Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPrivacy
IN THE NEWS

Privacy

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By BARBARA MALLONEE | October 25, 1994
The last rose of summer is spent by September, and wildflowers shortly thereafter. Stems turn to stalks alongside state highways and in the many median strips now left to run wild.For long stretches, land that parts the traffic rolls toward the horizon like ribbons of prairie. Chicory, a haze of blue dust at a distance, bobs beside a speeding car as though scraps of sky had caught in a whistle of air. Deeper in the median meadows grow thistles, clover, goldenrod. Were a traveler to pull over to pick a last autumn armful of flowers, the plants would pale as soon as their stems were cut.In fact, travelers do not pull onto the median strips.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Marie Marciano Gullard and For The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
What does it take to win the National Association of Home Builders' 2010 Best in American Living Awards? In the case of one particular winning home - a coastal Maryland mansion - it takes an owner with a vision and an equally qualified design visionary to make the dream a reality. Off a narrow lane on Ocean City's Assawoman Bay, Bill and Shelby Allen's three-story home sits regally at the water's edge in defiance of all elements, both natural and architectural. “I wanted a Northern Atlantic, Nantucket-style cottage - coastal [and]
Advertisement
NEWS
August 16, 2012
In February, President Obama signed a bill requiring the Federal Aviation Administration to accommodate unmanned aerial vehicles in America's civilian airspace. The legislation slipped through without much media notice and certainly with no input from the American people. I'm glad aerospace manufacturers in Maryland will profit from this emerging new technology, but when I think of 10,000 or more drones soon to be in the air I'm troubled ("Md. sees a future in the rise of unmanned aircraft," Aug. 14)
NEWS
By David Horsey | September 9, 2014
With my job as a cartoonist and columnist for one the nation's biggest newspapers comes a modicum of minor celebrity, but I can't imagine a big market for naked pictures of myself. This is not the case for true celebrities, such as Jennifer Lawrence, Kate Upton, Kirsten Dunst, Kim Kardashian and Rihanna, who, along with as many as 100 others, had private nude photos of themselves stolen from Apple's iCloud storage system and posted for public perusal online. Whether the hackers who did this were out to make money or simply to prove their technological prowess, they caught the attention of the FBI, which is now investigating.
NEWS
September 15, 2011
The picture in Wednesday's Sun ("Election draws lowest turnout in history," Sept. 14) illustrates my huge complaint and frustration about the lack of privacy while voting. If the machines were placed with the screens facing the wall instead of open to the public, our votes wouldn't be visible to anyone behind us. I don't accept any excuse. The Board of Election Supervisors has a duty to see that the screens are private and are wired so that each machine is shielded. Claudia R. Fielding
NEWS
July 1, 2013
If Edward Snowden "faced the consequences" of his actions, he would spend the rest of his life in isolated torture or even be executed ("Edward Snowden's 'Amazing Race,'" June 28). It's no wonder he prefers a life on the run. Some call him a traitor; others praise him as one of the greatest American heroes since Paul Revere. Perhaps Mr. Snowden decried the leaking of classified secrets years ago, yet when this NSA contract employee discovered the extent of the government's spying and data collecting, he took it upon himself to blow the whistle.
NEWS
By Kathleen Parker | February 4, 2010
My favorite thing about J.D. Salinger wasn't his seminal work -- or his most famous character, Holden Caulfield -- but how little I knew of him, thanks to his relentless pursuit of privacy. It's the same thing I also love about two other favorite writers, Harper Lee and Florence King. The former, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of "To Kill a Mockingbird," has declined most interview requests since the 1960 publication of the novel. Her recorded public ventures have included judging an annual high school essay-writing contest.
NEWS
March 28, 2012
I see you have another article about employers looking at people's pages on Facebook. But the solution is obvious. Don't waste your time on Facebook, and you don't have to worry about people looking at it. Problem solved. You're welcome. William Smith, Baltimore
NEWS
By Alexander E. Hooke | August 28, 2013
"Can we say then … that the general economy of power in our societies is becoming a domain of security?" Michel Foucault, 1978 In 1791, the Fourth Amendment - sanctifying what we now call the human right to privacy - became part of the Bill of Rights. Barely had the ink of the signatures dried when it was already threatened by government. Congress immediately planned to take a census of the newly established country's population, only to be met by numerous citizens resisting officials poking their heads onto their property and asking about their children, size of home, how many males and females were over the age of 16. More than two centuries later, the right to privacy continues to be threatened and violated.
