Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPrivate And Parochial
IN THE NEWS

Private And Parochial

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | March 25, 2005
The state high school athletic association of New York has agreed to permit its athletes to compete with those from Maryland's private and parochial schools. Ned Sparks, executive director of the Maryland Public Secondary Schools Athletic Association, confirmed yesterday that the New York State Public High School Athletic Association has accepted an agreement between the MPSSAA and several organizations representing Maryland's non-public schools that paves the way for athletes from all schools to participate in sporting events that include New York athletes or are based in New York.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Thomas E. Wilcox | October 5, 2010
When the Archdiocese of Baltimore recently agreed to lease the building that housed the Shrine of the Sacred Heart School to the Baltimore City Public Schools, it opened the door for a long-awaited K-8 school in Mount Washington. But it is also worth celebrating as an exciting example of a larger movement in greater Baltimore. Three groups of schools — public, parochial and independent — are striving for excellence on their own, but they are also reaching out in new ways to help the others move forward.
Advertisement
NEWS
March 27, 2000
THE first obligation of Maryland's governor and legislators in the area of education is to create and foster "a thorough and efficient System of Free Public Schools." That's in the state constitution. There is no mention of subsidizing private and parochial schools. Clearly, state officials haven't done all they could to give Maryland "a thorough and efficient" public school system. Not when fewer than 15 percent of Baltimore City pupils read at grade level. Not when many schools throughout Maryland have dog-eared, 20-year-old textbooks.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | March 25, 2005
The state high school athletic association of New York has agreed to permit its athletes to compete with those from Maryland's private and parochial schools. Ned Sparks, executive director of the Maryland Public Secondary Schools Athletic Association, confirmed yesterday that the New York State Public High School Athletic Association has accepted an agreement between the MPSSAA and several organizations representing Maryland's non-public schools that paves the way for athletes from all schools to participate in sporting events that include New York athletes or are based in New York.
NEWS
By CARL T. ROWAN | May 29, 1992
Washington. -- We had a big and ominous business merger in the field of education this week. Tennessee entrepreneur Chris Whittle induced Benno C. Schmidt Jr. to leave the presidency of Yale University to run an education-for-profit scheme called the Edison Project.By laying out some big bucks for Mr. Schmidt's name and prestige, Mr. Whittle obviously raised the stock of his plan to prove that if paid about $5,500 per pupil per year, his schools can deliver better education than the public schools.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,Staff Writer | September 14, 1993
Representatives of the Maryland Scholastic Association's member schools voted last night to dissolve the organization that has governed area boys high school athletics for 75 years.In an Aug. 25 meeting, MSA vice president Mark Schlenoff and several other MSA officials had concluded there was no reason for the 35-member MSA to continue after its 15 public school members in Baltimore had joined the statewide Maryland Public Secondary Schools Athletic Association.In a 20-5 vote at Gilman last night, members present also decided to discontinue the MSA name but to maintain financial support -- such as paying for trophies and officials -- through the 1993-94 seasons in all sports.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | April 1, 2001
A joint committee of ranking state legislators agreed yesterday to spend $5 million in taxpayer funds to purchase textbooks for students at private and parochial schools, essentially settling the contentious matter for the year. The decision by the group of five delegates and five senators is considered certain to be upheld by the full Senate and House of Delegates tomorrow. The General Assembly last year approved spending $6 million on the textbook aid, although only about $5 million was spent.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | March 29, 1998
Parents of private and parochial school students would receive a tax break for donating computer equipment to their children's schools, but parents of public school students would not under legislation that received preliminary approval in the House of Delegates yesterday.Before clearing the measure for a final vote tomorrow, delegates voted 71-55 to reject an amendment by Del. Dan K. Morhaim that would have made donations to public schools eligible for the tax break.The Baltimore County Democrat said parents of public school children would be interested in making such donations.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | January 30, 2005
Officials from Anne Arundel County private and parochial schools say a proposed overhaul of county land-use laws would hamper their efforts to expand by forcing them to meet arduous requirements normally reserved for commercial developers. Under the proposed laws, private schools seeking to add buildings would have to document possible traffic impacts, much as the developers of strip malls and office buildings do. Schools in residential areas would have to go through "special exception" hearings if they wanted to have more than 125 parking spaces.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | January 16, 1999
For the second straight Friday and the second day in a row, icy weather canceled classes in most local school systems yesterday forcing athletic officials to postpone events.Despite the weather woes, officials said there is still no significant backlog of postponed games.Most games in Anne Arundel County went on as usual yesterday, because schools there opened after a two-hour delay.Broadneck's boys and girls basketball games at Annapolis were postponed, however, because of a leak in the gym roof.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | January 30, 2005
