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EXPLORE
August 1, 2011
I was dismayed by our county executive's comments regarding the proposed Clarksville Commons project . A few observations are foremost in the mind of this citizen and longtime resident of this area. The Kendalls have been a part of our community longer than our young county executive has been alive. This family hardware business has been the linchpin of Clarksville. The loyalty of their customers is evidenced by the fact that their small, World War II-era-quonset-hut-based store survived a competitive battle with another operator who opened a short distance away in a much larger newer building.
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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2014
Baltimore City Councilman Robert W. Curran is tired of hearing about motorists whose cars were towed for reasons he finds ridiculous - for being parked outside the white lines in a supermarket lot, for instance, or at a fast food restaurant when the business was closed. So he's sponsoring legislation to spell out a narrow list of conditions for which a vehicle can be removed from private property. And he would cut the allowed towing fee by nearly half. "What they're doing is such a disincentive for people to come here and visit Baltimore," Curran said.
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NEWS
April 8, 2014
Eminent domain is one of those governmental attributes that has a fair amount in common with taxes. Both are inherent powers of any government, dating to the earliest days of government. Both can seem particularly onerous to the people who end up having to cede money or property to the government. And, like it or not, both are necessary to the functioning of government. Taxes are relatively easy to understand. If no one pays taxes, there is no government, which means everything from no national defense to no youth league athletic fields.
NEWS
April 8, 2014
Eminent domain is one of those governmental attributes that has a fair amount in common with taxes. Both are inherent powers of any government, dating to the earliest days of government. Both can seem particularly onerous to the people who end up having to cede money or property to the government. And, like it or not, both are necessary to the functioning of government. Taxes are relatively easy to understand. If no one pays taxes, there is no government, which means everything from no national defense to no youth league athletic fields.
BUSINESS
By KENNETH HARNEY | March 6, 2005
COULD YOUR local government seize the home you own solely to transfer it to somebody who promises to pay higher taxes? That might strike you as bizarre, improbable and illegal. After all, the Fifth Amendment to the Constitution prohibits takings of private property for public use without just compensation, right? Correct. But what is a "public" use, and who gets to define it? Could it involve, as the Supreme Court heard Feb. 22, a municipal government hypothetically seizing a privately owned Motel 6 and transferring the property to a privately owned Ritz-Carlton hotel development group, simply because the latter would generate higher tax revenues?
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 1, 2005
WASHINGTON - Angry over a recent Supreme Court decision, the House of Representatives began a legislative drive yesterday to roll back the power of local governments to seize homes and other private property for economic development projects. By a vote of 231-189, the House approved an amendment forbidding the Bush administration from spending money on projects that seize private property for business development. House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, a California Democrat, was among those who voted against the amendment, saying she opposes withholding federal dollars "for the enforcement of any decision of the Supreme Court, no matter how opposed I am to that decision."
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson | November 22, 2009
Tim Wist of Baltimore County writes: I cannot figure out why there is still a ban on Sunday hunting in just four of Maryland's 23 counties. With 19 counties now having two to five Sunday hunting days on private property, why not all counties? We are talking about private property. If a landowner wants to permit Sunday hunting, then it should be allowed all season. I hunt in Baltimore County and am limited to Saturdays. Can you possibly get an answer from the Department of Natural Resources?
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson | November 22, 2009
Tim Wist of Baltimore County writes: I cannot figure out why there is still a ban on Sunday hunting in just four of Maryland's 23 counties. With 19 counties now having two to five Sunday hunting days on private property, why not all counties? We are talking about private property. If a landowner wants to permit Sunday hunting, then it should be allowed all season. I hunt in Baltimore County and am limited to Saturdays. Can you possibly get an answer from the Department of Natural Resources?
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | June 24, 1998
Frustrated by the failure of Harford County Executive Eileen M. Rehrmann's gubernatorial campaign to remove two allegedly illegal signs, Baltimore County officials have slapped the campaign with $4,800 in fines for zoning violations.After the initial citation last month, campaign officials promised to remove the two adjoining 6-by-12-foot signs, mounted on hefty wooden posts and picturing Rehrmann, who is challenging Gov. Parris N. Glendening in September's Democratic primary.But the signs still stood yesterday on private property near Catonsville, despite a county ban on campaign signs so early in the election season.
