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By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | July 26, 1991
WHAT THIS HOT summer movie season needs and now has is a good, old-fashioned private eye film starring Kathleen Turner as the detective.The movie is ''V.I. Warshawski,'' which is based on the mystery novels written by Sara Paretsky.In the film, Turner is Warshawski, a private eye who talks tough and when she needs to, dirty. She's a stunner in many ways. She is a physical stunner when it comes to dealing with her enemies, and she is a visual stunner when she is just moving about.She may be adept in the martial arts department, but she also likes to dress.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | June 8, 2013
Sherlock Holmes un-kicked the bucket way back in 1894. More than a century later, even though Harry Potter ends up on the wrong side of a killing curse, he un-bites the dust. In "Game of Thrones," Beric Dondarrion has un-bought the farm at least six times, despite having been hanged, impaled by a lance, bashed in the head with a mace and stabbed through the eye with a dagger. And that's just by the end of the third season. So author Walter Mosley had ample precedent to un-pull the plug on his most famous fictional creation, Ezekiel "Easy" Rawlins.
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NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | September 7, 1997
DON Crutchfield dived into the chicken salad, telling his stories between bites. In his navy blue sports jacket, blue polo shirt, blue jeans and brown loafers, he looked every bit like Joe Average. And you can bet that's the way he wanted it.Crutchfield, you see, has to blend in. He's a private investigator, a job he's had for the past 35 years."I once tailed a woman for six months," Crutchfield said, "and she never knew I was tailing her." In that incident Crutchfield was following the woman to get evidence for her husband of her infidelity.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 2010
The postman rings thrice in "A Woman, a Gun and a Noodle Shop" (opening Friday at the Charles). Director Zhang Yimou transfers the Coen brothers" "Blood Simple" — their merry-sadist variation on James M. Cain's "The Postman Always Rings Twice" — from 1985 Texas to an equally arid but wildly multihued landscape in feudal China. Cain's book is a lowdown masterpiece. The movies are trash with flash. But oh, what flash! The film that established the Coens as our reigning cinematic smart-alecks, "Blood Simple" told a simple story of a woman, a gun and a saloon.
BUSINESS
By Steve Lohr and Steve Lohr,New York Times News Service | February 20, 1992
HOUSTON -- Ed Pankau is a private investigator who seems to have walked off the pages of a pulp novel. A former Green Beret and the son of a bootlegger, the 46-year-old private eye has had his share of cases involving murder, mayhem and colorful characters.A green Bugatti sports car adorns his suburban driveway. He won it years ago in a jailhouse poker game from a client, a wealthy rancher accused of manslaughter. In Mr. Pankau's world there are good guys and bad guys. Mr. Pankau is a good guy; he invariably describes his quarry as "sleaze balls" or "dirt bags" or both.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | July 17, 1999
If you like your men in frilly aprons with a snub-nose .38 holstered on the belt, has A&E got someone for you.Spenser, Robert B. Parker's tough-talking private eye with a penchant for quoting the Great Books, is back in "Small Vices," a deliciously parboiled, modern-day, made-for-cable film noir premiering tomorrow night at 8 on the Arts & Entertainment channel.Joe Mantegna, who will next be seen in Barry Levinson's movie "Liberty Heights," plays Spenser. And while readers of the "Spenser" books might find him a little small for the role, he more than makes up for it in attitude and screen presence.
NEWS
December 14, 1996
Willie Rushton, 59, a cartoonist and broadcaster, died Wednesday in London. He was diabetic and had recently had heart surgery. He was one of the founders in 1961 of Private Eye, a magazine that mixed crusading journalism, satire and silliness. His film credits include "Those Magnificent Men in Their Flying Machines" (1965), "Nothing But The Best" (1964) and "Monte Carlo Or Bust" (1969).Pub Date: 12/14/96
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | March 13, 1992
The whole thing started when we were watching TV and I said the key ingredients to any good movie are car chases, serial killers and sex. Maybe a helicopter crash, too."What about plot?" she said. "What about character development?"Matter of fact, I said, I'm working on a film script myself."What about dramatic tension?" she said.This is how I see the film opening, I said.I see a high-speed chase on a lonely stretch of road in the High Sierras. There's a dope dealer with 200 pounds of cocaine in the back seat of his fire engine red Toyota Supra being hotly pursued by a hard-bitten private detective in a '79 Dodge Daytona.
FEATURES
By R. D. Heldenfels and R. D. Heldenfels,Knight-Ridder News Service | September 14, 1995
Viewers should be allowed some reasonable doubts about "Charlie Grace."The ABC series, which will premiere at 8 tonight on WMAR (Channel 2), is a sort of backhanded sequel to the early '90s series "Reasonable Doubts," which starred Mark Harmon as a police detective who worked with an assistant district attorney played by Marlee Matlin. In "Charlie Grace," Mr. Harmon is back as an ex-cop, now a private eye, and both series come from producer Robert Singer.At first look, "Charlie Grace" is not quite in the same league as "Reasonable Doubts," an uneven but occasionally intriguing series.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 2010
The postman rings thrice in "A Woman, a Gun and a Noodle Shop" (opening Friday at the Charles). Director Zhang Yimou transfers the Coen brothers" "Blood Simple" — their merry-sadist variation on James M. Cain's "The Postman Always Rings Twice" — from 1985 Texas to an equally arid but wildly multihued landscape in feudal China. Cain's book is a lowdown masterpiece. The movies are trash with flash. But oh, what flash! The film that established the Coens as our reigning cinematic smart-alecks, "Blood Simple" told a simple story of a woman, a gun and a saloon.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | November 9, 2008
I've always thought that the first and most perfect film noir was created by a guy named Homer. (And, no, children, I'm not referring to the animated cartoon star of The Simpsons, but to the ancient Greek poet.) There's a middle-aged guy on a boat who has fallen on hard times, but still is crafty like a fox. He's adrift at sea and utterly lost, but he won't ask for directions. During his adventures, he runs afoul of thugs and man-eating femme fatales.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 2006
The Black Dahlia What It's About: Top cops Aaron Eckhart and Josh Hartnett try to solve the instantly infamous case of a would-be starlet whose murder seemed to sum up the sick soul of post-World War II L.A. Rated: R The Scoop: Brian De Palma, the director, imbues the imagery with an obsessive grandeur even as the narrative falls apart. But the result is still a wan, unsatisfying follow-up to the great L.A. Confidential. Grade: B- Gridiron Gang What it's about: The Rock plays the real life juvenile probation officer who molded some of the toughest residents at Camp Kilpatrick, a "last chance" facility for underage felons, into a football team.
