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Prison Term

NEWS
March 14, 2012
Those who are sworn to enforce the law have a special obligation to obey it. That should be the cardinal rule for any police department, and the prison sentence handed down this week for a Baltimore officer who took kickbacks from a Rosedale body shop should help make sure his colleagues on the force get the message. Officer David Reeping was sentenced to eight months in federal prison Tuesday after he confessed to participating in an extortion scheme in which he and other officers received thousands of dollars in payments for illegally referring accident victims to a towing company that was not authorized to do business with the city.
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NEWS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2011
The last of three white men accused of attacking a black fisherman in 2009 was given an 85-year prison sentence Wednesday, with all but 10 years suspended. Zachary D. Watson, 19, averted a trial by pleading guilty to four charges — armed carjacking, robbery with a deadly weapon, conspiracy to commit assault and committing a hate crime — with the understanding that he would receive a limited term of incarceration. But Baltimore Circuit Judge Lynn K. Stewart sternly warned Watson that she would make sure he serves the remaining 75 years of the sentence if he commits any offenses during a five-year probationary period after his release.
BUSINESS
By Patricia Hurtado and Patricia Hurtado,NEWSDAY | September 16, 2004
NEW YORK - Speaking in a light-bathed room where her media company holds meetings and photo shoots, Martha Stewart said yesterday that she would voluntarily begin serving her five-month prison term because she wanted to put the "nightmare" of her stock scandal behind her. "I suppose the best word to use for this very harsh and difficult decision is finality," Stewart, 63, told reporters gathered for a news conference at the Chelsea offices of the company...
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2012
Perry Roark, the co-founder and "supreme commander" of notorious prison gang Dead Man Inc., pleaded guilty to federal racketeering and related murder and drug charges this week, accepting a life sentence as part of the deal. Some of the charges would have made him eligible for the death penalty. The 43-year-old, who was rearraigned in U.S. District Court in Baltimore during an unpublicized hearing Thursday, has been incarcerated since he came of age. State prison is what he knows and where he built DMI into a militarized group of organized killers and enforcers who trade lives for heroin, a gang expert said.
NEWS
June 11, 2003
An Anne Arundel County judge who four years ago shortened the 15-year prison term of a man who had sexually assaulted two girls, ages 5 and 9, ordered the man this week to serve the remaining years of the prison term. Karl L. Johnson, 25, of Severna Park pleaded guilty Monday to violating his probation, according to court records. He was convicted this year in District Court in connection with two domestic cases, a spokeswoman for the state's attorney's office said. Prosecutors criticized Circuit Judge Ronald A. Silkworth in 1999 for releasing Johnson early from prison, where he was serving seven years of a 15-year sentence for rape and battery, and placing him on home detention.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2011
Donnie Andrews' life is one that David Simon and Ed Burns would have had to invent if he hadn't already lived it. "I am the real Omar," Andrews tells me by way of introduction, referring to how he was the inspiration for the ruthless yet moral stickup man in the Simon and Burns HBO series "The Wire. " Omar Little didn't make it through "The Wire's" five-season arc. He was shot to death in the final season — as was a member of his crew, Donnie, who was played by Andrews himself in a bit part.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | February 27, 2012
An Annapolis woman pleaded guilty Friday to using false identities to bilk banks, Social Security and private and public insurers of $2.6 million, prosecutors said. From 2005 though 2009, Winnie Joanne Barefoot, 57, used stolen identities to take out loans on three properties in Annapolis, falsely representing her ability to repay the loans, according to a statement Friday from Maryland's U.S. Attorney's Office. Barefoot also admitted to providing false information to the Social Security Administration during that same period in order to receive disability benefits, which she has since repaid.
EXPLORE
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | September 4, 2012
A 28-year-old Harford County woman accused of causing a fatal accident near Bel Air in July 2011 has pleaded guilty to a single count of manslaughter by motor vehicle, the county state's attorney said, and will serve a prison term of five years. Nicole Ashley Albers entered the guilty plea in Harford County Circuit Court on Aug. 27, according to a news release issued last week by Harford County State's Attorney Joseph Cassilly. Police and prosecutors said Albers was under the influence of drugs when the vehicle she was driving crossed a double yellow center line on Route 543 and collided with another vehicle on July 21, 2011, killing a Bel Air woman who was a passenger in the vehicle Albers hit. Under a plea bargain between her lawyer and the state, Albers will receive the maximum 10-year sentence, with all but five years suspended, Cassilly's news release said.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2014
A corrections officer at the Baltimore City Detention Center received a 30-month prison term Tuesday for her role in a wide-ranging drug smuggling plot hatched by members of the Black Guerrilla Family gang. Katrina Laprade, 32, pleaded guilty to a racketeering conspiracy charge in November and was sentenced the day before the anniversary of the initial indictment in the case being unsealed. Federal investigators found that inmates and the corrections officers worked together to smuggle drugs and cell phones into the downtown Baltimore jail.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2013
A Glen Burnie man was sentenced Tuesday to life in prison for the first-degree murder of a man outside a bar in Glen Burnie, according to a spokeswoman for the Anne Arundel County prosecutors. Anne Arundel County Circuit Court Judge Ronald A. Silkworth ordered that Clayton A. Battle, 35, begin his sentence after he completes an eight-year prison term on a drug conviction. Battle pleaded guilty last February to fatally shooting Kelly T. Fisher, a 30-year-old Glen Burnie resident, outside Dietrich's Tavern on Dec. 4, 2010.
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