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By David Nitkin and Michael Dresser and David Nitkin and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | February 5, 2002
ALTHOUGH Gov. Parris N. Glendening and his staff have mastered the art of concealing important events in his life, word eventually spills out. When the governor and former wife Frances Hughes Glendening divorced in November, they were in and out of a Prince George's County courthouse without notice. Reporters were clueless that a court date had been scheduled. When he was remarried 11 days ago, to former aide Jennifer E. Crawford, a civil ceremony was held inside the governor's mansion three days before the news surfaced.
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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2014
Baltimore County State Del. Jon S. Cardin, who lost the primary campaign for attorney general, says he was the victim of the "most negative smear campaign in a Democratic Party primary in Maryland's modern history. "  In a Facebook post this week, Cardin, who runs his own law practice, also said he plans to return to private life, after losing last month to Montgomery County State Sen. Brian Frosh. Frosh, whom Cardin calls a "good Democrat" in the post, will face Republican lawyer Jeffrey Pritzker in the general election.  Cardin received criticism during the primary campaign over his misuse of Baltimore police resources during a stunt wedding proposal; missing nearly 75 percent of his committee votes during the 2014 General Assembly session; and touting the endorsement of a Baltimore rapper facing human trafficking charges.  Some of these charges were made in negative mailers funded by labor unions that supported Frosh.  In a Facebook post shortly after the primary, Cardin called the campaign "disgustingly negative.
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NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen | November 12, 1990
AS DEFEATED Baltimore County Executive Dennis F. Rasmussen reluctantly returns to private life, so can I.You see, I was the other Rasmussen in Baltimore County, the one who was always being asked, "Are you a relative of Dennis Rasmussen?" Or sometimes, "Are you his brother?"Beyond a total lack of physical resemblance, I don't wear monogrammed shirts and I drive a low-priced Ford product, not a Lincoln.However, our paths began to cross four years ago when Rasmussen ran for county executive.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | April 1, 2013
In this era of huge federal debt and fiscal dysfunction, it's less than heartening to learn from the Congressional Research Service that the nation's four living former chief executives got a total of $3.7 million in pensions and operating expenses last year from Uncle Sam, aka the American taxpayer. The largesse is provided under the terms of the Former Presidents Act, which Congress passed in 1958 to ease presidents back into private life and enable them to handle mail, travel and other obligations they carried with them into retirement.
NEWS
By Ryan Davis and Ryan Davis,SUN STAFF | May 21, 2004
HILLBURN, N.Y. - Baltimore Police Commissioner Kevin P. Clark had warned his family there would be controversy. After Clark took over as the city's top police officer last year, he began making major staffing changes to the department's leadership. That, his son says, is when Clark called and told him to be prepared. "He told me don't be surprised if I hear rumors. It's probably from someone who is not going to be happy with what he's doing," said Kevin Clark Jr. during an interview here yesterday.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2014
Baltimore County State Del. Jon S. Cardin, who lost the primary campaign for attorney general, says he was the victim of the "most negative smear campaign in a Democratic Party primary in Maryland's modern history. "  In a Facebook post this week, Cardin, who runs his own law practice, also said he plans to return to private life, after losing last month to Montgomery County State Sen. Brian Frosh. Frosh, whom Cardin calls a "good Democrat" in the post, will face Republican lawyer Jeffrey Pritzker in the general election.  Cardin received criticism during the primary campaign over his misuse of Baltimore police resources during a stunt wedding proposal; missing nearly 75 percent of his committee votes during the 2014 General Assembly session; and touting the endorsement of a Baltimore rapper facing human trafficking charges.  Some of these charges were made in negative mailers funded by labor unions that supported Frosh.  In a Facebook post shortly after the primary, Cardin called the campaign "disgustingly negative.
NEWS
January 29, 1992
The press has not been fair in reporting about the private life of Arkansas Gov. Bill Clinton, by a vote of 370 to 290 (56 percent vs. 43 percent) from 660 callers to SUNDIAL.Out of 662 responses, 432 (65 percent) say this is not an important topic for a presidential campaign, while 230 (34 percent) say otherwise.Among 659 callers, 403, or 61 percent, say they would vote for a candidate who is guilty of infidelity.
NEWS
October 25, 1991
Perhaps it was telling that Clarence Thomas, the Supreme Court nominee whose confirmation hearings bumped the afternoon soaps, ended up taking the oath of office unannounced to the public, behind closed doors.The private ceremony Wednesday was a marked contrast not only to the swearings-in of justices over the last five decades but, more important, to the persona of the man who first strode proudly into the Senate Judiciary hearing room last month amid lights and cameras, eager for public attention.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Staff Writer | February 15, 1993
When the new first lady announced she would be known as Hillary Rodham Clinton, recognizing the maiden name she had retained long into her law career and marriage, many brides-to-be reviewed their reasons for changing -- or retaining -- their surnames."
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | August 15, 1991
Washington-- In 1987, Gary Hart, whose adultery was incessant, flagrant and, until then, unreported, said that if journalists followed him around, they would be bored. Some did; they weren't.Now we are being dragged back into the unpleasant business of deciding what private behavior is relevant to the assessment of political, especially presidential, candidates. That question answers this one: What is legitimate for journalists to scrutinize and publicize?Most Americans haven't a clue who Bill Clinton is -- he is Arkansas' 44-year-old Democratic governor -- and he has only one chance to make a first impression on the national public.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2012
In an antic moment last week, The New Yorker  pitched an appeal to readers:  What word would you most like to eliminate from the English language?   Awesome  and  epic  won some votes because of overuse, phlegm  from disgustingness, but moist , which has recently taken on an evil odor, overwhelmed. In its wisdom, however, The New Yorker chose slacks  as a word worthy of extinction .  This game, as Stan Carey points out at Sentence First , always draws a lot of players . In fact, as you can see on the comments at Johnson 's post on the same subject , all you have to do is broach the subject, and people start trotting out their nominees, like so many would-be Torquemadas hustling the condemned to the stake.  The extremity of the responses speaks to how much we personalize the language.
