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NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | March 17, 1997
An article Monday incorrectly reported the number of projects sponsored by the Pew Center for Civic Journalism. In the four years since its establishment, the Pew Center has helped support 47 journalistic projects.The Sun regrets the error.PHILADELPHIA -- During the musicians' strike of the Philadelphia Orchestra last year, the Pew Charitable Trusts withdrew financial support from the orchestra. It cheered the musicians.Pew -- with assets of $3.7 billion, the country's sixth-richest foundation -- was not out to help the union.
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2012
Timothy D. Armbruster oversaw $80 million worth of philanthropic investments in Baltimore neighborhoods and projects during more than three decades steering the Goldseker Foundation, but a small one -- for $3,500 -- stands out as one of his favorites. Armbruster, who announced Tuesday that he will step down by next summer after 34 years, recalled how the foundation agreed to cover one-time costs to launch the Waverly Farmers' Market in the early 1980s. Still popular, the market has since spawned others around the region.
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NEWS
May 7, 1991
Recently, private foundations have advocated that privat industry or universities, under contract, run public schools. Yesterday, Mayor Kurt Schmoke said he was exploring one such proposal. We'd like to know what you think about this issue. Do you think that private industry or universities could do a better job of running public schools than the government does?The call is local and must be made from a tone phone. The SUNDIAL number is 783-1800 or, in Anne Arundel County, 268-7736. When you reach SUNDIAL enter category 4600 and wait for instructions from the announcer.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2010
Sometimes, your most valuable asset is a sense of skepticism, especially when people are telling you things you want to hear. That's what Kim Mallard discovered after a Las Vegas-based company came calling, offering access to grants from government agencies and nonprofit foundations in exchange for a fee — a pitch that the Federal Trade Commission and state attorneys general have repeatedly warned consumers to avoid. Mallard, who owns Hickory Station Pizzeria and Grill in Bel Air, said she got a call this summer from a man who said he helps small-business owners apply for grant money.
BUSINESS
By LESTER A. PICKER | October 24, 1994
Last week I explored some of the concerns grantmakers have when assessing requests for funding. My comments were prompted by remarks made by Wally Pinkard and Tim Armbruster, both foundation directors, during a recent panel presentation for Catholic Charities.Private foundations on the cutting edge of philanthropy typically look for ways their gifts can truly make a difference to an organization in carrying out a mission that is dear to the hearts of the foundation directors.They also seek to be a catalyst, rather than the sole source of support for an organization.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Evening Sun Staff | September 14, 1990
Unable to raise $27,000 from private foundations, a Baltimore group championing a proposal for a quasi-government non-profit insurance company has begun seeking donations and loans elsewhere.The City Wide Insurance Coalition wants individuals and churches to pay for a feasibility study of the insurance company. The group believes it is needed to provide a cheaper insurance alternative to city residents, who pay higher automobile premiums than people in other parts of the state."We are going to have to find sources more committed to social progress than profits," said Robert Kaufman, the president of CWIC.
NEWS
January 24, 2000
LET NO ONE be misled. State government must cover the very significant cost of any credible effort to curb the epidemic of lead paint poisoning in Baltimore. The job cannot be left to poor families or to private philanthropic foundations or to a poverty-stricken city. The scope of the problem is too great. Nor can it be done on the cheap. Enforcement alone will be futile -- as years of lax enforcement efforts and a model set of lead paint abatement laws should have made abundantly clear.
NEWS
By Patricia Meisol | November 16, 1990
Hoping to mollify lawmakers looking into the abuse of funds from college foundations, the University of Maryland is mapping out a plan for donors and presidents who are to testify Tuesday in Annapolis:Establish the "high moral ground" by recognizing that political contributions are barred by law; characterize violations as unwitting; assert that enough rules are in place to prevent abuses; and have donors testify that they are "uncomfortable" with state...
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | March 14, 2002
Nonprofit groups plan to build or renovate more than 330 homes for low-income residents in West Baltimore's Sandtown-Winchester neighborhood within three years, the next wave of an urban renewal program that some call a national model. The project will increase the number of homes constructed to nearly 900 since the effort began in the 1990s. "It's the next big effort for Sandtown," said Chickie Grayson, president of Enterprise Homes Inc., a subsidiary of the Enterprise Foundation, which is a partner with Baltimoreans United in Leadership Development (BUILD)
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2010
Sometimes, your most valuable asset is a sense of skepticism, especially when people are telling you things you want to hear. That's what Kim Mallard discovered after a Las Vegas-based company came calling, offering access to grants from government agencies and nonprofit foundations in exchange for a fee — a pitch that the Federal Trade Commission and state attorneys general have repeatedly warned consumers to avoid. Mallard, who owns Hickory Station Pizzeria and Grill in Bel Air, said she got a call this summer from a man who said he helps small-business owners apply for grant money.