NEWS
June 3, 2013
A Defense Science Board report made public last week contained shocking allegations about the extent of Chinese military hacking of American defense technologies. Though China's government denies it - huffily insisting that it has no need for American military technology - the report disclosed that Chinese cyberattacks had yielded data from dozens of weapons systems, including missile defenses and the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter. That comes on top of reports that Chinese hackers had successfully infiltrated the computer systems of a wide variety of U.S. corporations, think tanks and media outlets.
NEWS
September 2, 2014
Gary Sullivan's commentary defending the actions of the National Security Agency is full of faulty arguments ( "Too much of a good thing," Aug. 27). First of all, the Fourth Amendment is the law and was established at the time of this country's founding. No one needs to "get out and vote" in order to be protected by it from government spying. In any case, the NSA's policies were kept secret so no one could have voted to support or oppose them in the first place. To those who are concerned about the NSA violating their privacy, Mr. Sullivan offers nothing more than the empty, self-serving claim that the NSA is too busy saving our lives to do so. The NSA is a massive organization staffed by human beings.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2014
Law enforcement agencies in the Baltimore area and across the country are researching drones, intrigued by their potential for high-risk tactical raids and gathering intelligence. But uncertainty over federal regulations, concern about privacy issues and other factors have slowed many agencies from acquiring the unmanned aircraft. "There are still many unanswered questions into the future of drone use and how the [Federal Aviation Administration] will regulate those efforts," said Harford County sheriff's office spokeswoman Cristie Kahler.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2014
Prosecutors had no eyewitness tying Eric Jordan to a pair of armed robberies at Baltimore fast-food restaurants. But they didn't need one to win a conviction — radio waves darting from his cellphone had silently betrayed him. A few paragraphs tapped out from a prosecutor's office and the flick of a judge's pen were all investigators needed to get the phone records. That turned Jordan's Sanyo phone into a weapon against him, calling into question his assertion that he hadn't acted as a getaway driver for Aaron Graham.
NEWS
By Joseph Ganem | August 14, 2014
In the switch to "smart meters," BGE is inconveniencing its customers for something they probably don't even want and is somewhat suspect, anyway: Just imagine the information BGE will be able to glean from real-time utility usage data available with smart meters. It will likely be possible for the company to not only deduce the number of people living in your house, but also when they go to work, return home, eat, watch TV, go to bed and so on, because all of these activities involve turning on and off appliances of various kinds and using more or less electricity.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2014
Big Brother is watching you — through your smart meter? One complaint about the technology, as electric and gas utilities roll it out here and across the country, is that it offers another way for government agencies — or hackers — to snoop on us. The American Civil Liberties Union notes that at least some utilities have turned over customer data after legal demands. San Diego Gas & Electric, required by California regulators to report annually on privacy issues, said it disclosed 3,056 customers' records last year, some of which could have included "energy usage data of varying granularities.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2014
About one in five cars on American roadways connects to outside parties via cellular telephone networks, transmitting data on drivers' speeding and braking habits, their location, and their vehicle's health and performance. By 2025, AAA predicts, all new cars will. Computers on board most vehicles on the road already collect and monitor such data, which can be downloaded at dealerships for repair purposes and shared with manufacturers, who say it's used to make cars safer and more reliable.
NEWS
April 28, 2012
The criminal defense lawyers make the fair and typical plea for the "right to privacy" on behalf of the violent suspects they represent, but they ignore that the victim of a crime, be it an individual, a store or whatever, has not only lost their privacy but considerably more in the process ("Maryland police continue to collect DNA samples," April 26). There are consequences to bad behavior and if giving up your DNA is one of them, so be it. Peter Bell, Monkton
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2014
The Army is planning to launch a pair of blimps over Maryland this fall to watch the Eastern Seaboard for incoming cruise missiles. It's what else they might be able to see from up there that worries privacy advocates. The Army says the aerostats — blimps that will be tethered to the ground in Harford and Baltimore counties — will carry technology capable of detecting, tracking and targeting cruise missiles and rockets up to 340 miles away. That means they can cover an area from North Carolina to the Canadian border.
NEWS
By John Fritze and Catherine Rentz, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2014
When Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown's gubernatorial campaign wanted to make sure that likely primary voters saw a video ad, his staff didn't rely solely on television stations to deliver the message. They also arranged for it to run on the computer screens of individuals the campaign believes are all but certain to turn out at the polls. And when volunteers for Attorney General Douglas Gansler's campaign walk through a neighborhood to meet with voters, they visit homes identified by computer modeling that predicts - before the doorbell is rung - how strong a supporter the person on the other side of the threshold might be. The Democrats and Republicans running in Maryland's June 24 gubernatorial primary are embracing increasingly sophisticated digital targeting techniques that allow candidates to single out voters and aim specialized ads - as well as personal contacts - directly at them.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.