EXPLORE
By Mike Giuliano | November 17, 2011
Movie stars cultivate their screen image so carefully that they endlessly worry whether some bit of tabloid gossip will point out a discrepancy between that image and what they're really like in private life. That's the sort of anxiety making a movie actor nervous in Douglas Carter Beane's "The Little Dog Laughed" at Fells Point Corner Theatre. Hypcritical stars, controlling agents and other trappings of tinseltown life have been satirically dealt with many times before, but this playwright makes a claim on your attention owing to his knack for writing clever dialogue that's delivered in a showbiz world where agents make pitches with fastball velocity.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | June 12, 2011
Let's roll out the list. It includes, in no particular order of sluttishness: Kwame Kilpatrick; Jesse Jackson; James McGreevey; Ted Haggard; Gary Condit; Mark Sanford; John Edwards; Bill Clinton; Newt Gingrich; Rudy Giuliani; Eliot Spitzer; Antonio Villaraigosa; Arnold Schwarzenegger; James West; Larry Craig; David Vitter; John Ensign. And now Anthony Weiner, Democratic representative fromNew York. The thing these individuals have in common is as obvious as, well ... the erect penis in Mr. Weiner's underwear in that risqué picture he claimed he never tweeted to a young woman and wasn't even sure was really him - only to confess last week that he was lying on both counts.
NEWS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,ken.murray@baltsun.com | April 9, 2009
Marvin Webster lived the good life at Morgan State University in the early 1970s. He was the "Human Eraser," a 7-foot-1 shot blocker who intimidated opponents on the basketball court and who charmed friends and teammates off it with his caring, selfless personality. Webster lived another life altogether, though, after he left Morgan for professional basketball in 1975. He quickly became one of the game's best big men and enjoyed a 10-year career. But there was tribulation during his career - dealing with hepatitis and liver disease - and after it, coping with the death of an ex-wife who was 39 and a son only 19. The final chapter of Webster's life was written last weekend in a Tulsa, Okla.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Julie Bykowicz and Annie Linskey and Julie Bykowicz,annie.linskey@baltsun.com and julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | January 11, 2009
A day after becoming the first Baltimore mayor to be indicted, Mayor Sheila Dixon maintained a public schedule designed to show her steely backbone and close connections with the community - donning boxing gloves at a gym in West Baltimore and later giving heartfelt advice to underprivileged girls at a Boys and Girls Club in Brooklyn. "If you make a mistake today, you can get up the next day and keep focused with what you need to do," Dixon, a Democrat, told the Brooklyn group. She could have been talking about herself.
NEWS
December 13, 2008
BETTIE PAGE, 85 Pinup girl helped set stage for sexual revolution Bettie Page, a legendary pinup girl whose photographs in the nude, in bondage and in naughty-but-nice poses appeared in men's magazines and private stashes across America in the 1950s and set the stage for the sexual revolution of the 1960s, died Thursday in Los Angeles. Ms. Page, whose popularity underwent a cult-like revival in the last 20 years, had been hospitalized for three weeks with pneumonia and was about to be released Dec. 2 when she suffered a heart attack and lapsed into a coma.
NEWS
March 13, 1992
THE REASON we have so much crime is that crime pays, putting the lie to a maxim millions of us learned at home and at church. "How can you teach a 14- or 15-year-old the value of staying in school when he sees $5,000 a week being made on the street [in drug sales]," a frustrated Baltimore middle school principal asked last weekend.According to the Dallas-based National Center for Policy Analysis:Only 17 percent of all murders culminate in a prison sentence.Only 5 percent of all rapes lead to a prison term.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | August 10, 2007
My Best Friend, like so many French farces, tries to conjure a laughing soul from a comedy machine. Happily, even when the machine breaks down, the soul remains. Patrice Leconte's wide-screen situation comedy about a self-centered art dealer, Francois Coiste (Daniel Autheil), who bets his business partner, Catherine (Julie Gayet), that he can produce a best buddy in 10 days, has an enveloping friendly spirit that fills the cracks when the plot breaks into smithereens. Even the setup contains irritating flaws: For example, Catherine sets the wager in motion because Francois has never asked about her private life - she jolts him when she introduces him to her attractive lesbian lover.
SPORTS
By Rick Maese and Kevin Van Valkenburg | August 21, 2008
The Sun's Olympic correspondents, Rick Maese and Kevin Van Valkenburg, are blogging to each other at baltimoresun.com/olympicsblog . An excerpt: Maese, et al., Subject: Private lives and private eyes Fame is a strange beast, my friend. The world of gossip journalism is freaking out right now, trying to figure out whether Michael Phelps has a girlfriend. He is, in some ways, the David Beckham of the sporting world at the moment. The British tabloids are basically making things up about his private life (big surprise there!
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | August 10, 2007
My Best Friend, like so many French farces, tries to conjure a laughing soul from a comedy machine. Happily, even when the machine breaks down, the soul remains. Patrice Leconte's wide-screen situation comedy about a self-centered art dealer, Francois Coiste (Daniel Autheil), who bets his business partner, Catherine (Julie Gayet), that he can produce a best buddy in 10 days, has an enveloping friendly spirit that fills the cracks when the plot breaks into smithereens. Even the setup contains irritating flaws: For example, Catherine sets the wager in motion because Francois has never asked about her private life - she jolts him when she introduces him to her attractive lesbian lover.
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