Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPrivilege
IN THE NEWS

Privilege

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Marc A. Sorel | May 7, 2010
In 1948, the widows of three engineers killed in the crash of a U.S. Air Force B-29 Superfortress plane sued the government for damages. Rather than compensate the women, the United States invoked the state secrets privilege. At the time a little-known rule, the privilege allowed the Air Force to keep accident reports out of court for reasons of national security. In 1953, the Supreme Court in U.S. v. Reynolds agreed with the Air Force's decision. Thirty years later, however, when the records were declassified, they revealed no secrets — just evidence that the B-29 was poorly maintained.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2014
If a hotly debated Federal Hill beer garden were to open in time for Oktoberfest, it would have to do so without the beer. By a 2-1 vote Thursday, Baltimore's liquor board declared invalid a liquor license for Crossbar Der Biergarten, saying it expired in 2009 and the owners would not get a "hardship extension. " "The sale of liquor is a privilege, not a right," said board chairman Thomas Ward, who called past extensions of the proposed bar's license "illegal" decisions that the current board had a "duty to correct.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Tony Snow | June 4, 1998
WASHINGTON -- We live in the age of proliferation -- not of nukes, but of presidential privileges.In its determined crusade to hornswoggle independent counsel Kenneth Starr, the Clinton White House has manufactured many previously unknown privileges and put inventive new twists on old ones.They have argued, for instance, that executive privilege applies not only to the president, but also to employees who might talk to him. While the courts have hinted that first ladies can hide from scrutiny under the auspices of privilege, nobody seems inclined to agree that a conversation with President Clinton obliges participants to observe priestly silence.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | September 13, 2014
After reading Chris Davis' apologetic statement on his suspension from the Orioles for taking a drug he wasn't allowed to take under the rules of Major League Baseball, I had to look up the word "mistake. " A "mistake" is what Davis said he made. His manager, an Orioles broadcaster and a teammate used the word as well. "I made a mistake by taking Adderall," Davis said. "We all make mistakes," said Buck Showalter. "The big boy made a mistake," said Joe Angel, one of the voices of the Orioles on radio.
NEWS
July 25, 2012
If all the conditions for children of illegal immigrants to receive in-state college tuition rates are met - including graduating from a Maryland high school, having parents who pay their taxes and three years of residency in the state - then there is no reason such students should pay more for their college education. It's only when these conditions are not met that we end up penalizing out-of-state and foreign students, and overburden the taxpayers who support the state's two- and four-year colleges.
NEWS
August 21, 2014
I could not agree more with your editorial regarding the minor privilege tax ( "Minor privilege, major disincentive," Aug. 13). While the article was business focused, this absurd tax also hits the residential property owners in the city. A couple of months after purchasing a home in Baltimore City in 2012, I received a bill for a minor privilege tax. Being new to the city, I had no idea what this tax was. After a couple of phone calls I found out that I will be charged a $193.25 yearly fee for having a second floor bay window on my house and for a 5-inch piece of conduit that runs under the sidewalk in front of my house.
NEWS
November 5, 2013
My wife will be retiring in a few months, so we are currently going through the usual discussions about what is financially and emotionally best for us at this stage of our lives. As background, we're lifelong Maryland residents who are politically conservative and live in Anne Arundel County. So, in addition to the general annoyance of living in a deep blue state, we watched as our county was eviscerated by the current administration during the last redistricting. Needless to say, Thomas F. Schaller's "move away" columns caught our attention and sparked our interest ( "Don't secede; vote with your feet," Oct. 29)
NEWS
By RICHARD REEVES | January 27, 1993
Albuquerque, New Mexico.--At 6:35 a.m. last Wednesday, a Bernalillo County deputy sheriff named Mark Samrock stopped a car on a highway near here and began writing a ticket charging the driver with speeding, 45 miles per hour in a 35-mph zone. The driver, Virgil Rhodes, stepped out and asked the deputy if he knew who he was talking to. Deputy Samrock said he did not.''Well,'' Mr. Rhodes said, ''you're going to find out about it in a goddamned hurry.''Mr. Rhodes, it turned out, is a state senator, and in the course of verbally beating up on Deputy Samrock, quoted (correctly)
NEWS
By Clarence Page | July 12, 2005
WASHINGTON - Attention, fellow journalists: Special prosecutor Patrick Fitzgerald has blown our cover. In his argument for why New York Times reporter Judith Miller should be jailed until she tells a grand jury who revealed the name of a CIA operative to her, Mr. Fitzgerald stated that "journalists are not entitled to promise complete confidentiality. No one in America is." He's right. But what's really troubling is how the right of reporters to keep sources confidential has eroded in recent years.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger and The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2014
The project manager who oversaw the development of Baltimore's food truck policy is expected to lead a review of charging fees for items set outside homes and businesses, under a contact the city's spending panel is asked to approve Wednesday. The Board of Estimates will decide whether to approve a $73,300 one-year contract for Babila Lima, who is the mayor's cousin, to work under the director of the Department of General Services. The city's ethics policy doesn't recognize the relationship between an elected official and their cousin in its nepotism rules.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger and The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2014
The project manager who oversaw the development of Baltimore's food truck policy is expected to lead a review of charging fees for items set outside homes and businesses, under a contact the city's spending panel is asked to approve Wednesday. The Board of Estimates will decide whether to approve a $73,300 one-year contract for Babila Lima, who is the mayor's cousin, to work under the director of the Department of General Services. The city's ethics policy doesn't recognize the relationship between an elected official and their cousin in its nepotism rules.
