Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPrivacy Law
IN THE NEWS

Privacy Law

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By JANE BRYANT QUINN and JANE BRYANT QUINN,Washington Post Writers Group | May 20, 2001
YOU'RE starting to see the results of the so-called "financial privacy" law, passed in 1999 and taking effect July 1. Banks, credit unions, insurance companies and brokerage houses, among others, are mailing out hundreds of millions of privacy notices. Under the new law, consumers can - in a very few circumstances - block financial institutions from disclosing their personal account information. It's called an "opt-out" right. If you opt out, you might (might!) get fewer solicitations for financial products.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jon S. Cardin | November 20, 2013
In 2010, When Annmarie Chiarini's ex-boyfriend posted 88 naked pictures of her on a website designed to shame, humiliate and destroy lives, she went straight to the police. Certain her ex committed a crime, she was shocked when the officers smirked sheepishly at the thought of this young woman's naked pictures on the Internet while informing her no law had been broken. Meanwhile, Ms. Chiarini's job at a local college, her reputation as a responsible, upstanding citizen, her relationships with her children, family and friends and her mental stability hung precariously in the balance.
Advertisement
NEWS
By David Etue | February 2, 2007
Computer hackers got the best of T. J. Maxx, Marshalls and other chain stores owned by TJX Cos. when they stole the personal data of hundreds of thousands of customers. The theft, disclosed by the company last month, led to fraudulent purchases across the country and as far away as Hong Kong and Sweden. It was the latest publicized high-stakes heist of credit card information, Social Security numbers and other data. But it surely won't be the last. Identity theft is a real and growing problem.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis and Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2013
Marylanders who signed up for coverage through the state's new health insurance exchange did so under the condition that their information could be shared with law enforcement. The policy sparked debate in the conservative blogosphere after the Weekly Standard published a post saying it raised privacy concerns. "We will not sell your information to others. Any information that you provide to us in your application will be used only to carry out the functions of Maryland Health Connection," the policy states.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis and Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2013
Marylanders who signed up for coverage through the state's new health insurance exchange did so under the condition that their information could be shared with law enforcement. The policy sparked debate in the conservative blogosphere after the Weekly Standard published a post saying it raised privacy concerns. "We will not sell your information to others. Any information that you provide to us in your application will be used only to carry out the functions of Maryland Health Connection," the policy states.
TOPIC
By Sarah Kellogg | June 27, 1999
WASHINGTON -- If you want to keep a secret, it's best not to tell it in your doctor's office.Medical records routinely end up in the hands of insurance companies, employers, police officers, researchers and drug firms. It's easier to protect the titles of last weekend's video rentals than your test results.That's because Congress has protected the right to privacy when it comes to video rentals. No federal law protects the confidentiality of personal medical information.But Congress is hoping to change that.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | April 24, 1998
A decade ago, intimate medical secrets were likely to remain safely locked in a doctor's file cabinet.Today, data banks and the Internet help deliver those details to public health departments, managed care groups, labs, pharmacies and even employers, with little or no regulation."
NEWS
By Jon S. Cardin | November 20, 2013
In 2010, When Annmarie Chiarini's ex-boyfriend posted 88 naked pictures of her on a website designed to shame, humiliate and destroy lives, she went straight to the police. Certain her ex committed a crime, she was shocked when the officers smirked sheepishly at the thought of this young woman's naked pictures on the Internet while informing her no law had been broken. Meanwhile, Ms. Chiarini's job at a local college, her reputation as a responsible, upstanding citizen, her relationships with her children, family and friends and her mental stability hung precariously in the balance.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | December 31, 2012
Here's a recipe for systematically fact-checking the accuracy of speed camera tickets, at least in Baltimore City where the time stamps on citation photos go to the thousandth of a second: Take a random sample of tickets. Use the two time-stamped photos on each one to physically measure the distance traveled so as to calculate the vehicle's actual speed. Then compare that to the alleged speed listed on the ticket. Repeat. The Sun has employed this method to document erroneous readings at seven city speed cameras.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Frank D. Roylance and Gadi Dechter and Frank D. Roylance,SUN REPORTERS | April 19, 2007
Even with early warning signs and multiple campus interventions - as in the case of Virginia Tech gunman Cho Seung-Hui - a university's options for dealing with mentally ill students are limited by privacy laws and medical ethics. Despite two encounters with campus police in 2005 after harassment complaints by female students, and a brief commitment at a psychiatric hospital because of fears that he was suicidal, Cho remained a Hokie in good standing even as he plotted the massacre of 32 students and faculty Monday in Blacksburg, Va., authorities said yesterday.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | December 31, 2012
Here's a recipe for systematically fact-checking the accuracy of speed camera tickets, at least in Baltimore City where the time stamps on citation photos go to the thousandth of a second: Take a random sample of tickets. Use the two time-stamped photos on each one to physically measure the distance traveled so as to calculate the vehicle's actual speed. Then compare that to the alleged speed listed on the ticket. Repeat. The Sun has employed this method to document erroneous readings at seven city speed cameras.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Frank D. Roylance and Gadi Dechter and Frank D. Roylance,SUN REPORTERS | April 19, 2007
Even with early warning signs and multiple campus interventions - as in the case of Virginia Tech gunman Cho Seung-Hui - a university's options for dealing with mentally ill students are limited by privacy laws and medical ethics. Despite two encounters with campus police in 2005 after harassment complaints by female students, and a brief commitment at a psychiatric hospital because of fears that he was suicidal, Cho remained a Hokie in good standing even as he plotted the massacre of 32 students and faculty Monday in Blacksburg, Va., authorities said yesterday.
