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NEWS
By Donald G. Vitek | September 15, 1991
Barry Egolf of Sykesville is the captain of one of the Baltimore Professional Duckpin Association League teams from Greenway Bowl East inBaltimore.The pro league was formed in 1961 to gather the top 60male bowlers in the Baltimore area.Later it was joined by the women's division. Now, the women's league has 12 teams of bowlers.The members of the league are draftedonto teams, similar to the drafts of professional sports. It is the only bowling league of its kind in the country.The league is a non-profit organization that makes annual monetary and time donations to charities.
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BUSINESS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2012
When Ravens safety Bernard Pollard got to the NFL, he noticed the veterans playing a card game in their downtime. And then he saw the sums of money being wagered. "I've seen people dropping $70,000 or $80,000," he said Monday after practice. Pollard hopes Bourre, an app released Friday that he conceived and paid for, will introduce fans to the game without their having to risk any real cash. Available for download on Apple products — iPhone, iPad and iPod Touch — for $1.99, Bourre represents the culmination of a long-ago dream hatched during hours spent playing video games with a teammate in Texas.
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SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | April 6, 1996
Cheers from thousands of American fans. Playing against other U.S. players in their home country. Television cameras capturing every shot.It has been a dream for many U.S. soccer players. And it becomes a reality tonight at 8.That's when D.C. United plays at the San Jose Clash in the inaugural game of Major League Soccer, which will be carried live by ESPN.This represents the first attempt to start a major outdoor pro league since the North American Soccer League folded 11 years ago."It's been a long time coming," said John Harkes, the D.C. United and U.S. national team midfielder.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,melissa.harris@baltsun.com | July 25, 2009
The nation's major professional sports leagues and the NCAA sued Friday to stop Delaware from launching single-game betting - and any wagering on sports other than football - before the NFL season starts this fall. If a federal judge grants the leagues' demands, Delaware's "sports lottery" would be limited, hampering efforts to balance the state's budget. A victory for the leagues also would curb, if slightly, an effort among Mid- Atlantic states to expand gambling, which is viewed as a politically safer revenue source than tax increases.
SPORTS
By Bill Free | February 8, 1991
Eight teams are committed to play and an 18-game schedule has been drawn up for the 1991 American Professional Soccer League season.But, said Maryland Bays coach Pete Caringi, there still is a slim chance the APSL might fold this weekend when the league owners meet in Miami."
SPORTS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | August 24, 1998
Time will tell, but over the weekend the man who may prove to be American professional soccer's Moses left office.Alan I. Rothenberg's transition from eight years as U.S. Soccer Federation president to owner of the Major League Soccer franchise in San Jose, Calif., was compressed in most places to a sentence or two.He deserves better.Because Rothenberg, 59, used his maximum two terms to revitalize at the pro level a game that, when he became its leader in August 1990, was at its nadir in the United States, toying with bankruptcy, devoid of leadership and run by amateurs.
SPORTS
By Bill Free and Bill Free,Staff Writer | November 17, 1993
The season opener for the Baltimore Bays has been delayed six days because of a scheduling conflict involving the Connecticut Wolves.The Bays were supposed to open their indoor United States Interregional Soccer League season Saturday on the road against the Wolves, but Connecticut discovered it had no arena to play the game in."There were two things scheduled for the same time," said Bays coach Kevin Healey. "And the Wolves found out they didn't have the facility to use for the game against us."
SPORTS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | September 16, 1998
The Maryland Mania and UMBC officials tentatively agreed yesterday that the new pro soccer team will play its A-League home games next season at UMBC Stadium.A contract formalizing the one-year arrangement, with an option for more, is expected to be ready for signing next week. Financial terms were not disclosed.Although the Mania expects to open its initial season in May on the Catonsville college's synthetic turf, team and UMBC spokesmen expressed hope that a separate agreement can be reached on upgrading a new grass soccer field the school has just opened.
SPORTS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | February 16, 2000
Investors flush with cable television money and $40 million to spend over five years on women's soccer announced plans yesterday for a professional league that would begin play in April 2001. The group is fronted by John S. Hendricks -- founder, chairman and chief executive of Bethesda's Discovery Communications Inc. He said the league, called the Women's United Soccer Association (WUSA), will begin with teams in eight, possibly 10, American cities out of 15 being considered. "The funding's in place, and the players are there," said Hendricks.
NEWS
By Donald G. Vitek | February 10, 1991
OK, ladies, you've been bowling duckpins for a long time, and you'reready to join the pro bowlers. How do you get started?Kathy Williams of Bel Air can give you some tips. She's president of the Women's Baltimore Professional Duckpin Association -- that's the new name for the old Ladies Professional Duckpin league. A different name but the same high standards of duckpin bowling.Kathy carries a 133 average. (Her husband, Charlie, a Baltimore County firefighter, carries 137; Kathy's two children, Julie and Jeffrey Gruzensky, are both duckpin bowlers.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,Sun reporter | August 4, 2007
The chance to reclaim past glory sent more than 300 college graduates to Orlando, Fla., and another 200 to Birmingham, Ala., during July to audition for the fledgling All American Football League. Whether it represented an exercise in wishful thinking or legitimate opportunity is unclear. Two years in the making, the league's inaugural season is scheduled for the spring of 2008. Whether the AAFL makes it that far is the question. For former college players J.P. Humber, a reserve running back at Maryland, and Davon Telp, a standout cornerback at Towson, opportunity is what led them to a two-day invitational tryout at the Citrus Bowl in Orlando.
