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By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | February 16, 2000
Investors flush with cable television money and $40 million to spend over five years on women's soccer announced plans yesterday for a professional league that would begin play in April 2001. The group is fronted by John S. Hendricks -- founder, chairman and chief executive of Bethesda's Discovery Communications Inc. He said the league, called the Women's United Soccer Association (WUSA), will begin with teams in eight, possibly 10, American cities out of 15 being considered. "The funding's in place, and the players are there," said Hendricks.
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SPORTS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | January 25, 2000
Taylor Twellman, Maryland's leading men's soccer scorer last fall and a third-team All-American, has opted to play professionally in Germany, forgoing his final two seasons of eligibility at College Park. The university announced yesterday that Twellman, 20, has signed with 1860 Munich, one of two pro teams from that city in the Bundesliga, Germany's top professional league. 1860 Munich is the older of the two and has a strong local following; Bayern Munich is more widely known, though, and more successful internationally.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | August 4, 1999
WASHINGTON -- When Pat Williams thinks of Carolyn Peck, the coach and general manager of the WNBA's Orlando Miracle, all he can see is an upside.But for Williams, the senior executive vice president of the NBA's Orlando Magic, which operates the Miracle franchise, that upside isn't just about her basketball coaching ability."
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,SUN STAFF | May 25, 1999
Outdoor lacrosse will have a professional future in the new millennium.Major League Lacrosse, which will begin in eight cities with the promotional phrase of "Take it Outside," was unveiled yesterday at a news conference in New York and will begin play in summer 2000.It's the first attempt for a professional outdoor league in more than a decade since the American Lacrosse League, which featured the Baltimore Tribe, folded in the mid-1980s."My goal is to expand the sport of lacrosse," said league founder Jake Steinfeld, known nationally for "Body by Jake," his fitness television show.
SPORTS
By Jerry Bembry and Jerry Bembry,SUN STAFF | December 8, 1998
For Bethesda-based lawyer Bruce Stern, it was a vision that formed nearly 15 years ago when he was an undergraduate at UCLA -- forming a professional basketball league consisting of mostly young, just out of high school players."
SPORTS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | September 16, 1998
The Maryland Mania and UMBC officials tentatively agreed yesterday that the new pro soccer team will play its A-League home games next season at UMBC Stadium.A contract formalizing the one-year arrangement, with an option for more, is expected to be ready for signing next week. Financial terms were not disclosed.Although the Mania expects to open its initial season in May on the Catonsville college's synthetic turf, team and UMBC spokesmen expressed hope that a separate agreement can be reached on upgrading a new grass soccer field the school has just opened.
SPORTS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | August 24, 1998
Time will tell, but over the weekend the man who may prove to be American professional soccer's Moses left office.Alan I. Rothenberg's transition from eight years as U.S. Soccer Federation president to owner of the Major League Soccer franchise in San Jose, Calif., was compressed in most places to a sentence or two.He deserves better.Because Rothenberg, 59, used his maximum two terms to revitalize at the pro level a game that, when he became its leader in August 1990, was at its nadir in the United States, toying with bankruptcy, devoid of leadership and run by amateurs.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | February 2, 1998
They are used to being the object of curiosity, having played that role for most of their lives. They are used to being asked about their game, and how it differs from the hockey being played in leagues from boys to men.The 20 players on the 1998 U.S. Olympic women's hockey team wear pads on their shoulders, not chips. They don't apologize for rules that prohibit body-checking or for being more balletic and less bullying than their male counterparts."People may have their perceptions about how hockey should be played and how hockey players don't have any teeth," said Cammi Granato, a six-time member of the U.S. national team.
SPORTS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | September 9, 1997
The owner of the Carolina Dynamo, one of the most competitive teams in professional soccer's top minor league, will be in Columbia today, hoping to make a deal that would move his franchise to this area next season.Neil Macpherson, the A-League team's owner and member of the league's executive committee, confirmed the talks. From Greensboro, N.C., yesterday, he said he wants to find in Maryland "a financial partner to share the load."The league, he said, already has approved the franchise move.
SPORTS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | August 15, 1997
Cinderella's alive and kicking.The new order of American professional soccer is helping breathe fresh life into this country's oldest continuous soccer competition, the U.S. Open Cup.With clear definition among four levels of play -- three professional and the other amateur -- for the first time, upsets in this knockout tournament are easier to fathom, if not explain away.And upsets there have been in quest of a refurbished Dewar Cup, until recently a misplaced, tarnished silver trophy that in every way symbolizes this 84-year-old tournament.
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