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Privacy Policy

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NEWS
March 3, 2011
BmoreShopping.com strives to offer its visitors the many advantages of Internet technology and to provide an interactive and personalized experience. This policy covers how we treat personally identifiable information and other information that we collect, store, and receive, including information related to your use of our products and services. Personally identifiable information is information about you that is personally identifiable, such as your name, address, email address, or phone number, and that is not otherwise publicly available.
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NEWS
By Nayana Davis and Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2013
Marylanders who signed up for coverage through the state's new health insurance exchange did so under the condition that their information could be shared with law enforcement. The policy sparked debate in the conservative blogosphere after the Weekly Standard published a post saying it raised privacy concerns. "We will not sell your information to others. Any information that you provide to us in your application will be used only to carry out the functions of Maryland Health Connection," the policy states.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Reid Kanaley and Reid Kanaley,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 23, 2000
If you assume your personal data are safe at a Web site with a fancy "privacy policy," then, privacy experts say, one thing about you is already exposed: You're gullible. "Privacy policies are not worth the pixels they're printed on," said Fred Davis, a privacy advocate whose California company, Lumeria Inc., is among many new firms offering services to shield computer users from online snoops. Many Web businesses have hoped that privacy policies - voluntary statements listing how their sites intend to use the information they collect about visitors - would prove that self-regulation, rather than government intervention, can ensure the safety of personal data online.
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | July 4, 2013
Maryland joined 22 other states this week in sending a letter to Google saying more needs to be done to protect consumers' privacy. Thirty-six attorneys general wrote to Google more than a year ago about privacy concerns. Maryland AG Doug Gansler said Wednesday Google officials met with the state regulators and made some changes, “but there is still much more to do and we plan to keep up the pressure.” Now a new letter has been sent to CEO Larry Page, making further suggestions to improve customers' privacy.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2012
Online privacy issues jumped to the forefront Wednesday in Maryland as the attorney general challenged Google Inc.'s new privacy policy, a few days after a pair of Baltimore attorneys filed a class-action lawsuit against Facebook Inc. for allegedly tracking users who ventured off its online social network. Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler sent a letter to Google that demanded a meeting in a week about the company's changes to its privacy policy, which gives the Internet company deeper access to users' data across its services, such as Gmail and YouTube.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis and Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2013
Marylanders who signed up for coverage through the state's new health insurance exchange did so under the condition that their information could be shared with law enforcement. The policy sparked debate in the conservative blogosphere after the Weekly Standard published a post saying it raised privacy concerns. "We will not sell your information to others. Any information that you provide to us in your application will be used only to carry out the functions of Maryland Health Connection," the policy states.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose and Eileen Ambrose,SUN STAFF | October 26, 1999
As Congress gets ready to vote on overhauling Depression-era banking laws, consumer advocates warn that the new rules would lead to higher fees and privacy invasions."
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | September 24, 2003
JetBlue Airways Corp., a low-fare carrier whose sales nearly doubled last year, was sued yesterday by customers for disclosing passenger information to a Defense Department contractor. Two lawsuits, filed in a state court in Salt Lake City and federal court in Los Angeles, seek class action status to represent passengers whose names, addresses, phone numbers and flight itineraries were disclosed to Torch Concepts of Huntsville, Ala. The Utah complaint alleges that New York-based JetBlue violated a privacy policy posted on its Web site.
TOPIC
By Jodi Shaefer | December 31, 2000
A RECENT STUDY by the Pew Internet & American Life Project reports that more than 5 1/2 million people seek health and medical information from the Internet's 17,000 health-related sites each day. That is more than shop online. They seek health information for both themselves (43 percent) and others (54 percent). They choose the Internet because it is convenient and anonymous, and offers a vast array of information. However, getting health information from the Internet raises concerns about confidentiality, the reliability of the information and the risks of misunderstanding or undue alarm.
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | July 4, 2013
Maryland joined 22 other states this week in sending a letter to Google saying more needs to be done to protect consumers' privacy. Thirty-six attorneys general wrote to Google more than a year ago about privacy concerns. Maryland AG Doug Gansler said Wednesday Google officials met with the state regulators and made some changes, “but there is still much more to do and we plan to keep up the pressure.” Now a new letter has been sent to CEO Larry Page, making further suggestions to improve customers' privacy.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2012
Online privacy issues jumped to the forefront Wednesday in Maryland as the attorney general challenged Google Inc.'s new privacy policy, a few days after a pair of Baltimore attorneys filed a class-action lawsuit against Facebook Inc. for allegedly tracking users who ventured off its online social network. Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler sent a letter to Google that demanded a meeting in a week about the company's changes to its privacy policy, which gives the Internet company deeper access to users' data across its services, such as Gmail and YouTube.
NEWS
March 3, 2011
BmoreShopping.com strives to offer its visitors the many advantages of Internet technology and to provide an interactive and personalized experience. This policy covers how we treat personally identifiable information and other information that we collect, store, and receive, including information related to your use of our products and services. Personally identifiable information is information about you that is personally identifiable, such as your name, address, email address, or phone number, and that is not otherwise publicly available.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | September 24, 2003
JetBlue Airways Corp., a low-fare carrier whose sales nearly doubled last year, was sued yesterday by customers for disclosing passenger information to a Defense Department contractor. Two lawsuits, filed in a state court in Salt Lake City and federal court in Los Angeles, seek class action status to represent passengers whose names, addresses, phone numbers and flight itineraries were disclosed to Torch Concepts of Huntsville, Ala. The Utah complaint alleges that New York-based JetBlue violated a privacy policy posted on its Web site.
TOPIC
By Jodi Shaefer | December 31, 2000
A RECENT STUDY by the Pew Internet & American Life Project reports that more than 5 1/2 million people seek health and medical information from the Internet's 17,000 health-related sites each day. That is more than shop online. They seek health information for both themselves (43 percent) and others (54 percent). They choose the Internet because it is convenient and anonymous, and offers a vast array of information. However, getting health information from the Internet raises concerns about confidentiality, the reliability of the information and the risks of misunderstanding or undue alarm.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Reid Kanaley and Reid Kanaley,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 23, 2000
If you assume your personal data are safe at a Web site with a fancy "privacy policy," then, privacy experts say, one thing about you is already exposed: You're gullible. "Privacy policies are not worth the pixels they're printed on," said Fred Davis, a privacy advocate whose California company, Lumeria Inc., is among many new firms offering services to shield computer users from online snoops. Many Web businesses have hoped that privacy policies - voluntary statements listing how their sites intend to use the information they collect about visitors - would prove that self-regulation, rather than government intervention, can ensure the safety of personal data online.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose and Eileen Ambrose,SUN STAFF | October 26, 1999
As Congress gets ready to vote on overhauling Depression-era banking laws, consumer advocates warn that the new rules would lead to higher fees and privacy invasions."
EXPLORE
March 23, 2011
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EXPLORE
March 23, 2011
About Us Advertise Privacy Policy Terms of Service Subscribe Contact Us
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