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Prison Term

NEWS
By Tricia Bishop | June 4, 2012
A West Baltimore man captured on video attacking a police officer on New Year's Eve was convicted of second-degree assault last month in a rare bit of swift justice in the city. Manuel Imel, 40, was sentenced to 10 years in prison, with all but one year of the term suspended, for tackling an officer who was in the middle of arresting a second man. A recording of the incident was widely viewed online at WorldStarHipHop.com. It shows two officers trying to handcuff a man in the street as a crowd watches, apparently upset.
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NEWS
June 11, 2003
An Anne Arundel County judge who four years ago shortened the 15-year prison term of a man who had sexually assaulted two girls, ages 5 and 9, ordered the man this week to serve the remaining years of the prison term. Karl L. Johnson, 25, of Severna Park pleaded guilty Monday to violating his probation, according to court records. He was convicted this year in District Court in connection with two domestic cases, a spokeswoman for the state's attorney's office said. Prosecutors criticized Circuit Judge Ronald A. Silkworth in 1999 for releasing Johnson early from prison, where he was serving seven years of a 15-year sentence for rape and battery, and placing him on home detention.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2012
Robert Gene Harris was sentenced Friday to 10 and a half years in prison for his role in robberies in Maryland and Pennsylvania. Harris, 29, of Chambersburg, Pa., was sentenced by U.S. District Judge Benson E. Legg of the Maryland district court for conspiracy to commit armed robberies and the use of a firearm during a violent crime. The judge also ordered Harris to pay $14,925. Harris' prison term will be followed by three years of supervised release, according to U.S. Attorney for the District of Maryland Rod J. Rosenstein.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | February 27, 2012
An Annapolis woman pleaded guilty Friday to using false identities to bilk banks, Social Security and private and public insurers of $2.6 million, prosecutors said. From 2005 though 2009, Winnie Joanne Barefoot, 57, used stolen identities to take out loans on three properties in Annapolis, falsely representing her ability to repay the loans, according to a statement Friday from Maryland's U.S. Attorney's Office. Barefoot also admitted to providing false information to the Social Security Administration during that same period in order to receive disability benefits, which she has since repaid.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2012
A federal judge sentenced twin brothers to more than eight years in federal prison Monday for robbing $90,000 from a Landover Wachovia bank with help from a corrupt employee and others, the Maryland U.S. Attorney's Office announced. Darnell and Ronnell Davis, 26, of Severn and Washington, D.C., respectively, were also ordered to pay $118,000 in restitution and to forfeit a Dodge Challenger and Cadillac Escalade, each model year 2007. According to court records, the brothers and another man drove to the Wachovia on the 7700 block of Landover Road on Jan. 11. Two of the men entered the bank wearing masks and carrying guns and took a bag of cash from a bank employee, who was in on the job and heading to an ATM with the money.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2012
An attorney for former Anne Arundel County Councilman Daryl D. Jones has appealed a judge's recent ruling, in an attempt to regain his seat when he finishes serving time in federal prison later this year. A county Circuit Court judge ruled last month that Jones, who began serving a five-month federal prison term in January for failing to file income taxes, was required to live in his district during the full duration of his term in office. The County Council removed Jones, a Severn Democrat, from the council, arguing that although he had a permanent home in his district, he violated the county charter when he left to serve the prison term.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2014
A corrections officer at the Baltimore City Detention Center received a 30-month prison term Tuesday for her role in a wide-ranging drug smuggling plot hatched by members of the Black Guerrilla Family gang. Katrina Laprade, 32, pleaded guilty to a racketeering conspiracy charge in November and was sentenced the day before the anniversary of the initial indictment in the case being unsealed. Federal investigators found that inmates and the corrections officers worked together to smuggle drugs and cell phones into the downtown Baltimore jail.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | May 7, 1996
A former Taneytown man whose 1994 conviction and 145-year sentence on multiple child abuse charges were overturned last summer accepted a 40-year prison term yesterday rather than face a new trial.Carroll County Circuit Judge Luke K. Burns Jr. sentenced the man to 90 years in prison, then immediately suspended all but 40 years, in accordance with a plea arrangement.The name of the man, who is 30, is being withheld to protect the privacy of his victims.In August, the Maryland Court of Special Appeals overturned the man's July 1994 conviction and his prison term, one of the longest sentences for abuse imposed in Maryland.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan | November 29, 2007
Former state Sen. Thomas L. Bromwell Sr. will be allowed to start his seven-year prison term for bribery in July, so that his wife can serve a substantial portion of her prison sentence first, a federal judge ordered yesterday. The Bromwells requested the so-called staggered sentencing so that the Baltimore County Democrat could stay home with two of their youngest children while Mary Patricia Bromwell, 44, starts her prison term in January. Sentenced to a year and a day in prison for her role in a bribery scheme, the wife of the former state senator could receive two months off her sentence for "good time" credit and might be able to serve a portion of the remaining period in a halfway house, according to lawyers in the case.
NEWS
December 2, 1993
By halving the prison sentence of Pamela Snowhite Davis to one year, a three-judge panel has brought her sentence more in line with the gravity of her crime. She may not have received the vindication she craved, but the panel partially agreed with her contention that the original sentence handed down by county Circuit Court Judge Raymond E. Beck Sr. was overly harsh.When Judge Beck decreed that Davis serve two years in prison for her conviction for possessing less than an ounce of marijuana, for maintaining a common nuisance and for possession of drug paraphernalia, he was really punishing her for her strident advocacy to legalize marijuana.
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