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NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | October 14, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The luncheon was scheduled for a 12: 30 p.m. start, but the attendees arrived early, bantering in chorus with the clatter of silverware and dishes.At precisely 1 p.m. -- just in time for television cameras to roll -- Ted Forstmann strode to the podium at the event at the National Press Club a few weeks ago. He slid on his glasses and peered down at his notes.The co-founder and chairman of Forstmann Little and Co. was about to tell those assembled why he had given $100 million of his money to the Children's Scholarship Fund (CSF)
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NEWS
June 21, 2014
Americans certainly do have open hearts, and many have spare rooms. However, before anyone in Baltimore considers housing one of the unaccompanied children from the human tsunami surging up our southern border, take my advice: Don't do it ( "Seeking open hearts and spare rooms," June 19). Aiding and abetting this crisis does nothing to solve the problem. We need an organized system of immigration, not something that resembles the sack of Rome. I've seen the photos of the situation in Texas and Arizona, and I am appalled.
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NEWS
By Dan Berger | April 27, 1998
Courageous senators waited until assured that Bill would veto it before passing a wild tax break for private education.God built the beaches, destroyed and then re-builds them. Only man builds condos on shifting sands.If only Kurt were so animated, engaged and all-there on this city's life and problems as he is when tearing down his governor./!Cheer up. Yeltsin's guy won.Pub Date: 4/27/98
EXPLORE
December 1, 2011
When it comes to public money for private schools and oversight of charter schools, the Harford County Board of Education and the administration of Harford County Public Schools have it right by being opposed. When it comes to public money for private schools and oversight of charter schools, the Harford County Board of Education and the administration of Harford County Public Schools have it right by being opposed. In the school system's recently-released 2012 legislative platform, Harford County Public Schools is against any public funding of private education and it's equally opposed to any new laws that would allow charter schools to operate without being required to comply with "state law and [Harford school]
NEWS
June 14, 2010
I was among the many thousands of Baltimore's working class and poor children who greatly benefited from a Catholic school education. The present closing of many Baltimore schools can be attributed to changing demographics, the nearly prohibitive cost of any private education (whether religious or secular), a wounded American economy and the lack of teaching nuns. Dan Rodricks' twisted reasoning ("Education and atonement," June 13) in equating the Baltimore school closures with the tragedy of child abuse was shrill and illogical.
EXPLORE
December 1, 2011
When it comes to public money for private schools and oversight of charter schools, the Harford County Board of Education and the administration of Harford County Public Schools have it right by being opposed. When it comes to public money for private schools and oversight of charter schools, the Harford County Board of Education and the administration of Harford County Public Schools have it right by being opposed. In the school system's recently-released 2012 legislative platform, Harford County Public Schools is against any public funding of private education and it's equally opposed to any new laws that would allow charter schools to operate without being required to comply with "state law and [Harford school]
NEWS
By Dan K. Morhaim | January 9, 2001
THE ISSUE OF public aid to private schools is divisive, pitting advocates of education against each other. But this fight can be avoided in a way that increases income for all Maryland schools while preserving the state's non-involvement in private education. We can create such a win-win scenario by establishing an educational materials buying consortium that would include public and private schools. The consortium would buy textbooks and other items, ranging from paper and pencils to desks and lab equipment.
NEWS
June 21, 2014
Americans certainly do have open hearts, and many have spare rooms. However, before anyone in Baltimore considers housing one of the unaccompanied children from the human tsunami surging up our southern border, take my advice: Don't do it ( "Seeking open hearts and spare rooms," June 19). Aiding and abetting this crisis does nothing to solve the problem. We need an organized system of immigration, not something that resembles the sack of Rome. I've seen the photos of the situation in Texas and Arizona, and I am appalled.
NEWS
November 3, 1996
Needed: Less acrimony, more compromiseI know there are two sides to every political issue, but there seems to be a common thread in recent politics of people who have lost the art of reasonable compromise, and of people who want to overturn our system instead of working to improve it. I hope this changes soon.For example, the Carroll County schools probably do have some areas where they could reduce costs. But overall, the county schools are considered effective, and so there is not a good reason to dismantle them, as one pair of candidates for the school board seems intent on proposing.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 9, 1999
WASHINGTON -- At the end of this month, 17-year-old Aaron Bagley will return to school and will worry from time to time about how his family in Raymond, Maine, will raise more than $5,000 for his tuition at a Catholic school in Portland.Because of the Bagleys' choice of Cheverus High School for Aaron, and in the future for his younger brother, Jody, and because they want the state to help pay the tuition, the Bagleys have become soldiers in a culture war.It is a growing battle that is moving from legislature to legislature and courthouse to courthouse.