NEWS
By CHUCK PHILIPS and CHUCK PHILIPS,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 11, 2006
In his first interview in three years, jailed private eye Anthony Pellicano accused federal authorities of exaggerating the strength of their case against him, which he predicted would soon fizzle out like a box-office flop. Speaking by telephone from the federal Metropolitan Detention Center in Los Angeles last week, Pellicano insisted that he would never cooperate with authorities or testify against a bevy of A-list lawyers, Hollywood executives, business moguls and celebrities who have hired him over the years to dig up dirt on their adversaries.
ENTERTAINMENT
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | June 11, 2006
The script offered only five words of instruction: "Brenda looks in desk drawer." But actress Kyra Sedgwick, star of TNT's hit drama The Closer, transforms the mundane direction into a scene fraught with human complexities, frailties and obsessions. For two long minutes, her character, Los Angeles Police Deputy Chief Brenda Leigh Johnson, first steals quick glances, then gazes longingly at the drawer. Finally, Johnson, a veteran detective with an uncanny ability to elicit confessions from the most hardened criminals, yanks open the drawer and lunges at a vending-machine snack cake that's lying inside it. With abandon, she rips through the cellophane and into the sugar-laced confection with one reckless bite.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Sun Staff | October 19, 2003
By the time children hit sixth grade, they should probably be seen and heard, but must they be spied on? Never has privacy been a bigger issue for parents of middle schoolers. From instant messaging on the Internet to private cell phones, preteens have more ways than ever to keep Mom and Dad out of the loop. And parents have seemingly never been more intent on monitoring their offspring -- and they've got the computer software and old-fashioned snoopiness to do it. "I want to know everything they're doing and then I don't," says Carla Bohannan, an Annapolis mother of three whose youngest, Emily, is 11 years old. "As baby boomers, I know the things we did without our parents knowing.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,SUN STAFF | September 22, 2003
Mayor Martin O'Malley's administration wants to relinquish control of an indoor soccer arena to a private company that city officials expect will have the money to better operate the publicly owned sports facility in Canton. The plan to privatize the Clarence H. Du Burns Arena furthers the mayor's effort to cut costs by hiring private companies to more efficiently perform government functions. It also fits into the vision of prominent businessman Edwin F. Hale, whose Canton Crossing development is rising two blocks east of the arena, which is on Ellwood Avenue and is named for the city's first black mayor.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | March 5, 1994
The "Duckman" cometh, at 10:30 tonight on cable channel USA.It seems like everybody's trying to find "the next Simpsons" -- that hip, animated, adult comedy series that's going to work both as a cartoon and a parody of cartoons.L Remember Steven Spielberg's "Family Dog" on CBS -- arf, arf?ABC was the most recent outfit to think it had found the formula with "The Critic," which was created by some of the folks connected with "The Simpsons."ABC was wrong, and "The Critic" is on hiatus. Only its most fervent fans can hope for it to come back.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | August 25, 1995
Clive Barker has seemed one of those outlaw artists who pay fealty not to society or to art but only to the mandates of their own id. A horror novelist turned filmmaker ("Nightbreed," the original "Hellraiser"), he's drawn to imagery from the most recondite of sexual practices and is completely unafraid to push the limits of taste. He's a nasty boy, but he's got guts.But his new film, "Lord of Illusions," isn't the Bosch-stoned-on-peyote masterpiece he seems capable of making. Perhaps the major studio contract and big budget undercut his willingness to go beyond the beyond; perhaps the marketing boys got to him; perhaps he lost his nerve; perhaps the true curse of success is not damnation but banality.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee | March 12, 2003
Every summer, Rick Diggs and athletic directors from schools that play in the Maryland Interscholastic Athletic Association gather at a quiet retreat to discuss athletic budgets, trade stories and bond without pressure from players, parents and principals. Just as in previous summers, Diggs, the executive director of the MIAA - the governing body for male sports in the 26 private and parochial schools throughout the Baltimore area - last year proposed a rule to prohibit athletes from transferring into a member school from a public school during the academic year and immediately playing.
NEWS
By DAVE BARRY and DAVE BARRY,Knight Ridder/Tribune | May 14, 2000
It is time for True Crime Blotter, the feature in which we examine reports of actual crimes to see if they reveal important underlying truths about our society (no).We begin with a shocking crime that either was or was not committed in Springfield, Ill., last year, according to an article from the July 29 edition of The State Journal-Register sent in by many alert readers. This article states that a man told police that a neighbor "may have switched glass eyeballs with him." The man claimed that the neighbor "also had a glass eye, but apparently preferred the victim's," and that "his false eyeball was taken from his pocket and replaced with another one."
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