Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPrivate Health Insurance
IN THE NEWS

Private Health Insurance

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE | February 10, 2008
College is expensive enough without having to pay for something you're already getting. Yet many parents are spending hundreds of dollars more than necessary each year on health care for their student. Most students are covered under a parent's insurance. That's good, because even young adults can be hit with a medical emergency. Problem is, campus health centers rarely accept that insurance. "So parents are paying for insurance they're not able to use for their son or daughter," says James A. Boyle, president of the advocacy group College Parents of America.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 3, 2014
It doesn't take a doctor to diagnose Fix-is-in Disease, the condition common to politicians who look out for favored individuals. In the recent outbreak in Annapolis, the warning signs are too painfully obvious for most anyone to ignore. Last week, the chairmen to the two committees with oversight of Maryland's woeful health care exchange announced they'll wait for state auditors to look into the matter this summer rather than proceeding with their own investigation during the current legislative session.
Advertisement
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 21, 1990
WASHINGTON -- In an effort to shift federal costs to private health insurers, the Bush administration is proposing new measures to compel Medicare beneficiaries to file claims with any private insurers before the government pays anything for services provided by doctors or hospitals.That is what they are supposed to do under current law, but in practice Medicare pays many claims that have already been paid by private insurers or should have been.Several million of the 30 million elderly people enrolled in Medicare are also employed and have private health insurance through their employers.
NEWS
September 24, 2013
Surely, even for Democrats there's remarkably little joy to be had in watching mainstream Republicans turn on Senators Mike Lee and Ted Cruz for forcing the GOP into a suicide mission. The big show in Washington - the final (at least one can hope) showdown over Obamacare - is in its last week (again, one hopes), and things are getting ugly. Not that the internal squabbles aren't amusing - watching the usual conservative pundits at outlets like the Wall Street Journal or Fox News bemoan the excesses of their tea party doctrinaire creations has quite the Frankenstein quality to it - but the ending is not likely to be tidy.
NEWS
By New York Times | December 21, 1990
WASHINGTON -- In an effort to shift federal costs to private health insurers, the Bush administration is proposing new measures to compel Medicare beneficiaries to file claims with any private insurers before the government pays anything for services provided by doctors or hospitals.That is what they are supposed to do under current law, but in practice Medicare pays many claims that have already been paid by private insurers or should have been.Several million of the 30 million elderly people enrolled in Medicare are also employed and have private health insurance through their employers.
NEWS
September 29, 2012
The op-ed by Drs. Joshua M. Sharfstein and Laura Herrera and Charles Milligan ("Caring about costs, too," Sept. 27) offers a compelling set of recommendations to improve the quality of health care while reducing costs. Unfortunately, they neglected to describe the best single evidence-based practice - eliminating private health insurance. Private health insurance adds only costs, but no value, to the delivery of health services. A Cambridge Medical Care Foundation study found that 31 percent of health care spending in the U.S. - equal to more than $600 billion annually - pays for administration, marketing, and the profits of private insurance.
NEWS
By Eli Ginzberg | November 13, 1992
THE Clinton administration will soon find out why health-care reform is so difficult.The reason is that for most people the health system is satisfactory.Although about one in seven has no insurance, most of the uninsured are children or young adults, who use physicians and hospitals rarely.Another one in seven, on Medicaid, is likely to receive less than optimal care, but deficiencies also characterize his or her housing, income, food and education.A further one in seven may face serious trouble when confronting catastrophic illness or injury because of shallow insurance coverage.
NEWS
July 17, 2012
James Burdick sanctimoniously dismisses the legitimate concerns of opponents of the Affordable Care Act and universal care as "dogmatic bluster" ("Universal care on the horizon," July 13). He then goes on to sugarcoat the rationing of health care, stating that "cutting overutilization is a major goal" and that "quality is precisely the clinically correct test or treatment chosen by the doctor and patient together - no more, no less. " That's what we already have under the current system.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | November 12, 1991
WASHINGTON -- An unusual coalition of major corporations, labor unions and consumer groups today was to announce a radical plan for health care reform, including mandatory medical contributions by businesses and a national health care budget with tough cost controls on payments to doctors and hospitals.Under the proposal, major segments of the big business community, where health insurance coverage is routine, are demanding for the first time that all companies -- large and small -- provide insurance to employees or else contribute to a public program.
EXPLORE
December 19, 2012
Did you know that experts predict our children will be the first generation to have a shorter life expectancy than their parents? You ask, why? Today, children drink more sugar-sweetened beverages than their parents, as children. Too much sugar in the diet, especially in liquid form, has been linked to development of high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke, diabetes and many more diseases. Sugar-sweetened beverages supply half of the added sugar in the diets of 12-17-year-olds and one-third of the added sugar in diets of 2-5-year-olds.
