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December 6, 2011
Editor: The Harford county Board of Education's opposition to any public money for non-public schools, while regrettable, is understandable. The board sees no responsibility for the education of Harford County children not in their corporate system; the board's business is preserving its monopoly on education tax dollars for their corporation; however, your editorial of Dec. 2 is a chilling, exclusionary and discriminatory statement not shared by all Marylanders. Many Maryland voters support school choice reforms and policies so parents aren't economically denied freedom of school choice.
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NEWS
June 10, 2014
The Baltimore County Board of Education needs to restore sibling priority for kindergarten admission to magnet elementary schools. While the intentions of revoking sibling priority may have been good, the impact on Baltimore County families and on the school system itself will be overwhelmingly negative. The previous Baltimore County Public Schools superintendent revoked sibling priority for kindergarten applications to elementary magnet schools in order to make access to magnet schools more equitable for all families.
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NEWS
February 5, 2011
I was happy to see the "school choice" article in today's Baltimore Sun ( "National movement for 'school choice' embraced in city," Feb. 3). Baltimore schools CEO Andrés Alonso and many of the charter schools in our city should be applauded for what they are doing and have accomplished. Certainly, more choice rather than less choice is beneficial to Baltimore City children and families looking for the best education that they can obtain. People interested in the topic of school choice should keep in mind that full and true "school choice" must allow parents to consider sending their children to non-public schools in our city as well as public schools.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2014
Looking at the Magothy River backdrop abutting Eagle Cove School in Pasadena, it isn't hard to imagine that teachers at the private prekindergarten-through-fifth grade school must have a difficult time teaching the meaning of the word "final. " Everything from the running water and the changes of seasons to the budding plants and growing animal life speaks of a continuum - a contrast to the fact that this past year marked the final days of the school's history. Eagle Cove School, which was founded along the Magothy near Gibson Island in 1956, is closing, a casualty of declining enrollment and dwindling funds.
NEWS
April 2, 2010
In the Readers Respond section of The Sun on April 1, Barbara Samuels makes a case against the BOAST tax credit for Maryland private schools. Ms. Samuels assumes that parents who send their children to private schools are "affluent" and welcomes a shift back into public schools. This ignores the many private schools that serve a different population. Schools such as Friendship School in Eldersburg provide a private nonpublic education for 51 children in grades 1 to 8 who have severe language-based learning differences such as dyslexia.
NEWS
Erica L. Green | April 2, 2013
The ACLU of Maryland is calling for legislators to halt funding to religious and private schools, saying that taxpayer money should be put toward the state's funding obligation to public schools. In a release, the advocacy organization called a taxpayer subsidy of $500,000 slated to go to private schools next year "unfair. " The funding, included in the state's supplementary budget, was scheduled to be reviewed in the House Appropriations Committee on Tuesday.  “Taxpayer funding should not be used for textbooks and technology at private and religious schools, especially when the state's fiscal climate that is just beginning to recover,” Sara Love, public policy director for the ACLU of Maryland, said in a statement.  The organization went on to say: "Our public funds should be dedicated to public schools.