NEWS
June 14, 2010
I was among the many thousands of Baltimore's working class and poor children who greatly benefited from a Catholic school education. The present closing of many Baltimore schools can be attributed to changing demographics, the nearly prohibitive cost of any private education (whether religious or secular), a wounded American economy and the lack of teaching nuns. Dan Rodricks' twisted reasoning ("Education and atonement," June 13) in equating the Baltimore school closures with the tragedy of child abuse was shrill and illogical.
NEWS
October 23, 2005
The Specialized Trauma Treatment, Advocacy & Recovery Center is providing private safety education for families. Presentations will be tailored to the family's needs and schedule. Parents can choose from several topics: stranger danger, good touch/bad touch, child abuse, safety rules, Internet safety, healthy relationships, sexual harassment, safe dating, dating violence, sexual assault and date-rape drugs. The cost is $45 per family per one-hour class. Information: Heidi Strominger, 410-290-6432.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 10, 2004
MONKTON - A line of "pre-first-graders" snaked through the hallway of St. James Academy in Monkton on Friday morning, then pupils stood beside the open door of a conference room and listened, silently, to the sounds of Russian being spoken within. Eleven private-school educators from Russia and two interpreters were inside, discussing education techniques and philosophies with academy officials. After a few minutes, the children went quietly back to their classrooms. St. James offers a pre-first-grade class to pupils who need an extra year of lessons between kindergarten and first grade.
NEWS
By Ronald J. Volpe | October 19, 2003
RECENT HEADLINES have screamed about how public colleges and universities in Maryland, Virginia and across the country have predicted significant --sometimes double-digit -- increases in tuition for next year and, in some cases, in mid-year. In Maryland, it has been suggested that tuition be doubled at our flagship public university. What has not made the news is the ever-narrowing gap between the cost of a four-year education at public and at private institutions. Today, and this may come as a surprise, through merit scholarships and need-based grants, tuition at schools such as Goucher, McDaniel, Hood or Villa Julie colleges, is less expensive than at the University of Maryland.
NEWS
March 8, 2002
Maryland children in private schools merit state support In the editorial regarding the $5 million the state is spending for private school textbooks, The Sun says there's nothing wrong with the idea that the state's obligation to educate should extend to needy children in all classrooms ("All mixed up on schools," March 1). But it goes on to say that "the state's first obligation is to its own children, the ones who attend public schools and couldn't dream of a private education ... it's near insulting ... to consider diverting public money to other kids."
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2001
When J. Tyson Tildon was appointed to the Baltimore Board of Education, he made no effort to hide the fact that his youngest daughter attends a private school. When people asked why he chose private over public, Tildon explained that he wanted her to begin learning a foreign language at an early age. "At the time, that didn't exist in the public schools," said Tildon, whose three older children attended public schools in Baltimore. Tildon is one of three public school board members in the Baltimore metropolitan area who have decided that a private education is best for their children.
FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | November 8, 1993
Public education, we keep hearing, is in crisis. Nobody seems to dispute that notion anymore.Read the headlines. Too many smart kids are bored. Too many poor kids drop out. Grades are inflated. And nobody can find Azerbaijan on a map.We can agree on the problems. Agreement on possible solutions comes a little harder. One often-discussed remedy made it onto the ballot in California last week. It's called the voucher system.You've heard of it, right? Presently, a local government spends X amount per student per year on public schooling.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,Sun Staff | March 24, 2000
The House of Delegates voted yesterday to spend state money to buy textbooks at private and parochial schools, all but assuring passage of the landmark measure before the General Assembly adjourns next month. The 72-68 vote came after a lengthy debate that reflected a deep division over the relative needs of public and private schools and, to a lesser degree, over the question of separating church and state. The Senate approved the $6 million textbook subsidy, a budget proposal by Gov. Parris N. Glendening, on a 27-19 vote last week.
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