wheelchair at the Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children in Wilmington, Del., on Dec. 26 and left. Their actions drew national attention from parents and advocates for children with disabilities, and the Kelsos later told state prosecutors they had been facing a reduction in the visiting nursing care in January and did not know what else to do. Thursday, the couple apologized in a statement issued by their Wilmington lawyers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Vozzella | June 23, 2011
A guy by the name of Mike Schaefer has filed a claim stating that he should get $28,000 from William Donald Schaefer’s estate. Mike Schaefer, a Baltimore landlord, is no relation to the late mayor, governor and comptroller, though he openly wished voters would confuse him with the political original when he ran for U.S. Senate in 2006, Baltimore mayor in 2007 and city sheriff last year. Mike Schaefer pursued a similar strategy in Nevada, where he ran against state Sen. Ray Shaffer in 2004.
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,SUN STAFF | October 10, 1997
Ravens running back Bam Morris, whose career already has been damaged by drug charges in Texas and two subsequent suspensions by the NFL, is expected to appear before a district court judge today in Rockwall, Texas, where he hopes to prevent his 10-year probation from being revoked.Rockwall County authorities issued an arrest warrant yesterday for Morris, who skipped the team's practice in Owings Mills and was en route to Texas. Rockwall District Attorney Ray Sumrow said Morris' probation should be revoked because he violated two conditions of his probation by using alcohol and by failing to report to his probation officer seven times between July 1996 and August 1997.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Vozzella | June 23, 2011
A guy by the name of Mike Schaefer has filed a claim stating that he should get $28,000 from William Donald Schaefer’s estate. Mike Schaefer, a Baltimore landlord, is no relation to the late mayor, governor and comptroller, though he openly wished voters would confuse him with the political original when he ran for U.S. Senate in 2006, Baltimore mayor in 2007 and city sheriff last year. Mike Schaefer pursued a similar strategy in Nevada, where he ran against state Sen. Ray Shaffer in 2004.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2010
Stacie L. Price, the former PTA president at Johnnycake Elementary School, was given a suspended three-year prison term Monday after being convicted of stealing more than $9,000 from the organization. Price was also fined $500 and ordered to pay court costs, and must serve three years of unsupervised probation. Prosecutor Michael S. Fuller had asked the judge to send the 39-year-old defendant to jail, saying she had violated a position of trust by writing checks to herself from the PTA's bank account over six months and stopped only "because she got caught.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 4, 2000
The couple who abandoned their severely disabled son at a Delaware hospital in December have agreed to a year's probation instead of a trial in Delaware, and to limit contact with their son to supervised visits. Richard and Dawn Kelso of Exton, Pa., a Philadelphia suburb, had been charged with child abandonment and conspiracy. The Kelsos dropped off their 10-year-old son, Steven, in his wheelchair at the Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children in Wilmington, Del., on Dec. 26 and left. Their actions drew national attention from parents and advocates for children with disabilities, and the Kelsos later told state prosecutors they had been facing a reduction in the visiting nursing care in January and did not know what else to do. Thursday, the couple apologized in a statement issued by their Wilmington lawyers.
BUSINESS
By Liz Pulliam and Liz Pulliam,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 16, 2000
I am married with two children, and I am concerned what would happen to our estate if my wife and I both died in an accident. Do we really need a living trust to avoid going to probate court before our minor children can inherit any assets? Probably yes. Probably, because chances are you wouldn't want to use the more common ways to avoid probate, since minor children are involved. Holding the title to your house as joint tenants, for example, would avoid having your home pass through probate, but it's unlikely you want to share title with an 8-year-old.
NEWS
October 21, 1998
Jon Postel, 55, the Internet pioneer who wielded enormous influence managing technical details of the global computer network, died Friday night in Los Angeles while recovering from surgery to replace a leaking heart valve, said Vint Cerf, a senior vice president for MCI Worldcom Inc., who worked closely with him.Mr. Postel's death comes at a critical juncture for the Internet, with the federal government in the midst of largely turning over management of the worldwide network to a nonprofit group that he helped organize.
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,SUN STAFF | October 10, 1997
Ravens running back Bam Morris, whose career already has been damaged by drug charges in Texas and two subsequent suspensions by the NFL, is expected to appear before a district court judge today in Rockwall, Texas, where he hopes to prevent his 10-year probation from being revoked.Rockwall County authorities issued an arrest warrant yesterday for Morris, who skipped the team's practice in Owings Mills and was en route to Texas. Rockwall District Attorney Ray Sumrow said Morris' probation should be revoked because he violated two conditions of his probation by using alcohol and by failing to report to his probation officer seven times between July 1996 and August 1997.
NEWS
October 22, 2012
The general public has never been especially fond of lawyers or judges. When Gallup polls Americans asking what professions they view favorably and which they view negatively, the lawyers get a thumbs down every time — although, on the bright side, the federal government and the oil industry are rated considerably worse. Nevertheless, as the old saying goes, you can hate lawyers until you need one. That's when they become invaluable in allowing a family to adopt a child or prevent an innocent person from being convicted of a crime or in upholding terms of a business contract.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2010
Stacie L. Price, the former PTA president at Johnnycake Elementary School, was given a suspended three-year prison term Monday after being convicted of stealing more than $9,000 from the organization. Price was also fined $500 and ordered to pay court costs, and must serve three years of unsupervised probation. Prosecutor Michael S. Fuller had asked the judge to send the 39-year-old defendant to jail, saying she had violated a position of trust by writing checks to herself from the PTA's bank account over six months and stopped only "because she got caught.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Sun Staff Writer | October 14, 1994
The six candidates for three seats on the Howard County Orphan's Court are spending much of this election explaining to voters what the court does -- rather than why they should be elected.A modern-day misnomer, the orphan's court meets once a week to review probate cases, resolve disputed estates and appoint guardians for juveniles who receive property in wills. Its name originally stems from a 16th century English court.But the candidates say many voters ask them if the court is part of the county Department of Social Services or whether its judges handle custody cases and adoptions.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and John A. Morris and Sheridan Lyons and John A. Morris,Sun Staff Writers | July 17, 1994
Due to an editing error, A. Gordon Boone was incorrectly identified as an attorney in an article on Orphans' Court races in ++ Sunday's editions.+ The Sun regrets the errors.The state's lowliest court has record numbers of candidates this year in Anne Arundel and Baltimore counties, all vying for a part-time judgeships that don't require a law degree -- or much else.In each county, they're running for one of three seats on the Orphans' Court -- the oldest in Maryland and possibly in the nation -- a job that critics see as a political plum that should have withered long ago.In Baltimore County, the field of 21 includes two incumbents, along with lawyers, courthouse clerks, party activists, a parole officer, a bus driver, business people, and an unemployed car salesman.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.