Officials from Anne Arundel County private and parochial schools say a proposed overhaul of county land-use laws would hamper their efforts to expand by forcing them to meet arduous requirements normally reserved for commercial developers. Under the proposed laws, private schools seeking to add buildings would have to document possible traffic impacts, much as the developers of strip malls and office buildings do. Schools in residential areas would have to go through "special exception" hearings if they wanted to have more than 125 parking spaces.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | January 30, 2005
Officials from Anne Arundel County private and parochial schools say a proposed overhaul of county land-use laws would hamper their efforts to expand by forcing them to meet arduous requirements normally reserved for commercial developers. Under the proposed laws, private schools seeking to add buildings would have to document possible traffic impacts, much as the developers of strip malls and office buildings do. Schools in residential areas would have to go through "special exception" hearings if they wanted to have more than 125 parking spaces.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | November 28, 2001
BACK IN 1998, the folks who run the Children's Scholarship Fund of Baltimore surprised everyone but themselves when 20,000 kids from low-income families applied for 400 scholarships to the city's parochial and private schools. The amazing thing was that they did it without a great deal of publicity and with no newspaper or television advertising. Final tabulations showed that 44 percent of eligible Baltimore families applied for the scholarships, financed in part by a small group of businessmen who wanted to prove that city children in public schools would switch to parochial and private schools given the chance and the wherewithal.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | April 1, 2001
A joint committee of ranking state legislators agreed yesterday to spend $5 million in taxpayer funds to purchase textbooks for students at private and parochial schools, essentially settling the contentious matter for the year. The decision by the group of five delegates and five senators is considered certain to be upheld by the full Senate and House of Delegates tomorrow. The General Assembly last year approved spending $6 million on the textbook aid, although only about $5 million was spent.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | March 27, 2001
THE MARYLAND General Assembly is poised to repeat its blunder of the last session and send at least $5 million to private and parochial schools to pay for textbooks. Gov. Parris Glendening, with money from a $1 billion budget surplus spilling out of his pockets, made this gesture last year, and it was approved by the legislators after acrimonious debate. Apparently nobody thought to ask if this was a one-time deal. As it turns out, it was not. Glendening actually proposed to increase the book money this time around, but the legislators cut it back.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | March 10, 2001
In a surprising setback for Maryland's nonpublic schools, a House committee voted narrowly last night to cut the $8 million Gov. Parris N. Glendening had proposed to help private and parochial schools purchase textbooks. After a day of intense lobbying by both sides in the highly charged issue, the Appropriations Committee, on a 14-12 vote, rejected an effort by the panel chairman, Del. Howard P. Rawlings, to preserve $5 million of the spending. The committee's cut is hardly a final resolution of the issue, because the House of Delegates and the Senate must agree on whether to send more money to nonpublic schools before the state budget for next year is approved early next month.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | June 11, 1996
If I have a child remaining in a public school system, and I see Friday's front page story about the construction boom in the private and parochial schools around Baltimore, then I ask myself a disturbing question this morning: Am I delivering to my kid a future of second-class citizenship?The McDonoghs and Boys' Latins are spending money with both hands these days, and why not? The Bryn Mawrs and the St. Paul's schools have seen the future, and it looks bright with desperate public school refugees banging on their doors with checkbooks in hand.
NEWS
By Paul Delaney | September 6, 1999
WHEN I, of strong southern black Baptist upbringing, attended Catholic school for a year, I was subjected to sustained proselytizing, was required to study religion (guess which one) and to attend mass every Wednesday morning.I did mind, but I was only a kid. However, I resisted the pressure and happily went back to public school. But that experience shaped forever my views on state-church relations: The constitutional separation must be upheld.Even if church officials from all denominations swore on a Bible that they would not proselytize their young wards, the schools should never be financed by public funds, especially at the expense of the public school system.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | December 20, 2000
RUXTON COUNTRY School opened a $4 million addition this fall, effectively doubling classroom space at the Owings Mills independent school. But the school was at capacity from the first day in its new digs, and Ruxton isn't an unusual case. The state's independent schools are in something of a crisis. They're too successful. Record numbers of kids are being turned away, particularly in the "crunch years," kindergarten and sixth grade. Many of the schools have waiting lists of 25 or more children in each class.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | July 12, 2000
SCHOOLS THAT ARE small, rural and have a low percentage of minority students are more likely to be technologically sophisticated, according to a report from one of the nation's leading education research companies. In other words, the "digital divide" is for real. The research firm, Market Data Retrieval, developed a Tech Sophistication Index (TSI) and used it to measure the technological development of public, private and parochial schools nationwide. Maryland is among the 10 states with the nation's lowest TSI scores, with Mississippi, Alabama, Louisiana, Oklahoma, Arkansas, California, Arizona, Pennsylvania and Connecticut.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.