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Prison Term

NEWS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2011
The last of three white men accused of attacking a black fisherman in 2009 was given an 85-year prison sentence Wednesday, with all but 10 years suspended. Zachary D. Watson, 19, averted a trial by pleading guilty to four charges — armed carjacking, robbery with a deadly weapon, conspiracy to commit assault and committing a hate crime — with the understanding that he would receive a limited term of incarceration. But Baltimore Circuit Judge Lynn K. Stewart sternly warned Watson that she would make sure he serves the remaining 75 years of the sentence if he commits any offenses during a five-year probationary period after his release.
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NEWS
March 14, 2012
Those who are sworn to enforce the law have a special obligation to obey it. That should be the cardinal rule for any police department, and the prison sentence handed down this week for a Baltimore officer who took kickbacks from a Rosedale body shop should help make sure his colleagues on the force get the message. Officer David Reeping was sentenced to eight months in federal prison Tuesday after he confessed to participating in an extortion scheme in which he and other officers received thousands of dollars in payments for illegally referring accident victims to a towing company that was not authorized to do business with the city.
BUSINESS
By Patricia Hurtado and Patricia Hurtado,NEWSDAY | September 16, 2004
NEW YORK - Speaking in a light-bathed room where her media company holds meetings and photo shoots, Martha Stewart said yesterday that she would voluntarily begin serving her five-month prison term because she wanted to put the "nightmare" of her stock scandal behind her. "I suppose the best word to use for this very harsh and difficult decision is finality," Stewart, 63, told reporters gathered for a news conference at the Chelsea offices of the company...
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2011
Donnie Andrews' life is one that David Simon and Ed Burns would have had to invent if he hadn't already lived it. "I am the real Omar," Andrews tells me by way of introduction, referring to how he was the inspiration for the ruthless yet moral stickup man in the Simon and Burns HBO series "The Wire. " Omar Little didn't make it through "The Wire's" five-season arc. He was shot to death in the final season — as was a member of his crew, Donnie, who was played by Andrews himself in a bit part.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop | June 4, 2012
A West Baltimore man captured on video attacking a police officer on New Year's Eve was convicted of second-degree assault last month in a rare bit of swift justice in the city. Manuel Imel, 40, was sentenced to 10 years in prison, with all but one year of the term suspended, for tackling an officer who was in the middle of arresting a second man. A recording of the incident was widely viewed online at WorldStarHipHop.com. It shows two officers trying to handcuff a man in the street as a crowd watches, apparently upset.
NEWS
June 11, 2003
An Anne Arundel County judge who four years ago shortened the 15-year prison term of a man who had sexually assaulted two girls, ages 5 and 9, ordered the man this week to serve the remaining years of the prison term. Karl L. Johnson, 25, of Severna Park pleaded guilty Monday to violating his probation, according to court records. He was convicted this year in District Court in connection with two domestic cases, a spokeswoman for the state's attorney's office said. Prosecutors criticized Circuit Judge Ronald A. Silkworth in 1999 for releasing Johnson early from prison, where he was serving seven years of a 15-year sentence for rape and battery, and placing him on home detention.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2011
A former social services employee in Baltimore was sentenced to five years in prison Tuesday for stealing nearly $417,000 in welfare funds over a 14-month period, the Maryland Attorney General's Office announced. Joyce Renay Flowers, 41, was also ordered to pay more than $374,000 in restitution and could later be made to serve a suspended prison term of 20 years if she violates probation after her release. According to prosecutors, Flowers created 17 fake welfare recipients within the Baltimore Department of Social Services computer system, then stole thousands of dollars in cash and food stamps from August 2008 through mid-October 2009, trading the funds for laptops, televisions, furniture, appliances, cruise vacations, a BMW X5 and jewelry.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2012
Perry Roark, the co-founder and "supreme commander" of notorious prison gang Dead Man Inc., pleaded guilty to federal racketeering and related murder and drug charges this week, accepting a life sentence as part of the deal. Some of the charges would have made him eligible for the death penalty. The 43-year-old, who was rearraigned in U.S. District Court in Baltimore during an unpublicized hearing Thursday, has been incarcerated since he came of age. State prison is what he knows and where he built DMI into a militarized group of organized killers and enforcers who trade lives for heroin, a gang expert said.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2011
Roan S. Faulkner, a Pentecostal bishop who pleaded guilty to sexually assaulting a parishioner after she had come to him for advice on a family matter, was given a suspended 18-month prison sentence Wednesday in Baltimore County Circuit Court. During the investigation into his conduct with the 43-year-old parishioner, three other women associated with Faulkner's New Life Pentecostal Ministries in Catonsville told authorities that the bishop had made physical advances toward them, although none of those acts rose to the level of the attack on the parishioner, whom he forced to perform a sexual act and tried to rape, according to prosecutors.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2012
An attorney for former Anne Arundel County Councilman Daryl D. Jones has appealed a judge's recent ruling, in an attempt to regain his seat when he finishes serving time in federal prison later this year. A county Circuit Court judge ruled last month that Jones, who began serving a five-month federal prison term in January for failing to file income taxes, was required to live in his district during the full duration of his term in office. The County Council removed Jones, a Severn Democrat, from the council, arguing that although he had a permanent home in his district, he violated the county charter when he left to serve the prison term.
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