NEWS
By Lynn Homeier Rauch and Betsy S. Nelson | December 19, 2008
The Baltimore region is blessed with a large number of grant makers: corporate giving programs, family and private foundations (local and national), giving circles, and donor-advised funds. The grant-making community in our area is alive, well - and very worried. Bad economic times mean greater challenges in meeting even the most basic human needs for food, shelter, and clothing. These conditions impact the very groups that serve the needy. We have already heard about a small community organization that bought office equipment with a loan it is now unable to repay.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,Sun Columnist | April 11, 2007
Finally! The Internal Revenue Service seemingly is cracking down on nonprofit organizations that don't properly disclose executive pay or sweetheart deals with insiders. In a recent dragnet, the agency said it nailed hundreds of nonprofit groups for "significant reporting issues" on pay or "significant reporting errors and omissions" on business transactions with directors and officers. But wait. Who are the organizations? What penalties will they pay for misleading the public they ask for charitable contributions?
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,Sun reporter | February 23, 2007
A family foundation might conjure up images of great wealth and multimillion-dollar endowments, of Rockefellers and Gateses, but the typical one is actually fairly modest. Nationally, more than a third have less than $250,000 in assets. Nearly two-thirds have less than $1 million. And both here and across the country, they're multiplying at a fast clip. "I don't see any minimal amount to starting a foundation," said Shoshana Shoubin Cardin, who gave to charity for years as an individual before launching the Baltimore County-based Shoshana S. Cardin Family Foundation in the late 1990s with $400,000 she had made from the sale of real estate.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | March 14, 2002
Nonprofit groups plan to build or renovate more than 330 homes for low-income residents in West Baltimore's Sandtown-Winchester neighborhood within three years, the next wave of an urban renewal program that some call a national model. The project will increase the number of homes constructed to nearly 900 since the effort began in the 1990s. "It's the next big effort for Sandtown," said Chickie Grayson, president of Enterprise Homes Inc., a subsidiary of the Enterprise Foundation, which is a partner with Baltimoreans United in Leadership Development (BUILD)
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | September 3, 2001
The Baltimore school system is planning a drive to raise tens of millions of dollars from private foundations and businesses to help repair and renovate many long-neglected schools. The goal of the capital fund-raising campaign, an unprecedented effort still in the planning stage, is to start chipping away at a backlog of more than $680 million in projects. "Part of it is how to make a quantum leap in resources in a short period of time, so you can begin to take a giant bite out of the problem," said Donald Manekin, the school system's former interim chief operating officer who is now a consultant for special projects.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | December 5, 2000
WASHINGTON - As a bright sun sparkled on the blue Tidal Basin water in Washington yesterday, a circle of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s fraternity brothers crossed hands and sang as the final act in dedicating land for a memorial to the civil rights leader, the first on the National Mall to honor a black person. Directly across the water stands the Jefferson Memorial, and in the distance the Lincoln Memorial could be glimpsed - which was not an accident, said Adrian L. Wallace, president of the Alpha Phi Alpha fraternity based in Baltimore and the foundation raising private money for the planned King memorial.
BUSINESS
By JULIUS WESTHEIMER | May 16, 1997
Sound pieces of investment advice piled up while I was in the hospital: Doctors' orders: "While 'income' investments play a major role in your retirement plan, be sure to keep a healthy portion of growth investments. Why? To fight inflation. You don't want your money to run out before you do." (Focus Newsletter.)Swallow with water: "If a stock goes down but the fundamentals remain unchanged, I don't sell. Day-to-day movements don't mean a thing. In a bear market look for good stocks that have been punished."
BUSINESS
By LESTER A. PICKER | January 3, 1994
In the never-ending quest for funding, nonprofit agencies constantly look to private foundations and corporations to provide at least part of the mix.But with government cutbacks, growth in the number of nonprofits, and the increased need for social services nationwide, competition for funds is at an all time high.A recent trip to confer with a Chicago corporation's charitable- giving program gave me an opportunity on the plane (more accurately, waiting in airports) to review what I call my "Ultimate Secrets" regarding the development of proposals to private foundations and corporations.
NEWS
January 24, 2000
LET NO ONE be misled. State government must cover the very significant cost of any credible effort to curb the epidemic of lead paint poisoning in Baltimore. The job cannot be left to poor families or to private philanthropic foundations or to a poverty-stricken city. The scope of the problem is too great. Nor can it be done on the cheap. Enforcement alone will be futile -- as years of lax enforcement efforts and a model set of lead paint abatement laws should have made abundantly clear.
NEWS
February 27, 1999
Battle over Kosovo is not a conflict that U.S. should enterAs a military retiree with combat experience in three wars, I would find the president's edicts to Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic and the Kosovo revolutionaries the height of folly if not for the danger of inserting our already depleted military into another civil war that is none of our business.The questions arise:Will Secretary of State Madeleine K. Albright's repeated farcical threats of U.S. or NATO military intervention stop anything?
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