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NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | August 21, 2003
In a gesture aimed at softening the hardships of living amid airport noise and traffic, state officials awarded grants yesterday to three communities near Baltimore-Washington International Airport to improve sidewalks, trim trees and paint speed bumps. The grants, which total about $225,500, are the largest given since the state created the community enhancement program two years ago. The program, which grew from a bill sponsored by Democratic state Sen. James E. DeGrange Sr., authorizes the state to contribute $1 for each takeoff and landing into a fund for transportation-related improvements within the airport's noise zone.
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NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | May 14, 2013
The formerly city-owned Barclay Recreation Center will make its debut as a privately run community center May 18, serving the Charles Village area, including the Abell, Oakenshawe, Harwood and Old Goucher communities. A grand opening celebration, possibly with Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake in attendance, is scheduled from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the center, 2900 Barclay St., in the Charles Village area. The Baltimore City Department of Recreation and Parks last year turned over the underutilized, 7,300-square-foot facility to the city public school next door, Barclay Elementary/Middle, to operate as a social and education center in a public-private partnership with the nonprofit Greater Homewood Community Corp.
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NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins | December 14, 2001
Emerson might look a lot like its forebear to the north, but another Howard Research and Development neighborhood nearby will not be Columbia-style. Stone Lake, on a 137-acre parcel used until the late 1960s as a quarry, will be a gated residential community, said David Forester, the company's senior vice president and senior development director. Seventy single-family houses and 154 townhouses are planned. North of Gorman Road and east of Interstate 95, the development runs for nearly a mile along the Middle Patuxent River.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | August 21, 2003
In a gesture aimed at softening the hardships of living amid airport noise and traffic, state officials awarded grants yesterday to three communities near Baltimore-Washington International Airport to improve sidewalks, trim trees and paint speed bumps. The grants, which total about $225,500, are the largest given since the state created the community enhancement program two years ago. The program, which grew from a bill sponsored by Democratic state Sen. James E. DeGrange Sr., authorizes the state to contribute $1 for each takeoff and landing into a fund for transportation-related improvements within the airport's noise zone.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | May 14, 2013
The formerly city-owned Barclay Recreation Center will make its debut as a privately run community center May 18, serving the Charles Village area, including the Abell, Oakenshawe, Harwood and Old Goucher communities. A grand opening celebration, possibly with Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake in attendance, is scheduled from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the center, 2900 Barclay St., in the Charles Village area. The Baltimore City Department of Recreation and Parks last year turned over the underutilized, 7,300-square-foot facility to the city public school next door, Barclay Elementary/Middle, to operate as a social and education center in a public-private partnership with the nonprofit Greater Homewood Community Corp.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | July 1, 1998
Grace and Jerry Lancelotta sat on their front porch yesterday with their son Jim, smiling as a university president and the mayor of Baltimore prepared to dig up their lawn.Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke and Gallaudet University president I. King Jordan came for the groundbreaking of one of the grandest family projects in Baltimore's history: the construction of the nation's first privately funded housing community exclusively for elderly people who are deaf.Historians and sociologists who study the deaf say the $150 million complex -- to be built over several years on the Lancelottas' little-known, 34-acre estate on Baltimore's southwest edge -- will boost the Washington-Baltimore area's role as the unofficial capital of deaf culture.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | July 25, 1999
The state Board of Morticians wants to add a set of guidelines to its regulations in an attempt to stop people from using a private beach on the Chesapeake Bay to dispose of the ashes of loved ones.The board began contemplating guidelines on how to properly dispose of cremated remains last fall, after residents of a cozy Pasadena community as picturesque as its name -- Venice on the Bay -- began complaining about visitors scattering ashes from their beach.The board's guidelines remind people that even though the state does not require that cremated remains be placed in a cemetery, "this does not mean that cremated remains can be freely scattered or otherwise disposed of upon public domain, or upon the private property of another person."