NEWS
September 1, 1992
1/8 TC The sagging economy, which has produced its share of disputes over budget cuts and teacher pay in public schools, has been felt in the non-public schools as well.There was concern that economic problems could reduce enrollment, but as schools open, the expectation is that enrollment will be stable in both Catholic and independent schools in the Baltimore area. While some families may have stayed away from private schools this year because of the cost, school officials say others have turned to private schools because they are concerned about program and staff cuts in the public schools.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | January 26, 1999
Hundreds of private school pupils, parents and teachers gathered at the State House last night to continue a 3-year-old quest to get state aid for Roman Catholic, Jewish and other nonpublic schools.The schools are seeking $14 million to pay for expenses such as textbooks and technology improvements.Last night, children held up signs saying, "It's about time!" and "We want our fair share," but the lobbying effort might fail this year.Gov. Parris N. Glendening did not fund the request in his proposed budget unveiled last week, and a spokeswoman says he does not plan to include such funding in a supplemental budget.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2014
A social studies teacher at Broadneck High School was named Anne Arundel County Public Schools Teacher of the Year for 2013-14 at the county's annual Excellence in Education Awards banquet Thursday night. Christina Houstian, Broadneck's second teacher to win the award in the last seven years and its sixth since the program's inception in 1986-87, will be Anne Arundel's nominee for Maryland Teacher of the Year in the fall. Erin Kolarik, a math and science teacher at St. Martin's Lutheran School in Annapolis, was named independent schools teacher of the year.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2014
A Maryland school superintendent wouldn't ordinarily give local systems a pass on the requirement that public school students go to school for 180 days a year. But these have not been ordinary times. The seemingly endless winter, with its unusual number of snow days, has raised the specter of students going to school into the last week of June. On Tuesday, the State Board of Education offered a way out. As light snow fell outside their meeting room, board members voted to give Superintendent Lillian Lowery the authority to waive up to five days of school this year for public schools and two days for private schools.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, Liz Bowie and Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2014
- Newly named to head Baltimore's public schools, Gregory E. Thornton has unfinished business in the district he is leaving behind after 31/2 tumultuous years. Wearing a red T-shirt, he arrived Friday at a school where, to peals of laughter, the 59-year-old would join kids in a "jump rope-a-thon. " But, as so frequently happened during his tenure, there were political hoops to jump through first. "How are we doing?" Thornton asked a state senator he spied in the welcoming crowd.
NEWS
February 3, 2014
I read with great interest Samuel Totten's commentary on Congress and the National rifle Association ( "Congress capitulates to the NRA," Jan. 28). While I agree with everything he wrote I still don't understand why our elected officials have to experience a tragedy first-and in order to have some empathy and do something to stem the flow of gun violence. Fortunately neither I nor anyone in my family has witnessed or been involved in a senseless act of gun violence. But that doesn't mean I can't relate to these horrific events.
SPORTS
By Jeff Seidel, For The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2014
LANDOVER - It was another sweep for the McDonogh boys and girls in the private school indoor track championship on Friday as the top-ranked girls and No. 2 boys combined to win their respective championships for a second consecutive year. For the girls, it was their sixth-straight Interscholastic Athletic Association of Maryland title. The boys won a second consecutive Maryland Interscholastic Athletic Association crown. The team used two wins from Lakin Hatcher (55, 300) and Sidney Hayes (500, long jump)
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2013
When a representative from Cristo Rey Jesuit High School visited Danielle Cook's class, the eighth-grader thought she fit the criteria for the rigorous college preparatory high school in Baltimore. She has been a straight-A student since preschool, is at the top of her class at Afya Public Charter School and participates in a half-dozen extracurricular activities. Then the representative described the school's dress code and its hairstyle restrictions, and Danielle realized something other than academics could keep her from attending: the 75 dreadlocks framing her face.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | November 22, 2013
Roland Park Country School has received permission from the Baltimore City Public Schools to open a public charter school for middle school girls in 2015. Roland Park Country, a girls school, is believed to be the first private school in the nation to win approval for a public charter school, although several schools in Hawaii are trying, Roland Park Country School spokeswoman Nancy Mugele said. The charter school, to be named for Lillie May Carroll Jackson, a civil rights pioneer and early leader of the NAACP in Baltimore, is scheduled to open in fall 2015.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2013
The stepfather of Maryland basketball recruit Trayvon Reed said Tuesday that his son's move from the Atlanta suburbs to a Christian-based private school in New Jersey was based largely on getting the 7-1 center into the kind of academic environment that would allow him to be eligible to play as a freshman in 2014-15. Reed, who is considered one of the top high school centers in the country and is rated as high as No. 6 at his position nationally, enrolled Monday at the Life Center Academy in Burlington, N.J. Daniel Moore said his son had initially planned to go to a school in Indiana, but the family learned last week that the school didn't have room for him. “I was a little late getting that together," Moore said.
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