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NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Staff Writer | November 24, 1992
Budget restraints have claimed Baltimore County's annual collection of bagged leaves: The trucks used for bulk trash pickups and fall leaf collections have been sold, and the sanitation department has 30 fewer workers.However, Charles K. Weiss, the county's sanitation chief, said private trash haulers will collect bagged leaves, and collections also will be conducted through pilot curbside recycling programs. Private haulers, who collect all the county's residential trash, also handle bulk trash pickups for a $10 fee.It is illegal for county residents to sweep their leaves into the streets.
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NEWS
May 14, 2009
Let dog owners howl in triumph: Baltimore is no longer the city where walking an unleashed poodle can earn the owner a $1,000 fine - at least not for a first offense. Irate pet lovers have successfully embarrassed the City Council into neutering what many saw as an excessive penalty. And make no mistake: It was too big a penalty. A tenfold increase of a fine - any fine, really - should have caught somebody's attention at City Hall before this. That's especially true for something as commonplace as a leash-law infraction.
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NEWS
By Eric Siegel | June 1, 1997
IN PHOENIX, ARIZ., widely regarded as one of the best-managed cities in the country, part of the city's garbage is picked up by municipal work crews, part by a private company. Ditto in Indianapolis, a recognized leader among cities in privatization, and in Charlotte, N.C.But in Baltimore, a force of 348 city workers picks up all the city's residential and part of its commercial garbage -- at an annual cost of $15.7 million, or about $67 for each of 233,000 households.Public Works Director George Balog says he likes it that way."
NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,Sun reporter | September 28, 2007
The city Health Department has been hit with numerous complaints from Mount Vernon residents who say they are being awakened as early as 4 a.m. by noisy trash trucks operated by a private firm. Angry residents of the historic district have made phone calls and sent e-mail demanding that the city crack down on the trash hauler, Waste Management Inc. City law calls for trash collection in residential areas to occur between 7 a.m. and 11 p.m. Trash collection can take place in business, commercial and industrial areas any time as long as the site is not within 100 feet of a residential structure.
NEWS
March 4, 1993
Half the members of the ad hoc Countywide Solid Waste Study Committee apparently believe that 43,000 Carroll County households should be paying a special "tax" of $1.4 million to subsidize the county's small trash haulers. That is the only conclusion one can draw from the committee's decision not to recommend changes in Carroll's trash collection system.That extra cost -- which can amount to as much as $96 a year for each household using a private hauler -- is the difference between the current collection system and the cost of the county contracting with private haulers.
NEWS
July 14, 1993
The above headline pretty much describes the deal made last week by Baltimore County Executive Roger Hayden and the County Council over the local custom of not putting trash-hauling contracts out to bid.For decades, executives have personally appointed haulers when rare openings occurred. No bid is put out, no formal contract is drawn up, no other government agency enters the process. A handshake with the executive is enough to seal the deal.We're not talking peanuts here, either. This year, some 50 private haulers will be awarded contracts totaling more than $15 million.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Sun Staff Writer | October 6, 1994
Town mayors are expected to push Carroll County commissioners today to make a decision to change the way trash is collected in the county.The commissioners have invited 30 people -- the county's eight mayors and 22 representatives from trash removal and recycling companies -- to a 2:30 p.m. meeting at the County Office Building to discuss the issue.Commissioner Donald I. Dell said yesterday that he doesn't expect the board to reach any conclusions today. Mr. Dell said he does not want to change the current system, in which residents contract with private haulers.
NEWS
By Bruce Reid and Bruce Reid,Evening Sun Staff | January 16, 1992
Harford County has become the final Maryland jurisdiction to approve a state-mandated plan for trash recycling.At the same time, county officials are asking private haulers to encourage residents to recycle by offering economic incentives."
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Sun Staff Writer | May 24, 1994
Carroll's commissioners said yesterday that they will not make a decision about whether to increase the fee for dumping in landfills until they meet with private haulers.Comptroller Eugene C. Curfman recommended that they increase the tipping fee by $9.05 per ton. The current fee is $40 per ton.The commissioners must increase the fee to comply with new government accounting standards that require the county to charge a fee high enough to pay for future landfill operating and capital costs.
