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NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | July 1, 2002
For partners Anthony Crofton and Philip Mastramico, the secrets of their trade are simple: Act normal, try not to stand out, and be sure to get a clear shot from your pager-camcorder when you catch a disabled workers' compensation claimant lifting weights at the gym. The private investigators, co-owners of Elkridge-based Tolle Investigative Services Inc., handle hundreds of insurance fraud cases a year, with a little common sense and a few cool toys...
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2012
Country music might have a history of making its women play by the rules. But Miranda Lambert has made a career of speaking her mind. Lambert's effortless ability to break your heart one moment (the Grammy-winning ballad "The House That Built Me") and find glee in revenge the next ("Kerosene," a song about Lambert burning down her cheating boyfriend's house, would make her hero Loretta Lynn proud) that makes her one of country music's most vital talents. "Four the Record," her latest album released in November, finds the 28-year-old newlywed (she married fellow country star Blake Shelton last May)
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NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | February 8, 2001
A federal judge has dismissed a discrimination lawsuit brought by a former Baltimore police officer who said she was denied a promotion in 1996 because she is a woman, not because she was under investigation for selling secret police information. In a ruling filed yesterday, U.S. District Judge Andre M. Davis rejected the claims by Catherine D. Miele, who retired in 1999 after 16 years on the city force. The lawsuit was the latest legal battle for Miele, who was indicted in 1997 on charges of bribery and misconduct.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann | January 18, 2012
The parents of Annie McCann, the young Virginia girl who disappeared from her suburban Washington home four years ago and was found dead in Baltimore, say there is a "significant new investigative lead" in the case. Mary Jane and Daniel McCann plan to discuss the information at a news conference on Thursday in Washington. In a statement, the long-grieving parents say they held a "promising meeting" with the new head of the Baltimore Police Department's homicide unit. Annie, who was 16, left her home in Alexandria, Va., in November 2008 and was found dead near a trash bin in the Perkins Homes public housing complex in Southeast Baltimore.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Staff Writer | August 16, 1992
The county police team that takes over the assets of drug dealers wants more than $122,000 to refurbish the police firing range it uses for training and to hire two private investigators to work with the state's attorney's office.The County Council has scheduled a public hearing on the supplemental budget request, funneled through County Executive Robert R. Neall, at 7:30 p.m. tomorrow in the Arundel Center.The firing range at the police academy in Davidsonville, where the Forfeiture and Asset Seizure Team trains, was slated for an overhaul in the capital budget, but the request was not approved, said County Budget Officer Steven E. Welkos.
NEWS
By Linda Chavez | March 10, 1998
YOU'D think the press would have learned a lesson or two over the past five years in its dealings with President Clinton's White House, but apparently not.Lesson one: Never believe any categorical denial of wrongdoing on first utterance, because it's likely to be revised with clarifications, qualifications or obfuscations within days, if not hours.Lesson two: Never underestimate the White House response team's ability to divert press attention from the truth of the accusations, and refocus it on the motives of those doing the accusing.
NEWS
By Steven A. Holmes and Steven A. Holmes,New York Times News Service | October 1, 1992
DALLAS -- Ross Perot, whose original candidacy for the presidency was dogged by allegations that he hired private detectives to investigate business competitors, hired a California private investigator to conduct investigations of some of the volunteers in his campaign.An official with the Perot campaign acknowledged yesterday that the Dallas billionaire paid more than $76,000 in August and September to the Callahan & Gibbons Group, a San Francisco company that does private investigations.