NEWS
July 22, 2001
THE SHORELINE of Maryland may be public but first you have to get there. And sometimes, a conflict between public access rights and private property rights plays out across the waterfronts of America. Along the Patuxent River in Calvert County, there's a fishing cove where the issue has raised hard feelings. Tired of increasingly troublesome trespassers, the landowners of Leitches Wharf finally closed off the longtime path through their property to the nearby public beach. People who had been fishing there for decades took offense and the fence was cut down.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2011
Returning from a monthlong break, the Howard County Council will begin discussing new legislation on Tuesday, including a bid to restrict the county's authority to seize private property through eminent domain. A bill introduced by Greg Fox, a Fulton Republican, would change the county charter to limit the county's ability to take land for nonpublic uses. It is in response to a continuing battle over where to put an access road for a county-owned property that was slated to be a mixed-use development before the developer backed out in July.
EXPLORE
August 11, 2011
I was dismayed by our county executive's comments regarding the proposed Clarksville Commons project . A few observations are foremost in the mind of this citizen and longtime resident of this area. The Kendalls have been a part of our community longer than our young county executive has been alive. This family hardware business has been the linchpin of Clarksville. The loyalty of their customers is evidenced by the fact that their small, World War II-era-quonset-hut-based store survived a competitive battle with another operator who opened a short distance away in a much larger newer building.
NEWS
June 9, 2011
It is good to see that the ground rent owners in Maryland are finally having their day in court.( "Court to hear challenge to ground rent law," June 7) The ground rent system in Maryland was abused by a small number of investors as exposed by The Sun some years ago. However, the fact that many ground rents may now have been "extinguished" by state legislation, in my opinion, amounts to taking of private property without just compensation. Peculiar to Maryland and Louisiana, ground rents were inherited from English law. The terminology "rent" is misleading and cause for much misunderstanding.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2011
Judges on Maryland's highest court questioned Monday a new law that requires people owning ground rents to register or lose them, an attempt by lawmakers to end the antiquated property laws. Charles J. Muskin, whose grandfather's estate had about 300 ground rents, contends that losing ground rents for failing to register them amounts to an unconstitutional taking of private property. Muskin, an attorney arguing the case on his own behalf, registered between half and two-thirds of his ground rents during the three-year window allotted in the 2007 law, calling the process cumbersome.
NEWS
July 22, 2010
The article concerning the sale of a previously set aside sanctuary on the Eastern shore ("Shore wildlife sanctuary sold," Baltimoresun.com, July 16) is disturbing to me and should be to all Marylanders. Bob Pascal, who got very wealthy once he left office as county executive of Anne Arundel County, has purchased the 950 acre estate in Talbot County for $8.5 million. A steal for that amount of property with waterfront, even in today's market. The property once owned by the philanthropic du Pont family & donated to the National Audubon Society.
NEWS
April 25, 2010
The problem: Parking in Baltimore County alleys is not allowed, but there are no signs to warn drivers. The back story: Steve Tobias says he doesn't want to be rudely awakened anymore. He and other residents along Berkshire Road, off North Point Road in eastern Baltimore County, have received letters in the mail warning them that vehicles parked in the alleys behind their homes would be ticketed. But trash collection recently ceased in the alley behind his Berkshire Road home for as long as three weeks when garbage trucks could not enter because of vehicles blocking access.
NEWS
July 22, 2010
The article concerning the sale of a previously set aside sanctuary on the Eastern shore ("Shore wildlife sanctuary sold," Baltimoresun.com, July 16) is disturbing to me and should be to all Marylanders. Bob Pascal, who got very wealthy once he left office as county executive of Anne Arundel County, has purchased the 950 acre estate in Talbot County for $8.5 million. A steal for that amount of property with waterfront, even in today's market. The property once owned by the philanthropic du Pont family & donated to the National Audubon Society.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance | April 5, 2010
The discovery of 10 million-year-old whale bones poking out of an eroding cliff face in Calvert County seemed a windfall for science. That's certainly how Shmuel Rotenstreich saw it when the bones appeared almost two years ago below the cliff-top home he shares with his wife, Debora Linzer, in Chesapeake Ranch Estates. So when someone from the Calvert Marine Museum asked if he'd object if the museum's paleontologists excavated the skeleton, Rotenstreich, 63, a computer scientist at George Washington University, did not hesitate.
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