NEWS
May 30, 1992
The buzz word in government these days, embraced by liberals and conservatives alike, is "privatization" -- meaning that the government hires businesses to provide services it used to deliver. When voluntary curbside recycling begins in Harford County on Monday, residents will get a measure of how responsive privatization can be.Harford is one of two Baltimore metropolitan jurisdictions where private haulers, not the government, collect residential trash. The county has required the sanitation firms to offer curbside recycling to its customers beginning next week because the county, like its neighbors, must recycle a fifth of its trash under a 1994 deadline set by the state.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | March 18, 1998
Trash haulers in Carroll County will pay an additional $2 for each ton of waste they dump at the county's Northern Landfill, beginning July 1.But Carroll residents will continue to get coupons for two free trips to the landfill a year.The County Commissioners yesterday raised the tipping fee to $47 per ton, which will generate an additional $215,000 a year.The actions were part of a review of the county's proposed solid waste budget for the next fiscal year.The commissioners retained a program that provides coupons, attached to county property tax bills.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | July 16, 1997
A private waste hauler delivered its first load of Carroll County trash to a waste-to-energy incinerator in York, Pa., yesterday.Waste Management of Maryland began transporting trash from the Northern Landfill in Reese under a five-year contract signed last week by the Board of County Commissioners. The service will cost the county about $3.4 million a year, officials said.Carroll residents should see no change in their trash costs or service from private haulers.The county will pay Waste Management $39.75 a ton to transport its trash.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel | June 1, 1997
IN PHOENIX, ARIZ., widely regarded as one of the best-managed cities in the country, part of the city's garbage is picked up by municipal work crews, part by a private company. Ditto in Indianapolis, a recognized leader among cities in privatization, and in Charlotte, N.C.But in Baltimore, a force of 348 city workers picks up all the city's residential and part of its commercial garbage -- at an annual cost of $15.7 million, or about $67 for each of 233,000 households.Public Works Director George Balog says he likes it that way."
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | October 31, 1995
Sykesville may cut back on its residential trash collection or quit the business altogether.The only Carroll County town that hauls its own trash is facing increased costs for a labor-intensive process, and town officials are reviewing their options."
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Sun Staff Writer | October 7, 1994
Are Carroll County residents unhappy with trash collection service? Do they think they pay too much to private haulers? Do they want government to step in to lower costs?At a meeting yesterday to discuss trash collection, town mayors and private haulers were invited to present their opposing views to the county commissioners. About 35 people attended.The commissioners had heard their arguments before. The county has been studying whether to change its collection system for the past few years.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Sun Staff Writer | October 6, 1994
Town mayors are expected to push Carroll County commissioners today to make a decision to change the way trash is collected in the county.The commissioners have invited 30 people -- the county's eight mayors and 22 representatives from trash removal and recycling companies -- to a 2:30 p.m. meeting at the County Office Building to discuss the issue.Commissioner Donald I. Dell said yesterday that he doesn't expect the board to reach any conclusions today. Mr. Dell said he does not want to change the current system, in which residents contract with private haulers.
NEWS
December 22, 1993
After the administration of County Executive Charles I. Ecker decided to end the local government's free bulk-trash pickup service as of Jan. 26, you might have thought the county was pulling the plug on free public education, judging by the semi-hysterical reaction of certain citizens and politicians.One group of Howard residents, upset over the move, even sent a poison-pen letter to Mr. Ecker -- though one of the complainers confessed that she has used the curbside service only twice in 19 years!
NEWS
July 6, 1994
If five Carroll County towns proceed with plans to have their solid waste dumped in a York, Pa., landfill, they could force the county government to re-think its entire solid waste collection and disposal system. This maneuver may have more impact on future solid waste plans than the newly reincarnated solid-waste study committee the county commissioners formed.When it comes to solid waste, the commissioners have made an unfortunate practice of ignoring the wishes of the county's municipalities.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Sun Staff Writer | July 1, 1994
Carroll should have an independent body to oversee garbage collection and disposal in the county, and the concept must be studied before such a group could be formed, the county commissioners said yesterday.But another study on garbage only delays a decision that could save county residents money, Westminster Mayor W. Benjamin Brown said.The commissioners voted unanimously to begin the process of forming a Solid Waste Authority that would have responsibility for daily operations at county landfills, the closing of landfills, and setting and collection of fees.
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