SPORTS
By PAUL MCMULLEN and PAUL MCMULLEN,SUN REPORTER | July 31, 2006
Baltimore's best young basketball prospects travel the country during the summer, on the Amateur Athletic Union scene. "Midnight Madness" has returned to three city recreation centers, but the under-21 age limit doesn't provide a stage for the city's elite, as that format once did at the fabled Dome at Madison Square. Without a summer league certified by the NCAA, where do college players and the occasional pro find a game in Baltimore? From today through Thursday, there should be some fine runs at Loyola College, during the final weekly session of the camp operated there by NBA guard Juan Dixon and Loyola coach Jimmy Patsos.
NEWS
By JEFF SEIDEL and JEFF SEIDEL,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 12, 2006
Bryan Jelcic has long wanted to become a part of the Professional Bowlers Association tour. The 28-year-old Glen Burnie resident began bowling at age 7 and continues trying to work his way up the sport's ladder. Pro bowlers make their money and earn a living through a variety of tournaments around the country. But there are also several local and regional competitions in various states, including Maryland. Jelcic competes in those events regularly, especially the Free State Classic Tenpin Tour, which includes many Anne Arundel County tournaments.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | November 6, 2004
When Wally Backman was hired earlier this week as manager of the Arizona Diamondbacks, team officials knew of his background on the field but were apparently unaware that Backman had been arrested twice over the past five years, one a fourth-degree assault charge in 2001 and the other involving a charge of driving under the influence in 2000. It was not until those incidents, as well as some of Backman's financial problems, were revealed in a story in The New York Times, that Backman's past caught up with him. "I've made a few mistakes in my life, and I think everybody has," Backman told the Associated Press on Tuesday.
NEWS
By LOWELL E. SUNDERLAND | October 12, 2003
A LITTLE bit about several things being talked about, or that should be noted, in Howard County's amateur sports community: SOCCER: So what if it's Sweden vs. Germany for the 2003 Women's World Cup championship and not the United States national team? Watch the game today on ABC-TV, 1 p.m. The sport is what matters most of all, as can be attested to by all those thousands of girls and grown women who play it almost year-round in Howard County. The American women - role models for all those female players and a lot of boys and men, too - lost honorably (3-0 officially, but 1-0 when it mattered)
SPORTS
By Philip Hersh and Philip Hersh,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | September 16, 2003
CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. - Five days before the start of the event that was to provide a needed boost to the 3-year-old women's professional soccer league, its board of governors announced yesterday that a lack of funding had forced the league to suspend operations. John Hendricks, founder of the Women's United Soccer Association and its board chairman, said he hoped the suspension would provide enough time "to allow a miracle to happen." But chances the league will revive appear minimal. "It's definitely a sad day for women's sports," said Julie Foudy, co-captain of the U.S. women's national team and a WUSA governor.
SPORTS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | September 9, 1997
The owner of the Carolina Dynamo, one of the most competitive teams in professional soccer's top minor league, will be in Columbia today, hoping to make a deal that would move his franchise to this area next season.Neil Macpherson, the A-League team's owner and member of the league's executive committee, confirmed the talks. From Greensboro, N.C., yesterday, he said he wants to find in Maryland "a financial partner to share the load."The league, he said, already has approved the franchise move.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | July 6, 1994
Even as soccer's profile in the United States rises to a point far higher than any previous pinnacle, the sport is confronting a riddle here.Even as the United States' soccer wonks -- our sporting version of the Flat Earth Society -- celebrate the fact that an estimated 32 million of their countrymen watched the Brazil game and a handful of young American players proved they were major-leaguers throughout the World Cup, their sport is in something of...
SPORTS
By James Giza and James Giza,SUN STAFF | July 29, 2000
As 40 of the world's best lacrosse players prepare to take the UMBC Stadium field tonight at 8, a warning must be issued. Purists, beware. This is not your father's lacrosse. Tonight's game is the third of the Major League Lacrosse Summer Showcase, a seven-game series intended to promote what will be the first outdoor professional lacrosse league when MLL's eight teams begin play in June 2001. "We're anxious to see what kind of crowd we're going to get, what kind of response," said former Syracuse star Casey Powell, as he sat in the ESPN Zone downtown on Thursday, signing autographs with two other attackmen: his younger brother, Ryan, who led the Orangemen to the NCAA title this year, and Mark Millon, a former Massachusetts All-American and World Team MVP. "We just want to go out there and give the fans around here a good show."
SPORTS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | April 11, 2000
Washington was named yesterday as one of eight cities -- six on the East Coast -- to get teams in the first American women's professional soccer league, which hopes to begin play next April. John Hendricks, chairman of Bethesda's Discovery Communications Inc., will have half-interest in two teams -- Washington and San Francisco -- in the Women's United Soccer Association he has helped organize, bankroll and promote since last summer's Women's World Cup. The "single-entity" league owns all teams but has investors underwriting each franchise.
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