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NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | July 1, 2006
William T. Washington, who managed the famed Sphinx Club on Pennsylvania Avenue for nearly 40 years, died of renal failure Monday at his West Baltimore home. He was 77. Mr. Washington, who was called "Wash," "Sweet Pea" or "Willie Wash" by legions of his friends, was born in Baltimore and raised on Arlington Avenue on the west side. He was a 1948 graduate of Douglass High School. After serving as a postal worker for eight years, he became manager in 1956 of the Sphinx Club in the 2100 block of Pennsylvania Ave. The Sphinx, which replaced the Club Manhattan, was established by Charles P. Tilghman.
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FEATURES
By ALICE STEINBACH | January 30, 1992
Just in case you missed it, here's a late-breaking item from my Washington, D.C., "Boys Will Be Boys" file:Last Saturday night, the 79th annual Alfalfa Club party for powerful-men-only -- women are not welcome at this exclusive private club -- attracted more than 500 of the country's top movers and shakers. And what a guest list it was!President Bush was there. And so was Vice President Quayle, Chief Justice William Rehnquist, Secretary of State James Baker and a whole host of senators -- including Alan Simpson, Lloyd Bentsen and Sam Nunn -- congressmen and corporate big shots.
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | March 15, 1992
Imagine a lifestyle of gourmet dinners and vintage wines, all elegantly prepared and served. That's what members of the Baltimore Chaper of Chaine de Rotisseurs enjoy every six to eight weeks.Chaine, founded in 1248 in Paris, is said to be the largest and oldest gastronomic organization in the world. Membership originally was limited to "masters" in the art of roasting geese. However, today's members share a broader interest in food, wine and etiquette -- although each still must own a rotisserie, a rule stemming from the founding fathers.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Staff Writer | June 27, 1993
DENTON -- Except for the occasional din of hammer and power saw in a small room above Cindy's Uptown Market, it is so quiet in this part of town that one can hear the bees whirring among the clover.For some unknown reason, the metal gate to the basketball court next door is locked shut, so no one plays ball on this sunny Saturday afternoon. The streets are nearly empty, and even the police cars that made repeated patrols through this neighborhood the night before are gone.Considering that an outbreak of racial unrest rocked this Caroline County town of 3,000 residents into the early morning hours of Friday, prompting an emergency visit by Gov. William Donald Schaefer and his top aides, stillness prevailed here yesterday like the silence after a storm.
FEATURES
By Dave Barry | October 14, 1990
Those of you who care deeply about America's future will be alarmed by the continuing efforts of high-level Republicans to recruit me as an influential national leader.The method they're using is direct mail. As you may recallseveral months ago I reported that I had received a letter from U.S. Sen. Bob Dole, inviting me to join the Republican Senatorial Inner Circle, a prestigious group open only to those Americans who meet the rigorous entrance requirement of forking over $1,000.Senator Dole's letter said that for an additional $285, I could go to Washington for a "closed-door briefing" with "key Washington officials," plus attend a dinner-dance with President and Mrs. Bush.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | July 6, 2005
Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. addressed criticism yesterday of a fund-raiser he hosted at an all-white country club by saying its membership is "not my business," and he complained of a "double standard" because there was no outcry when prominent Democrats held events there. Speaking on WBAL-AM yesterday morning, Ehrlich, a Republican, said the decision to hold an event at the Elkridge Club on June 20 was made by his campaign staff, not by him. Members of the club told The Sun last week that it has never had a black member in its 127-year history.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | September 14, 1998
The Private Clubs team put its superior shotmaking on display where it would do the most good -- in singles -- as it registered an 11 1/2 - 1/2 decision for the first one-sided victory in the fourth annual match against a Public Links team.After yesterday's play at Caves Valley Golf Club following Saturday's matches at Pine Ridge Golf Course, the final score was 22 1/2 -1 1/2 .The Private side, featuring mostly champions of their respective clubs, went beyond the 15th hole in only four of the 12 matches.
NEWS
April 8, 1994
There is nothing wrong with people of common backgrounds and interests forming clubs and enjoying each other's company. Sometimes these groups limit membership. There is not necessarily anything wrong with this, either. The fact that some men enjoy male-only clubs and people of a certain ethnic heritage belong to groups open only to others of the same extraction is not always a sign of prejudice.Certainly no one who was in Annapolis this week for a legislative hearing attended by the Elks and other clubs that exclude pTC women could say they sensed any malicious intent.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,Sun Staff Writer | February 13, 1995
The Annapolis city council will vote tonight on a bill that would revoke the liquor license of any social club that officially admits women and minorities, but excludes them in practice.The bill, sponsored by Ward 7 Alderman M. Theresa DeGraff, is aimed at local social clubs whose memberships are all-male or all-white. The measure would expand an earlier bill, approved in 1990. That bill denied a social club the right to sell alcohol if the institution's bylaws banned women and minorities.
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