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NEWS
October 12, 1996
EVERY BIG CHANGE brings big opportunities -- a truism not lost on private companies eager for government contracts. With the federal overhaul of social services, a number of large corporations -- some better known for defense contracts than administering social programs -- are hoping to take advantage of new opportunities.In Texas, for instance, the $30 billion defense giant Lockheed Martin is bidding against Electronic Data Systems, the company founded by H. Ross Perot, and Andersen Consulting, a subsidiary of the accounting firm Arthur Andersen, to run the state's welfare services.
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NEWS
By Gary Stroud and Anthony Coates | April 30, 2014
Earlier this year, the Baltimore Brew broke a story of a pilot program through HUD that would allow the Housing Authority of Baltimore City (HABC) to transition 22 public housing high-rises to private ownership over the next two years. Citing a lack of funding to make repairs to the buildings, HABC claims that the only way they can make capital improvements that the buildings require is to put them in the hands of private companies lured by lucrative tax incentive packages. Though the wheels have been in motion to implement this so-called "Rental Assistance Demonstration" (RAD)
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NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Staff Writer | January 22, 1993
In a first-of-its-kind arrangement, the Mass Transit Administration will pay two private companies to take over three bus routes that were to be dropped at the end of the month as a cost-saving measure.MTA officials yesterday announced they have awarded grants totaling $108,000 to Eatman Bus Service Inc. and Yellow Transportation Inc., both of Baltimore, to establish private shuttle service along the routes that were scheduled to be discontinued on Jan. 31.Eatman Bus will receive up to $85,000 over the next two years to serve two routes.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2013
Coming this fall: advertisements pitching the opportunity to buy into hedge funds, private equity funds or early-stage companies. The Securities and Exchange Commission lifted last week a Depression-era ban against private companies advertising the sale of securities that don't have to be registered with regulators. That rule had been put in place to protect investors because such securities are considered a riskier investment. Many entrepreneurs and young companies hailed the regulatory move, which will allow them to raise capital by pitching private offerings through tweets, email, print ads or other outlets.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | June 15, 1999
Dozens of municipal employees wearing pro-union buttons and T-shirts and waving signs massed in front of Baltimore City Hall yesterday and warned officials facing re-election this year to protect their jobs against privatization.Chanting "Save our jobs" and waving signs that read "Labor United, Save Our City!", the workers threatened to retaliate at the polls if city leaders eliminated their jobs and hired private companies to perform municipal services. The protest occurred at the last City Council meeting until Sept.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | September 8, 1998
When the state put up $9.75 million to fund a new private investment company two years ago, lawmakers' intent was to attract an even greater amount of federal grants and provide a source of venture capital for disadvantaged small businesses in Maryland.So far, though, the private fund has invested more of the state's money in out-of-state companies than Maryland firms. Of the $3.3 million it has put to work, $2.25 million has gone to two companies in California and Texas.In addition, the investment company's owners have another company that manages state small business loans and the two firms use funds they receive under state contracts to rent office space from their own top officials.
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN STAFF | March 20, 1998
Private prison operators want a chance to build and run a women's prison at Jessup, corporate executives told a House committee yesterday.Officers from four companies said they run prisons around the country, saving states as much as 15 percent, offering better buildings and programs and still earning a profit."
NEWS
By Gary Stroud and Anthony Coates | April 30, 2014
Earlier this year, the Baltimore Brew broke a story of a pilot program through HUD that would allow the Housing Authority of Baltimore City (HABC) to transition 22 public housing high-rises to private ownership over the next two years. Citing a lack of funding to make repairs to the buildings, HABC claims that the only way they can make capital improvements that the buildings require is to put them in the hands of private companies lured by lucrative tax incentive packages. Though the wheels have been in motion to implement this so-called "Rental Assistance Demonstration" (RAD)
NEWS
By Elaine Tassy and Elaine Tassy,SUN STAFF | July 7, 1996
An article that appeared Sunday misstated the employer of Donovan Kisamore, a participant in a work-release program. He works for Rockingham Construction Co.The Sun regrets the error.For Donovan Kisamore and hundreds of other Marylanders convicted of minor crimes, home is not only where the heart is, but where the monitor, ankle strap and jail sentence are, too.Private companies have joined government agencies in watching over petty offenders who are ordered to serve home detention instead of jail time -- offenders such as Kisamore, who is serving time at his Middle River home for a battery conviction.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | January 7, 1999
Facing a $25 million budget deficit next year, Baltimore took its first step yesterday toward possibly hiring private companies to handle city services such as trash collection.The city Board of Estimates voted 4-1 to spend $137,000 to hire two consultants who will study the possibility. The vote came after city unions angrily opposed the move, saying it would lead to extensive layoffs of the city's 25,000 employees.Cities such as Indianapolis and Philadelphia have gained national attention for allowing private companies to compete with city workers for service contracts.