FEATURES
By Sheila Anne Feeney and Sheila Anne Feeney,New York Daily News | August 5, 1991
In the beginning, there was the skirt, Nancy Drew.Next, dames started saturating television like tears soaking a hanky. "Remington Steele," "Moonlighting" and "Murder, She Wrote" all boasted Bettys solving crimes the big boys couldn't -- or wouldn't -- touch.Now, the big screen has gone dizzy over doll detectives with "V.I. Warshawski," a movie about a glam-gammed gumshoe who springs to work for "a dollar and a just cause." Her job includes computer hacking, a high-speed boat chase, getting beat up and shot at, kidnapping and murder.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and David Nitkin and Del Quentin Wilber and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | January 6, 2004
A month before former Maryland State Police Superintendent Edward T. Norris was indicted by a federal grand jury, the governor's office hired a private investigation firm, spending more than $23,000 for background checks of potential replacements. The search was under way even as Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. expressed public support for Norris and denied that he was looking for possible replacements. A bill submitted to the state by the investigation firm, a copy of which was obtained by The Sun, shows that private detectives conducted an extensive review of candidates.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | August 29, 1998
For two steamy days in July, four private investigators armed with radios, tape-recorders and a video camera ran a round-the-clock stakeout at the Northwest Baltimore house that the state Senate majority leader called home.What did they find? Nothing. And that's what they were looking for."We're looking at this house," recalled Michael Widenhouse, president of Evergreen Security Inc., which conducted the investigation into Sen. Clarence W. Blount's residency, "and we're thinking, 'Yeah, the Senate majority leader lives on the second floor,' and you really don't expect anyone to show up. And they didn't."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 21, 2011
Paul Thomas Baker, a retired FBI special agent who later became a private investigator, died Jan. 1 of pneumonia at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. He was 85. Mr. Baker, the son of a letter carrier and a homemaker, was born in Baltimore and raised in Irvington. After graduating from Mount St. Joseph High School in 1943, he enlisted in the Navy, where he served in the Pacific as a pharmacist technician and later as personal secretary to Rear Adm. Charles M. Oman of the Navy Medical Corps.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2010
The white Volvo sedan that Annie McCann drove to flee her Virginia home and run away to Baltimore still sits in her parents' garage in Alexandria. Dan and Mary Jane McCann continue to make the $525 monthly payments, hoping that one day a police officer will once more comb through the vehicle and find clues to their daughter's sudden disappearance and death in Baltimore. The McCanns are convinced the police missed something in the investigation of their daughter's death and prematurely concluded that she took her own life by drinking Bactine, dying of an overdose from one of its strongest ingredients, lidocaine.
BUSINESS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | April 1, 2005
ATLANTA - An executive for troubled ChoicePoint says consumers will be able to review personal information compiled about them and then sold to employers, insurance companies and other businesses. Don McGuffey, the company's vice president for data acquisition, made the comment in testimony before a committee of the California state Senate on Wednesday. Currently, by paying the company, people can see reports that contain information about them. McGuffey said the new system would provide "a single point of access" to review a variety of reports with that information.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | September 3, 2004
Take Sam Spade, Starsky and Hutch, Charlie's Angels. But hold the fedora and trench coat, the crazy car chases, the high-heeled sprints after bad guys. What you've got left, city officials hope, is the answer to Baltimore's housing woes. In an unusual move, Baltimore's housing department has hired a handful of private investigators to track down owners of problem properties so they can be cited for code violations, taken to court, forced to fix up their houses or, in some cases, stripped of them.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and David Nitkin and Del Quentin Wilber and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | January 6, 2004
A month before former Maryland State Police Superintendent Edward T. Norris was indicted by a federal grand jury, the governor's office hired a private investigation firm, spending more than $23,000 for background checks of potential replacements. The search was under way even as Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. expressed public support for Norris and denied that he was looking for possible replacements. A bill submitted to the state by the investigation firm, a copy of which was obtained by The Sun, shows that private detectives conducted an extensive review of candidates.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 20, 2003
Foy R. Allen, a former private investigator who founded one of the largest uniformed security agencies in Maryland, died of complications from an infection Tuesday at Oak Crest Village in Parkville. He was 92 and formerly lived in Towson. Mr. Allen was born in Floydata, Texas, and was raised by relatives near Amarillo after the death of his parents in the Spanish influenza epidemic of 1919. He worked in an Amarillo hotel to earn enough money to pay his tuition at the private Rhodes School in New York City.
BUSINESS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | April 1, 2005
ATLANTA - An executive for troubled ChoicePoint says consumers will be able to review personal information compiled about them and then sold to employers, insurance companies and other businesses. Don McGuffey, the company's vice president for data acquisition, made the comment in testimony before a committee of the California state Senate on Wednesday. Currently, by paying the company, people can see reports that contain information about them. McGuffey said the new system would provide "a single point of access" to review a variety of reports with that information.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann | January 18, 2012
The parents of Annie McCann, the young Virginia girl who disappeared from her suburban Washington home four years ago and was found dead in Baltimore, say there is a "significant new investigative lead" in the case. Mary Jane and Daniel McCann plan to discuss the information at a news conference on Thursday in Washington. In a statement, the long-grieving parents say they held a "promising meeting" with the new head of the Baltimore Police Department's homicide unit. Annie, who was 16, left her home in Alexandria, Va., in November 2008 and was found dead near a trash bin in the Perkins Homes public housing complex in Southeast Baltimore.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | July 1, 2002
For partners Anthony Crofton and Philip Mastramico, the secrets of their trade are simple: Act normal, try not to stand out, and be sure to get a clear shot from your pager-camcorder when you catch a disabled workers' compensation claimant lifting weights at the gym. The private investigators, co-owners of Elkridge-based Tolle Investigative Services Inc., handle hundreds of insurance fraud cases a year, with a little common sense and a few cool toys...
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