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NEWS
April 1, 2014
We write as eyewitnesses to the agony of the Colts' departure in 1984 ( "Colts fans will never forget the day their beloved team left Baltimore, 30 years ago," March 28). Today's Ravens fan should never take for granted committed local ownership coupled with steady, capable management. By contrast, the Baltimore Colts franchise was an utter shambles by 1984. Former governor and Baltimore City Mayor William Donald Schaefer was, at best, a casual sports fan. Far more than most, however, he grasped the tangible and intangible benefits that professional sports franchises brought to Baltimore and to Maryland.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 1, 2014
We write as eyewitnesses to the agony of the Colts' departure in 1984 ( "Colts fans will never forget the day their beloved team left Baltimore, 30 years ago," March 28). Today's Ravens fan should never take for granted committed local ownership coupled with steady, capable management. By contrast, the Baltimore Colts franchise was an utter shambles by 1984. Former governor and Baltimore City Mayor William Donald Schaefer was, at best, a casual sports fan. Far more than most, however, he grasped the tangible and intangible benefits that professional sports franchises brought to Baltimore and to Maryland.
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SPORTS
By David Selig and The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2013
The Orioles have been getting quite a bit of national pub these days. They've been rising up everybody's power rankings , and this fella who plays third base seems to be a topic of conversation wherever you turn (even after losses like today's). Well, the Oriole Bird is getting his share of the love, too. Forbes revealed its 10 most popular mascots in pro sports on Tuesday, and our furry friend who patrols the aisles at Camden Yards is among them . As they explain, the mascots were chosen on the following crieteria: "Awareness, likeability, attention-getting, photo-friendliness, interaction and fun. " Fans were also asked if a given mascot happened to be his “absolute favorite” or “one of my favorites.” The Orioles' success on the field seemed to also be a factor in The Bird being chosen.
SPORTS
By David Selig and The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2013
The Orioles have been getting quite a bit of national pub these days. They've been rising up everybody's power rankings , and this fella who plays third base seems to be a topic of conversation wherever you turn (even after losses like today's). Well, the Oriole Bird is getting his share of the love, too. Forbes revealed its 10 most popular mascots in pro sports on Tuesday, and our furry friend who patrols the aisles at Camden Yards is among them . As they explain, the mascots were chosen on the following crieteria: "Awareness, likeability, attention-getting, photo-friendliness, interaction and fun. " Fans were also asked if a given mascot happened to be his “absolute favorite” or “one of my favorites.” The Orioles' success on the field seemed to also be a factor in The Bird being chosen.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | January 30, 1999
DARN IT! THE SUPER Bowl is on me once again, before I had a chance to book my flight back to southern Sudan, where there's little chance I'd hear one word about the National Football League's annual orgy of self-indulgence.So the weekend is here now, which leaves me with a choice of watching the premier game of NFL honchos -- the poster boys for greed -- or simply ignoring it as I've done the last three years.There's a strong argument for ignoring this year's Stupor Bowl. There's even a name for the argument: PSINet Stadium.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | February 8, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Congress seems to have power under the Constitution to enact the new baseball legislation President Clinton is recommending, but a potential court fight could make it harder to carry out in full, specialists in labor and constitutional law said yesterday.Any court challenge, by either the owners or the players, to a binding arbitration law emerging from Congress would be shaped by how the lawmakers write the bill and how they seek to justify it, one labor lawyer here said. Its potential impact on other pro leagues may have to be weighed, too.That lawyer, who refused to be identified, said the lawmakers would have to be able to explain why the baseball industry has been singled out, and why a process forced on the parties had to be substituted for normal collective bargaining.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | July 31, 1998
BASEketball, a new comedy starring Matt Stone and Trey Parker, creators of the hilariously subversive TV series "South Park," has its moments -- particularly when it skewers the buffoonish world of professional sports -- but spends too much time trying to be outrageous, not enough trying to be funny.Stone and Parker (who are better on-screen than anyone had a right to expect) play Doug Remer and Joe Cooper, boyhood friends who have dreamt of being sports icons since the day Cooper caught Reggie Jackson's third home run in the final game of the 1977 World Series.
SPORTS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 18, 2001
WASHINGTON - The U.S. Supreme Court, appearing reluctant to referee the rules of pro sports, reacted skeptically yesterday to a plea that it order the PGA Tour to let disabled golfer Casey Martin use a cart during its tournaments. Most of the justices seemed willing to treat a golf tournament as an activity covered by the federal law that bars discrimination against the disabled but not to use that law to force significant changes in the way golf is played professionally. At issue in the case the justices heard yesterday is the PGA Tour's long-followed "walking" rule: No golfer at one of its tournaments is allowed to use a cart to get around the course.
NEWS
By Gary Dorsey and Gary Dorsey,SUN STAFF | January 7, 2001
NASHVILLE, Tenn. - They had a playoff party at the Kroger grocery store here Thursday. You didn't hear a foul word. You didn't feel the tension of football fans frothing for a Sunday afternoon bird kill. You didn't sense that familiar desire to watch the home team kick someone's sorry rump, whip them six ways to Sunday and drop their quarterback's stinking carcass off the dock for crab feed. No. They were just having fun with their Tennessee Titans. Would they say an unkind word about Baltimore?
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | February 10, 2004
In Sunday's Daytona 500, Nextel Cup teams will begin racing under NASCAR's new points system that essentially sets up a regular season and a postseason. It is a system that is being met with a wait-and-see attitude by some, and one that is causing some teams to rethink their strategies. But at least one driver has no problem with the change that is bringing stock car racing more in line with other pro sports. "Until now, we've been the only major form of team sports without a postseason or playoff," Jeff Burton said.
