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NEWS
By Clarence Page | March 1, 2001
WASHINGTON -- Here's a not-so-trivial trivia question for you: Under which president did the most Americans go to prison for serious crimes: Ronald Reagan, Bill Clinton or the first George Bush? Here's a hint: He likes to give out lots of pardons. Yes, a study released last week by the Washington-based Justice Policy Institute (JPI) found that Bill "You Beg My Pardon" Clinton wins this dubious distinction. Some 673,000 inmates were added to state and federal prisons and jails under Mr. Clinton's two terms, the institute found, compared to 343,000 during Mr. Bush's term and 448,000 during Mr. Reagan's two terms.
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NEWS
By Russell Baker | May 28, 1991
MAYBE the most exciting play on Broadway just now is about a nation obsessed with locking people up and throwing away the key. It opens with a lashing: 50 strokes across a bare back. At first we seem to be in one of the deeper pits of hell, and metaphorically speaking, that is indeed the setting for the entire play, "Our Country's Good."The country of this bitterly ironic title is not modern America, but the England that has just lost its American colonies and, with them, a conveniently remote continent to provide a cheap solution to its prison problem.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | November 18, 2004
With a public apology from the governor, the state agreed yesterday to pay Michael Austin $1.4 million for the 27 years he spent in prison for a murder he did not commit. Along with the payments, which will be spread out over 10 years, the Board of Public Works approved money for Austin to seek financial counseling. The award was the largest the state has ever made to an exonerated prisoner. "This board has been asked under the state finance and procurement act to value days, to value time spent behind bars for no reason, for inappropriate reasons, for unlawful reasons," Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. told Austin.
FEATURES
By Patrick A. McGuire | July 5, 1992
One day last summer at the Maryland House of Correction in Jessup, a prisoner named Dennis Wise took a seat at the back of the tiny cubicle where I hold forth each week as a volunteer writing instructor. It's a loosely structured class and it isn't unusual that prisoners wander in for a session or two and then drift away. While always a possibility that such drifting is a commentary on the quality of the instruction, it is also true that writing is a painful business. The core of regulars who turn out every week come not because they want to, or because someone else wants them to, but because, in the true writer's motivation, they simply have to. Buried inside is something terrible, something wonderful, something that absolutely must come out. All their lives they have tried either to unlock long-imprisoned feelings or to escape them; that they have failed is as evident as their bleak existence in this ancient, decaying prison, far removed from the commerce of the normal world.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | August 30, 1991
TALLADEGA, Ala. -- For the first time in nine days, the 148detainees, hostages and inmates at the Talladega federal prison ate a full meal yesterday morning, and doctors examined all nine remaining hostages and several detainees.Warden Roger Scott said that each person inside the prison's maximum security Alpha dorm had hamburger, rice, beans, bread and coffee.He said the Cuban detainees had not asked for food until yesterday. After the meal, prison doctors treated at least one detainee suffering from diabetes and the nine hostages.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Evening Sun Staff | April 10, 1991
Against all odds, Sharon Gross, inmate No. 906-697, found joy in the birth of her son Hakeem.Gross, a 30-year-old Baltimore woman serving four years for cocaine possession, struggled through 19 hours of labor in shackles and handcuffs. The restraints came off only when she was ready to deliver.No friend or relative was allowed in the hospital to hold her hand and there were no little gifts for Gross after her ordeal -- prison rules prevented her from bringing anything back to jail.Finally, only 36 hours after giving birth, Gross went home -- to the Maryland Correctional Institution for Women in Jessup.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 23, 2003
A 26-year-old inmate at the Maryland House of Correction was flown to Maryland Shock Trauma Center late Tuesday after a stabbing in a fight that injured his chest and neck, prison officials said. The fight at 8:45 p.m. in a prison dormitory caused a partial lockdown of the maximum-security prison, said Capt. Priscilla Doggett, a spokeswoman for the Division of Correction. The man, whose name was not released pending notification of family, is serving a 14-year sentence, Doggett said.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,Sun Staff Writer | October 5, 1994
Neighbors of the Patuxent Institution in Jessup say they are relieved by changes made at the maximum-security prison after an inmate's escape two months ago.But many residents -- as well as Del. Virginia M. Thomas, who toured the institution Monday -- say they hope more can be done to increase security at the prison.Among the changes made by prison officials are installing a $52,000 razor wire fence and clarifying the use of sirens to alert residents to future escapes, according to Leonard A. Sipes Jr., spokesman for the state Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,Staff Writer | December 17, 1992
Seven inmates at the Eastern Correctional Institution were placed in isolation yesterday, as investigators launched a probe into alleged financial improprieties at the Somerset County prison commissary, correction officials confirmed.A prison source said investigators also planned to question correctional officers at the institution about apparent thefts of goods and money from the commissary operation, but a spokesman for the Division of Correction said he had no knowledge of that aspect of the probe.
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