HEALTH
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2013
Like most 3-year-olds, Mariah Venable is a climber and a jumper. And sometimes she lands on her face instead of her legs. Her acrobatic attempts have cost her two baby teeth already - and have left her mother thankful she has good dental insurance. "You have to start on their teeth early so they don't have issues when they get older," said Cheryl Venable, who recently took her daughter - smiling wide through the gaps - to a city clinic that offers dental care to low-income and uninsured families.
EXPLORE
March 5, 2013
March is observed across the nation as Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month. Many survivors, patients, caregivers and others whose lives have been affected by colorectal cancer come together to generate awareness of the importance of getting screened and also encouraging loved ones to get screened. According to the American Cancer Society, excluding skin cancers, colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer diagnosed in men and women in the United States. In 2013, the American Cancer Society estimates 102,480 new cases of colon cancer and 40,340 new cases of rectal cancer will be reported.
EXPLORE
December 19, 2012
Did you know that experts predict our children will be the first generation to have a shorter life expectancy than their parents? You ask, why? Today, children drink more sugar-sweetened beverages than their parents, as children. Too much sugar in the diet, especially in liquid form, has been linked to development of high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke, diabetes and many more diseases. Sugar-sweetened beverages supply half of the added sugar in the diets of 12-17-year-olds and one-third of the added sugar in diets of 2-5-year-olds.
NEWS
September 29, 2012
The op-ed by Drs. Joshua M. Sharfstein and Laura Herrera and Charles Milligan ("Caring about costs, too," Sept. 27) offers a compelling set of recommendations to improve the quality of health care while reducing costs. Unfortunately, they neglected to describe the best single evidence-based practice - eliminating private health insurance. Private health insurance adds only costs, but no value, to the delivery of health services. A Cambridge Medical Care Foundation study found that 31 percent of health care spending in the U.S. - equal to more than $600 billion annually - pays for administration, marketing, and the profits of private insurance.
NEWS
July 17, 2012
James Burdick sanctimoniously dismisses the legitimate concerns of opponents of the Affordable Care Act and universal care as "dogmatic bluster" ("Universal care on the horizon," July 13). He then goes on to sugarcoat the rationing of health care, stating that "cutting overutilization is a major goal" and that "quality is precisely the clinically correct test or treatment chosen by the doctor and patient together - no more, no less. " That's what we already have under the current system.
NEWS
By Ken Ulman and Peter Beilenson | April 8, 2012
With a far more contentious hearing than expected before the Supreme Court, President Barack Obama's Affordable Care Act (ACA) could be struck down by a sharply divided court when it rules in June. If that happens, insurance will continue to be priced beyond the means of many. It is therefore prudent to look at possible alternatives for these Americans. Fortunately, a proven model exists today in Howard County: the Healthy Howard Health Plan. With some changes to its financing structure, it could emerge as a viable option for Americans who will not be able to afford to buy insurance should the ACA be struck down.
NEWS
November 6, 1992
Bell's RecordWhile reading John P. Greenspan's letter (Oct. 30) concerning Judge Robert Bell, I was struck by what seemed to be an obvious misstatement of Judge Bell's record.Although Mr. Greenspan did not identify the four-month period to which he had reference, I reviewed Court of Appeals cases for the period May, 1991, when Judge Bell joined the court, through August, 1992, and I could find no four-month period during which Judge Bell did not vote to affirm a conviction in an appropriate case.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | February 12, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- A House committee considered a bill yesterday that would practically ban the private health insurance industry from Maryland, put doctors on a strict annual budget and create a Canadian-style "universal" system.It was the first of three hearings in the House to examine the major health-care reform plans before the legislature this year. Most observers give those bills slim chance of becoming law this year, but supporters of the Canadian system think momentum for such a plan is building.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | March 31, 2012
Politicians and presidents of both parties have occasionally suffered from open-mic syndrome, saying something when they thought the microphone was turned off they wished had not been made public. The latest to fall prey to that amplification of the mouth is President Barack Obama. The president told Russian President Dmitry Medvedev during their Monday meeting in Seoul, South Korea, that once re-elected, he would have "more flexibility" to deal with missile defense. The president asked Mr. Medvedev to relay to incoming President Vladimir Putin his request for "patience" and "space.
NEWS
March 6, 2012
Rush Limbaugh is the reigning shock jock of conservative political punditry - insults, outrage and outsized bluster are his stock in trade - so it takes quite an uproar for him to apologize. But that's what he has done at least twice now, if unconvincingly, after calling 30-year-old Georgetown law student Sandra Fluke a "slut" and "prostitute" for testifying to a Congressional panel in favor of the Obama administration's birth control mandate. Last week's personal attack was outrageous, particularly given that Ms. Fluke's testimony was never about her desire to have "recreational sexual activities" as Mr. Limbaugh continued to describe the matter in his on-line apology.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.