NEWS
April 30, 2013
NBA center Jason Collins says he has gotten "incredible" support since revealing in Sports Illustrated that he is gay and thus becoming the first openly gay male athlete in one of the major team sports in this country. As that support includes congratulations from a current and former president and some of the biggest stars in his sport, perhaps that's even an understatement. What Mr. Collins has done is significant, of course, and he deserves all the good will and public support he can get. Pro basketball, baseball, football and hockey seem to be the last bastions of the "don't ask, don't tell" approach to the sexuality of their employees, if not outright hostility toward gays.
SPORTS
February 19, 2013
Cuban plays hard Ben Bolch Los Angeles Times The NBA still has the best owner in pro sports even after the passing of Jerry Buss. His name is Mark Cuban. Not only do his teams win (with the notable exception of this season), but he pampers his players, speaks his mind and always is looking for ways to improve and innovate. Besides, what other owner has appeared on "Entourage" and "The Colbert Report" and starred in his own reality show, "Shark Tank"? Cuban is a man of the people despite his extreme wealth.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | September 16, 2011
It would be hard for Orioles fans to not notice that the nearby seats at Camden Yards have become more and more vacant over the past decade. But according to a study from 247wallstreet.com, it might be worse than you think. Michael B. Sauter crunched attendance numbers for each team in the four major American professional sports leagues, and the Orioles are high on a list of a dozen teams that have lost the most fans since 2001. Using attendance records provided by ESPN, Sauter determined that attendance at Camden Yards has dropped 44 percent in the past decade . Only the Cleveland Indians (56.1)
NEWS
September 7, 2011
Most people are aware that college football and basketball players are a major part of the professional farm system for those sports. To allow athletes to participate on a college team without being enrolled full-time academically would create multiple unforeseen problems, in my opinion. I realize there are some semi-pro football teams, but I think it would be better to develop a farm system to enable high school graduates who cannot qualify academically or simply want to enhance their athletic abilities by participating in a professional program that would hone their skills and provide a modest income.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | February 21, 2011
Kobe Bryant scored 37 points as the West beat the East, 148-143, in Sunday's NBA All-Star game. He beat out LeBron James, who piled up a triple-double in a losing effort, for MVP honors. Those statlines tell you everything you need to know about the effort in the defensive end, but hey, that's how these All-Star games go. And that's why I had more fun watching Justin Bieber go head-to-head with MTV "Rock 'N' Jock" alum Michael Rapaport in Friday's celebrity game . That game was much more entertaining than the real one, though that's not saying very much.
SPORTS
By DAVID STEELE and DAVID STEELE,david.steele@baltsun.com | September 29, 2008
It's one of life's funny coincidences that Matt Millen finally got fired by the Detroit Lions the same week Ozzie Newsome's Ravens got ready to take a 2-0 record into Pittsburgh to face the Steelers. (And the same week Jerry Reese's defending Super Bowl champion New York Giants took their bye at 3-0. But that's getting ahead of the story.) Millen, of course, made a strong case for being the most criticized and vilified team executive in NFL history, if not in all of pro sports - and he deserved every syllable of it. Newsome never had heat on him the way Millen did (you know, because he won a Super Bowl)
SPORTS
November 18, 2005
They said it "It's satisfying to get a sack, but it's not as satisfying as getting the next one." Tamba Hali Penn State defensive end Good morning --Chicago Bears --Sure, they'd like to add punch to their offense, but not this way. Question of the day Does Congress still need to get involved in drug testing of pro sports? Sorry. I couldn't find where this is any of their business, and I've read the Constitution. We can stop worrying about government encroachment, because they politicized everything already.
NEWS
September 29, 2004
CHALK ONE up for an old saw that's oft ignored in pro sports, but still very true: "There's no I in team." The Anaheim Angels baseball club is in the final week of a heated pennant race. Before last night's games, they were just one game behind the Oakland A's with six games left. It's crunch time. So what do the Angels do? They suspend one of their key players, left fielder Jose Guillen, for the rest of the season - possible playoff games included. The much-traveled Guillen was hitting .294 with 27 home runs and 104 RBI. But he also has erupted in a string of emotional outbursts - the last, very public one being after Angels manager Mike Scioscia took him out of their Saturday game for a pinch runner.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE and BILL ORDINE,SUN REPORTER | October 30, 2007
Blow the whistle or swallow it. Call 'em close or let 'em play. Charge or block. No matter what NBA referees do, as a new pro basketball season begins, the suspicions and the jeers will be as inevitable as a LeBron James Nike commercial. The Tim Donaghy scandal still hangs over the NBA. The disgraced ref, who has admitted to providing information to gambling associates during the two most recent seasons, has yet to be sentenced. And more details about the corruption might come to light as the federal government pursues more prosecutions.
SPORTS
By DAVID STEELE | September 27, 2007
COLLEGE PARK -- Paul Nisenson was one of the 20 or so students who waited in line last night to talk some more to Sonny Vaccaro. Vaccaro spent a lifetime, made a nice living and a far-less-nice reputation talking to young men Nisenson's age, on the cusp of adulthood, eager for riches and immersed in sports. For nearly all of those years, those kids were basketball players. Now, because he has something else to sell besides shoes, Vaccaro's audience is students such as Nisenson, a freshman from New Jersey, and some 200 of his classmates at the University of Maryland's Robert H. Smith School of Business.
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