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NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | December 13, 2003
GREENCASTLE, Pa. - It was a letter that Whitney Donahue never expected to get. "I have never seen anybody so brave," began fifth-grader Daniel Poffenburger. "You should get all the prize money for saving so many lives." Donahue, a paunchy refrigerator repairman who drives a white van with a union bumper sticker on the back, may not look the part of a superhero. But to the pupils at his daughter's school, he is the man who helped make soccer and trick-or-treating safe again. On Oct. 24, 2002, Donahue spotted the faded Chevrolet Caprice belonging to sniper suspects John Allen Muhammad and Lee Boyd Malvo at a Frederick County rest stop and called police.
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NEWS
By Robin Mather Jenkins and Robin Mather Jenkins,Chicago Tribune | March 21, 2007
It might be the most honeyed phrase a home cook can hear: "This [your recipe here] tastes like a million bucks!" If it won the Pillsbury Bake-Off, it would taste like a million bucks, because that's the grand prize. Just ask a prize-winning cook like Josie A.G. Shapiro of Chicago what she has won: "a honeymoon in France!" Or ask seasoned contest cook Gloria Bradley of Naperville, Ill., what pleased her most: "Impress the kids by appearing in the National Enquirer!" And there's still more!
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Scott Shane and Michael Stroh and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | October 12, 2003
A few hours after he won a Nobel Prize Thursday, Dr. Peter Agre stepped up to a microphone at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and made a startling announcement to the audience of journalists and well-wishers: "I didn't do this work." Agre said he didn't deserve all the credit for his path-breaking discovery of aquaporins, proteins that regulate the flow of water in all living cells. The real work, he stressed, was done by the young researchers in his laboratory who put in long hours each day. "I made the coffee and sharpened the pencils," he said.
FEATURES
By Sarah Pekkanen and Sarah Pekkanen,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 27, 2000
It never happens this way on the commercials. Sometimes people answer the door in curlers or a bathrobe; sometimes they look perfectly put together. Sometimes they let loose with an ear-splitting shriek, and sometimes they cry. But they're always home. "Hello! Hellllllo!" shouts the woman knocking on the door of a home in a quiet Columbia cul-de-sac. "It's the Prize Patrol!" Yes, that Prize Patrol. From Publishers Clearing House, the magazine-sales company. They've come to Columbia in a shiny red van filled with roses, champagne, balloons and a big cardboard check (not as big as you might think, but we'll get to that in a moment)
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | September 24, 2002
When the New York Stock Exchange opens today, it will be with the blessing of Anne Arundel County Superintendent Eric J. Smith, who is scheduled to be in town to receive a prestigious national award for educators that includes a $25,000 cash prize. Smith and two other winners, selected by one of the nation's largest publishers of educational materials for their contributions in the field of education, will ring the bell that marks the start of the trading day. "I guess that's good news or bad news, depending on how well the market does tomorrow," Smith said yesterday before he left for the Big Apple, where he will receive the Harold W. McGraw Jr. Prize in Education at a ceremony in the New York Public Library.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | May 19, 2003
CHESTERTOWN - When Laura Maylene Walter left the 221st commencement here at Washington College yesterday, she was holding a lot more than sheepskin. Oh, the 22-year-old from Lancaster, Pa., won plenty of accolades, along with 228 other graduates. For one thing, she picked up summa cum laude honors from an English department stacked with talented, ambitious young writers and scholars. But 30 minutes after the ceremony, it was Walter who was surrounded by a pack of reporters, photographers and beaming college officials as she clutched an unopened envelope.
NEWS
By Diane Scharper and Diane Scharper,Special to the Sun | August 5, 2007
Out Stealing Horses By Per Petterson Translated by Anne Born Graywolf Press / 258 pages / $22 Betrayal: It's a theme found in everything from Genesis to Greek tragedy to Shakespeare's tragic (and comic) plays to the great classic works of such writers as Gustav Flaubert, Leo Tolstoy, Charles Dickens and Henrik Ibsen. Usually that theme is played out when friend betrays friend, spouse betrays spouse or child betrays parent. But what happens when a father betrays his son? That's the question informing Per Petterson's extraordinary novel, Out Stealing Horses.
NEWS
October 28, 2007
VIVIAN APLIN-BROWNLEE, 61 Washington Post editor Former Washington Post editor Vivian Aplin-Brownlee, who raised an early alarm concerning a Pulitzer Prize-winning story about an 8-year-old heroin addict who was made up, died Oct. 20 at age 61. Ms. Aplin-Brownlee died of complications from leukemia at her home in Washington, her husband, Dennis Brownlee, said Friday. The story, "Jimmy's World," won the Pulitzer Prize for feature writing in 1981 for Janet Cooke, but Ms. Aplin-Brownlee doubted the story from the start.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2012
How many millions? That would be 500 (up from 476 earlier today) of them if you win this week's eye-popping Mega Millions prize. It's hard to get one's head around, no? In Baltimore, that's enough money to help the city buy, say, a few historic landmarks, a couple of rec centers and -- why not -- free swimming all summer at every municipal pool. After a dip, everyone could then towel off with a ten. This morning people are going crazy over the news that they have a chance to win what would be the largest Mega Millions pot in history.
NEWS
By Marie V. Forbes | March 27, 1991
Mud. Thick, gooey, slimy mud. Mud that turned the shoreline of PineyRun Lake into a quagmire. Mud that sucked your boots in right up to the ankles.That's how many participants will remember Saturday's ninth annual Early Bird Fishing Tournament.Rain. A nasty, driving downpour that made anyone without proper rainwear a candidate for pneumonia.But then that's the sort of weather anglers have come to expect from this annual event. Last year, it snowed.Cold. When Roland Brown checked in with his prize-winning trout, his fingers were so numb he hardly could get the fish out ofthe creel.
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