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NEWS
May 27, 1993
Seven years into his job as Maryland's public safety secretary, Bishop L. Robinson has reversed course: he's now a fan of alternatives to the state's costly prison expansion plan. He says he would like to see 30 percent of the state's inmates dealt with through non-incarceration.We applaud Mr. Robinson's turnaround. It makes no sense to build a seemingly endless chain of large new prisons. The expense to taxpayers is enormous and the results are counter-productive: prisons don't stop criminals from returning to their former lifestyles once they are released.
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NEWS
March 14, 2007
Despite some progress, Maryland's mandatory minimum sentences are still too harsh, particularly on African-American defendants, and they don't allow enough low-level drug offenders to get treatment, which would be more helpful to them and to the public, according to a recent policy study. Legislation pending in the General Assembly would help address these concerns and deserves to be passed. Like many states, Maryland has relied on firm, fixed punishments as an effective way to fight crime.
SPORTS
By Dan Rodricks and Dan Rodricks,SUN STAFF | November 6, 2001
EDGEFIELD, S.C. - This is where the long, hard fall of Reggie Gross ends - in a two-man cell deep inside a maximum security prison on the piney outskirts of Strom Thurmond's rural hometown. He hasn't had a visitor in seven years. He hasn't seen his daughters in 12. Parole is a distant cloud. "As it all shakes out," predicted one of the men who prosecuted Gross, "he'll die in prison." Once upon a time, Reggie Gross was a promising heavyweight fighter from Baltimore - the last one to make headlines before the emergence of Hasim "The Rock" Rahman on the international boxing scene.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | March 1, 2001
WASHINGTON -- Here's a not-so-trivial trivia question for you: Under which president did the most Americans go to prison for serious crimes: Ronald Reagan, Bill Clinton or the first George Bush? Here's a hint: He likes to give out lots of pardons. Yes, a study released last week by the Washington-based Justice Policy Institute (JPI) found that Bill "You Beg My Pardon" Clinton wins this dubious distinction. Some 673,000 inmates were added to state and federal prisons and jails under Mr. Clinton's two terms, the institute found, compared to 343,000 during Mr. Bush's term and 448,000 during Mr. Reagan's two terms.
NEWS
By Russell Baker | May 28, 1991
MAYBE the most exciting play on Broadway just now is about a nation obsessed with locking people up and throwing away the key. It opens with a lashing: 50 strokes across a bare back. At first we seem to be in one of the deeper pits of hell, and metaphorically speaking, that is indeed the setting for the entire play, "Our Country's Good."The country of this bitterly ironic title is not modern America, but the England that has just lost its American colonies and, with them, a conveniently remote continent to provide a cheap solution to its prison problem.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | November 18, 2004
With a public apology from the governor, the state agreed yesterday to pay Michael Austin $1.4 million for the 27 years he spent in prison for a murder he did not commit. Along with the payments, which will be spread out over 10 years, the Board of Public Works approved money for Austin to seek financial counseling. The award was the largest the state has ever made to an exonerated prisoner. "This board has been asked under the state finance and procurement act to value days, to value time spent behind bars for no reason, for inappropriate reasons, for unlawful reasons," Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. told Austin.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,Sun Staff Writer | July 27, 1994
After decades of brushing against the law as one of the city's most frequent violators of the housing code, longtime Baltimore landlord Morris Garbis, at the age of 78, was sentenced to prison for the first time yesterday.Garbis -- who was described as a "slumlord" in headlines as much as 30 years ago and is still said to owe the city thousands of dollars in fines -- was ordered to serve a year in prison for brokering real estate without a license. In several instances cited by prosecutor Gary Honick, Garbis kept money for down payments on sales that were never completed.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,sun reporter | December 7, 2006
A prisoner who eviscerated another inmate at a state prison in Jessup and called it self-defense was convicted of first-degree murder yesterday by an Anne Arundel County jury. Jurors deliberated 14 hours over three days before finding Kenneth Lawrence Higgins, 37, guilty of the January 2005 fatal stabbing of Brian Wilson, 21. The verdict ended a week-long trial that portrayed the Maryland House of Correction Annex as a war zone where inmates say they kill so they are not killed. The verdict was an important win for prosecutors, who have seen prison cases collapse amid numerous problems.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 23, 2003
A 26-year-old inmate at the Maryland House of Correction was flown to Maryland Shock Trauma Center late Tuesday after a stabbing in a fight that injured his chest and neck, prison officials said. The fight at 8:45 p.m. in a prison dormitory caused a partial lockdown of the maximum-security prison, said Capt. Priscilla Doggett, a spokeswoman for the Division of Correction. The man, whose name was not released pending notification of family, is serving a 14-year sentence, Doggett said.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,Sun Staff Writer | October 5, 1994
Neighbors of the Patuxent Institution in Jessup say they are relieved by changes made at the maximum-security prison after an inmate's escape two months ago.But many residents -- as well as Del. Virginia M. Thomas, who toured the institution Monday -- say they hope more can be done to increase security at the prison.Among the changes made by prison officials are installing a $52,000 razor wire fence and clarifying the use of sirens to alert residents to future escapes, according to Leonard A. Sipes Jr., spokesman for the state Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services.
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