NEWS
August 21, 2014
I could not agree more with your editorial regarding the minor privilege tax ( "Minor privilege, major disincentive," Aug. 13). While the article was business focused, this absurd tax also hits the residential property owners in the city. A couple of months after purchasing a home in Baltimore City in 2012, I received a bill for a minor privilege tax. Being new to the city, I had no idea what this tax was. After a couple of phone calls I found out that I will be charged a $193.25 yearly fee for having a second floor bay window on my house and for a 5-inch piece of conduit that runs under the sidewalk in front of my house.
NEWS
August 13, 2014
"Charge 'em for the lice, extra for the mice Two percent for looking in the mirror twice Here a little slice, there a little cut Three percent for sleeping with the window shut... " - "Master of the House," Les Miserables A business owner in Baltimore could be excused for feeling like he's living permanently in Monsieur Thénardier's inn from Les Miserables. On top of the highest income and property tax rates in the state, business owners here must contend with the Byzantine set of fees for what are known as "minor privileges" - everything from a table and chairs on the sidewalk outside a cafe to, rather famously, a papier mache flamingo suspended 20 feet above the ground.
SPORTS
By Glenn Graham, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2014
McDonogh standout defenseman Alex Hurdle started thinking about playing in the Under Armour All-America Lacrosse Classic when he was 10 years old, glued to the television set. Now, it's his turn. The All-Metro first-team selection graduated from McDonogh this spring and is looking forward to playing with and against the country's top players. The Classic, in its ninth year, is set for Saturday at Towson University's Johnny Unitas Stadium. Signed to play at Notre Dame next season, Hurdle had a memorable senior year.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | February 16, 2014
When I wrote recently about the multi-lingual Coca-Cola commercial , expressing satisfaction that the influence of white racists appears to be on the wane,* reactions were predictable. A representative specimen from the comment by Blackberry82: " John, you may revel in your smug liberalism now, but your grandchildren and great-grandchildren won't share your amusement when they become the victims of race hatred when they are part of the minority white population in the future USA. They won't understand how you could take such joy in seeing the decline of your own kind and encouraging the onset of their future plight.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | December 31, 2013
Thousands of immigrants living here without legal permission will start the new year demonstrating skills in parallel parking and two-point turns in hopes of becoming licensed drivers in Maryland. Maryland joins a handful of states on Jan. 1 that issue so-called "second-tier" licenses that allow immigrants who do not have full legal documentation to drive on Maryland roads, register cars and obtain insurance. The licenses will not suffice as federal identification. Nearly 13,000 immigrants have signed up to take driving tests in the coming weeks, according to state officials.
SPORTS
By David Steele | December 30, 2004
A"PRIVILEGE." That's what Jets quarterback Chad Pennington said the media enjoy when covering pro athletes. But that's old news, overtaken by events since then. The sports world, the one Pennington is grasping to understand beyond his own place in it, lost Johnny Oates and Reggie White in the past week. If Pennington really understood how much of a privilege it was to be around those two men during their too-short stays on Earth, he'd never use the word in that context again, no matter what point he was trying to make or gaffe he was trying to play off. Not to speak for everybody covering sports in America these days, but it's safe to say Pennington's crack a week and a half ago - that it's a privilege, not a right, to be around the best athletes in the world - gave a number of us in this business pause to reflect.
NEWS
By William Lobdell and Jean Guccione and William Lobdell and Jean Guccione,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 14, 2004
LOS ANGELES - Enmeshed in a battle to maintain the secrecy of church documents involving priests accused of molesting children, Los Angeles Cardinal Roger M. Mahony has adopted a legal strategy more aggressive than that of any other bishop in the country, according to scholars and attorneys. At the center of the fight are thousands of pages from priest personnel files that Mahony has succeeded for more than a year and a half in keeping from prosecutors, lawyers for victims and the public.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | November 12, 2013
It was obvious from any cool-headed assessment, even his own, that Ed Reed's time in Houston wasn't headed for a happy ending. That said, I was still startled for a second when I heard the Texans planned to release him after just seven games. It's simply not the expected ending for an athlete as inspired as Reed was only a few seasons ago. And Houston had put on such a push to woo him last summer.     But the NFL is a cold league, probably the least sentimental in American sports.
NEWS
November 5, 2013
My wife will be retiring in a few months, so we are currently going through the usual discussions about what is financially and emotionally best for us at this stage of our lives. As background, we're lifelong Maryland residents who are politically conservative and live in Anne Arundel County. So, in addition to the general annoyance of living in a deep blue state, we watched as our county was eviscerated by the current administration during the last redistricting. Needless to say, Thomas F. Schaller's "move away" columns caught our attention and sparked our interest ( "Don't secede; vote with your feet," Oct. 29)
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.