NEWS
November 2, 2008
The National Family Resiliency Center Inc., a private community nonprofit group serving families in Columbia, offers support groups for elementary, middle and high school students whose parents are separated or divorced. The groups offer a chance to learn strategies to cope with feelings and family change. The cost is on a sliding scale. Information: Sarah Fishbein, 410-740-9553.
NEWS
August 26, 1991
Mandarin Construction Co., a leading builder in Anne Arundel County,is now engaged in its first-ever Eastern Shore project, a private residential community on Kent Island.Dubbed "Crosswinds," the community is located at the southern tip of the island, and includes 76 acres set aside as a wildlife sanctuary.
NEWS
June 2, 2011
Thanks for the great article by Timothy Wheeler ("Maryland Port Administration greening an old harbor dumping ground," May 28) about the restoration of Masonville Cove to an urban nature park and bird sanctuary. The Baltimore Community Foundation is proud to have been an early investor in this project through our 2006 support of an outreach coordinator to ensure that there was community input and participation in the project. The terrific result — a cleaner, greener and more vibrant Masonville Cove — highlights what is possible when the community is given the opportunity to exercise its voice in major development projects.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins | December 14, 2001
Emerson might look a lot like its forebear to the north, but another Howard Research and Development neighborhood nearby will not be Columbia-style. Stone Lake, on a 137-acre parcel used until the late 1960s as a quarry, will be a gated residential community, said David Forester, the company's senior vice president and senior development director. Seventy single-family houses and 154 townhouses are planned. North of Gorman Road and east of Interstate 95, the development runs for nearly a mile along the Middle Patuxent River.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | July 25, 1999
The state Board of Morticians wants to add a set of guidelines to its regulations in an attempt to stop people from using a private beach on the Chesapeake Bay to dispose of the ashes of loved ones.The board began contemplating guidelines on how to properly dispose of cremated remains last fall, after residents of a cozy Pasadena community as picturesque as its name -- Venice on the Bay -- began complaining about visitors scattering ashes from their beach.The board's guidelines remind people that even though the state does not require that cremated remains be placed in a cemetery, "this does not mean that cremated remains can be freely scattered or otherwise disposed of upon public domain, or upon the private property of another person."
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | July 1, 1998
Grace and Jerry Lancelotta sat on their front porch yesterday with their son Jim, smiling as a university president and the mayor of Baltimore prepared to dig up their lawn.Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke and Gallaudet University president I. King Jordan came for the groundbreaking of one of the grandest family projects in Baltimore's history: the construction of the nation's first privately funded housing community exclusively for elderly people who are deaf.Historians and sociologists who study the deaf say the $150 million complex -- to be built over several years on the Lancelottas' little-known, 34-acre estate on Baltimore's southwest edge -- will boost the Washington-Baltimore area's role as the unofficial capital of deaf culture.
NEWS
September 22, 1992
A road leading into Greenbriar, a new affordable housing community in Annapolis, has been named after Yevola S. Peters, the woman who fought for years to make the dream of affordable housing come true.Ms. Peters spent 21 years with the city's Community Action Agency, helping elderly people, impoverished families and the homeless. She retired last year from her post as executive director.South County Residential Projects Inc., a non-profit group founded in 1969 to build more affordable housing, decided to pay tribute to her by naming a road leading into Greenbriar after her. Peters Way is the main route off Bywater Road to the community of 35 town houses.
BUSINESS
By a Sun Staff Writer | January 15, 1995
If you've ever dreamed of owning a deluxe, 3,500-square-foot log home on 4 1/2 acres, write to Jim Cooper of Frederick. Your pithy prose could win you the spread.Mr. Cooper, a writer and builder, is offering his home, "Laurel Lodge," in an essay contest. He got the idea when he read about a bed and breakfast in Maine sold the same way.For $100, participants can submit a 150-word essay telling why they "dream of owning a beautiful log home in the woods." Laurel Lodge has five bedrooms, three and a half baths, two stone fireplaces and a whirlpool tub in the master suite.
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