NEWS
By Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2013
Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown said a bill that would allow private companies to help build public works projects will get the governor's signature tomorrow. Lawmakers approved the bill laying out rules for public-private partnerships on Monday afternoon, the last day of General Assembly session. In an interview, Brown said the legislation two years in the making could allow a private company to finance the propose Purple Line, the Red Line or create a second crossing of the Nice Bridge connecting Charles County to Virginia.
NEWS
January 16, 2013
When is Gov. Martin O'Malley going to be satisfied? He has spent all of Maryland's taxpayer dollars and then some since being elected, and now he wants to spend even more on wind power from the ocean, despite having been elected in part on a campaign promise to reduce spending ("O'Malley readies new offshore wind bid," Jan. 12) Instead, he has increased taxes and fees and increased spending. Doesn't the governor read the news stories about the billions of tax dollars being wasted on green companies that have gone bankrupt?
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | December 18, 2012
Introduction of an executive order creating a new Harford County Department of Emergency Services, that will give the county executive greater oversight of the privately run fire and emergency medical service, has been pushed back once again. The whole process might be anti-climactic, however, after the county's fire and EMS association voted unanimously Monday night to support the latest draft of the executive order. Executive Order 12-8 by Harford County Executive David Craig is expected to be introduced by the Harford County Council at its legislative session Tuesday evening.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | November 30, 2012
The empty lot in West Baltimore is usually a desolate spot, the sort of place people visit to leave an old mattress in the bushes or sneak a drink at night. But this week, chain saws buzzed, trucks rumbled and residents shoveled compost at North Fulton and Lorman streets in Sandtown-Winchester as workers set up a 3,300-square-foot organic greenhouse, breaking ground on one of the city's biggest entries in the fast-growing national movement known as urban farming. The farm, now called Strength to Love Farms, will eventually be able to grow more than 150,000 pounds of fresh produce a year, all to be sold and distributed locally, according to Alex Persful, president and chief horticulturist of the urban agriculture firm Big City Farms.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2012
Two city transportation employees were indicted by a Baltimore court Tuesday for allegedly selling $30,000 worth of city-owned scrap metal to a private company and pocketing the proceeds, according to the Office of the State's Attorney. Lee Kane, a traffic signal maintenance supervisor, and Theodore Wojtas, a traffic signal construction maintenance superintendent, allegedly sold more than 300,000 pounds of metal from the city transportation department's Poncabird facility, according to the state's attorney office.
EXPLORE
RECORD STAFF REPORT | December 22, 2011
Artesian Water Maryland, a subsidiary of Artesian Resources Corporation, announced Wednesday it has completed the purchase of several Cecil County local water systems, including the water system of the Town of Port Deposit. Artesian purchased the water system and assets of the Town of Port Deposit, including access to the Susquehanna River as a water supply, the company said in a news release. On the eastern end of the county, Artesian built an interconnection between its Delaware water utility subsidiary and the Town of Elkton and invested in system upgrades to ensure up to 1.5 million gallons of water a day to Elkton and sufficient additional capacity to serve Cecil County's growth corridor as it develops, the company said.
BUSINESS
December 10, 1995
The state government will sponsor its first Maryland Technology College Showcase Tuesday and Wednesday at the University of Baltimore Business Center. The event, which includes exhibits by dozens of information technology companies, runs from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. each day. Admission is $5.The showcase, which the Glendening administration has said is intended to educate Marylanders on the impact that technology will have on their lives, includesworkshops on the Internet, new cable television technologies, electronic commerce and on-line resources.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | November 30, 2011
Rep. C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger, the top Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee, and Republican committee Chairman Mike Rogers introduced legislation Wednesday that would allow the government to share classified information on potential cyberattacks with private businesses. The bipartisan bill aims to improve communication between the federal agencies that focus on cybersecurity, which have been wary of discussing intelligence information outside the government, and private companies, which have been reluctant to publicize attacks on their computer systems.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | January 16, 2011
For every powerhouse like Google, there are dozens of Internet companies that flop. Still, a decade after the dot-com bubble that burst, there is no shortage of investors trying to get a piece of the next online blockbuster. Lately, much of the hype has centered on social media. While many of the big names — Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter — may sell stock publicly through IPOs one day, they have been raising capital by selling stakes to institutional investors, venture capitalists and wealthy investors.
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