NEWS
By David Etue | February 2, 2007
Computer hackers got the best of T. J. Maxx, Marshalls and other chain stores owned by TJX Cos. when they stole the personal data of hundreds of thousands of customers. The theft, disclosed by the company last month, led to fraudulent purchases across the country and as far away as Hong Kong and Sweden. It was the latest publicized high-stakes heist of credit card information, Social Security numbers and other data. But it surely won't be the last. Identity theft is a real and growing problem.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | May 5, 2003
Allen Tien needed secure computers. The elderly patients in his company's research program had to fill out confidential surveys, and he wanted to keep them confidential. So the Towson medical software consultant turned to biometrics -- the science that identifies people by turning their physical characteristics into a unique set of numbers. He hooked a set of fingerprint scanners to his office PCs, figuring they'd provide a foolproof way for each patient to sign on. And then he learned something -- a lot of senior citizens don't leave usable prints because their fingertips are worn down.
BUSINESS
By JANE BRYANT QUINN and JANE BRYANT QUINN,Washington Post Writers Group | May 20, 2001
YOU'RE starting to see the results of the so-called "financial privacy" law, passed in 1999 and taking effect July 1. Banks, credit unions, insurance companies and brokerage houses, among others, are mailing out hundreds of millions of privacy notices. Under the new law, consumers can - in a very few circumstances - block financial institutions from disclosing their personal account information. It's called an "opt-out" right. If you opt out, you might (might!) get fewer solicitations for financial products.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | April 24, 2001
The call came when the 18-year-old was at work at an Elkridge pizza shop: Her 22-year-old housemate, a flight attendant, had discovered a secret video recording setup that played images of the younger woman's bathroom in the house where they rented rooms. Police, armed with search warrants, later found four tiny cameras hidden behind paneling and in towel racks in the women's bedrooms and bathrooms. Investigators also found tapes that showed both women taking showers, going to the bathroom and dressing, according to court documents.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | October 25, 2000
Maryland's insurance commissioner told a legislative committee yesterday that he will seek legislation allowing him to issue new regulations on privacy of patient records, to comply with federal legislation passed last year. Steven B. Larsen, the commissioner, testified at a hearing on patient privacy issues conducted by the legislative Joint Committee on Federal Relations. Larsen said the federal law last year that allowed combinations of banks, securities dealers and insurers included new privacy provisions.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | June 9, 1997
William Warner had no idea his prostate condition was public information.But three years after his prostate surgery at Union Memorial Hospital in Baltimore, a physician he had never met tapped into the hospital computer, gathered details about the 1993 procedure and used them at a pretrial hearing."
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | October 25, 2000
Maryland's insurance commissioner told a legislative committee yesterday that he will seek legislation allowing him to issue new regulations on privacy of patient records, to comply with federal legislation passed last year. Steven B. Larsen, the commissioner, testified at a hearing on patient privacy issues conducted by the legislative Joint Committee on Federal Relations. Larsen said the federal law last year that allowed combinations of banks, securities dealers and insurers included new privacy provisions.
TOPIC
By Sarah Kellogg | June 27, 1999
WASHINGTON -- If you want to keep a secret, it's best not to tell it in your doctor's office.Medical records routinely end up in the hands of insurance companies, employers, police officers, researchers and drug firms. It's easier to protect the titles of last weekend's video rentals than your test results.That's because Congress has protected the right to privacy when it comes to video rentals. No federal law protects the confidentiality of personal medical information.But Congress is hoping to change that.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.