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NEWS
January 12, 2007
Critics derisively dismissed the initiative as "hug a thug," but the Ehrlich administration's prison reform effort has been primarily about public safety. It offers inmates education and skills to resist the one steady job awaiting them on the outside - selling drugs. The reforms have tried to put a stick in the revolving door of recidivism, and they shouldn't be discarded because there's a new man in the State House. Hiring a competent public safety secretary to manage the prisons should be only the first step.
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NEWS
January 12, 2007
Critics derisively dismissed the initiative as "hug a thug," but the Ehrlich administration's prison reform effort has been primarily about public safety. It offers inmates education and skills to resist the one steady job awaiting them on the outside - selling drugs. The reforms have tried to put a stick in the revolving door of recidivism, and they shouldn't be discarded because there's a new man in the State House. Hiring a competent public safety secretary to manage the prisons should be only the first step.
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NEWS
June 25, 2004
BLACK MEN IN America have a one-in-three chance of landing in prison in their lifetime. That chilling pronouncement and the fact that one in three black men in their 20s is either imprisoned, jailed, on probation or on parole cries out for a national dialogue on prison reform. Those who think otherwise should consider these statistics: American prisons hold 2.1 million people, about a quarter of the world's prison population. It costs more than $40 billion a year to house prisoners in the United States.
NEWS
By LYNN ANDERSON and LYNN ANDERSON,SUN REPORTER | January 14, 2006
State prison officials, researchers and in-the-trenches advocates gathered at a West Baltimore church yesterday to call for prison reforms, including expanding educational and drug rehabilitation programs, and a support system for inmates after they're released. "It makes no sense to drop people back into the community and say, `Go for it,'" said Joseph T. Jones Jr., an ex-convict and founder of the Center for Fathers, Families and Workforce Development, a Baltimore organization that helps those who have been incarcerated find job training and employment.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | May 23, 1996
Representatives of groups that advocate improving prison conditions and abolishing the death penalty held a rally yesterday afternoon to call for the shutdown of Maryland's "Supermax" prison in the wake of a federal investigation that alleged violations of civil rights there.The protesters also called for mercy for convicted killer Flint Gregory Hunt, who is scheduled to die in Maryland's gas chamber the week of June 10 in the 1985 killing of Baltimore police Officer Vincent Adolfo.Speaking outside the Maryland Correctional Adjustment Center, the East Baltimore prison that officials say is for "the worst of the worst," ex-inmates, family members, friends and advocates of prison reform called for the prison to be shut down.
NEWS
March 11, 2004
GOV. ROBERT L. Ehrlich Jr., a law-and-order Republican, has made drug treatment efforts a top priority of his administration. He has focused on putting nonviolent, drug-addicted offenders into treatment instead of jail, and offering treatment to prisoners before they return to the streets. But a key aspect of the administration's initiatives now before the Maryland General Assembly is in danger of being derailed by cost-cutting, shortsighted legislative budget analysts. Targeted for cuts is the administration's plan to enhance drug treatment and education programs for Maryland prisoners - a welcome reform of the prison system.
NEWS
January 11, 1999
Mario Gozzini, 79, the father of Italian prison reform, died Jan. 2 in Rome. Mr. Gozzini was the author of a 1986 prison reform bill under which prisoners are allowed a partial freedom, including long furloughs. Many have praised the measure as humane, but critics have noted that several high-profile inmates, including some accused of terrorism, have used the furloughs to escape.The Marquess of Bristol, 44, who squandered millions on drugs and was jailed twice for heroin and cocaine possession, died in his sleep yesterday at his family's estate in eastern England near Bury St. Edmunds, said Simon Pott,his agent.
NEWS
January 26, 2005
ROBERT L. EHRLICH Jr. is no Arnold Schwarzenegger. But Maryland's chief executive and California's governor have this in common -- a commitment to prison reform with an emphasis on rehabilitation. In his recent State of the State address, Mr. Schwarzenegger proposed an overhaul of California prisons, a corrections system beset by overcrowding, an abuse scandal, a potential federal takeover and a 61 percent recidivism rate, the nation's highest. Mr. Ehrlich is already committed to diverting nonviolent offenders from prison and better preparing inmates for release.
NEWS
By Barry Rascovar | February 11, 1996
THE PROBLEM with Kathleen Kennedy Townsend is that she doesn't remember Gordon Kamka. How could she? She didn't even move to Maryland until three years after Mr. Kamka's controversial reign as prison secretary ended.Yet there is Lieutenant Governor Townsend pushing the same sort of prison ''reform'' that got Maryland in so much trouble.For those too young to remember, Gov. Harry Hughes hired Mr. Kamka in 1979. Instead of constructing more prisons, Mr. Kamka decided ''we can't build our way out of the problem'' of overcrowding.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr | November 12, 1990
There's a joke among Maryland prison officials about the Division of Correction's preparing for the 21st century -- just as soon as it enters the 20th.It is a wry remark born out of frustration with a system notorious for its foot-dragging despite promises to speed things up.In the past two months, for instance, there has been talk but little action by state officials on resolving problems with the process of calculating sentence lengths -- a process that recently allowed the mistaken early release of two inmates who were charged individually later with killing a total of four people.
NEWS
January 26, 2005
ROBERT L. EHRLICH Jr. is no Arnold Schwarzenegger. But Maryland's chief executive and California's governor have this in common -- a commitment to prison reform with an emphasis on rehabilitation. In his recent State of the State address, Mr. Schwarzenegger proposed an overhaul of California prisons, a corrections system beset by overcrowding, an abuse scandal, a potential federal takeover and a 61 percent recidivism rate, the nation's highest. Mr. Ehrlich is already committed to diverting nonviolent offenders from prison and better preparing inmates for release.
NEWS
June 25, 2004
BLACK MEN IN America have a one-in-three chance of landing in prison in their lifetime. That chilling pronouncement and the fact that one in three black men in their 20s is either imprisoned, jailed, on probation or on parole cries out for a national dialogue on prison reform. Those who think otherwise should consider these statistics: American prisons hold 2.1 million people, about a quarter of the world's prison population. It costs more than $40 billion a year to house prisoners in the United States.
NEWS
March 11, 2004
GOV. ROBERT L. Ehrlich Jr., a law-and-order Republican, has made drug treatment efforts a top priority of his administration. He has focused on putting nonviolent, drug-addicted offenders into treatment instead of jail, and offering treatment to prisoners before they return to the streets. But a key aspect of the administration's initiatives now before the Maryland General Assembly is in danger of being derailed by cost-cutting, shortsighted legislative budget analysts. Targeted for cuts is the administration's plan to enhance drug treatment and education programs for Maryland prisoners - a welcome reform of the prison system.
NEWS
January 11, 1999
Mario Gozzini, 79, the father of Italian prison reform, died Jan. 2 in Rome. Mr. Gozzini was the author of a 1986 prison reform bill under which prisoners are allowed a partial freedom, including long furloughs. Many have praised the measure as humane, but critics have noted that several high-profile inmates, including some accused of terrorism, have used the furloughs to escape.The Marquess of Bristol, 44, who squandered millions on drugs and was jailed twice for heroin and cocaine possession, died in his sleep yesterday at his family's estate in eastern England near Bury St. Edmunds, said Simon Pott,his agent.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | May 23, 1996
Representatives of groups that advocate improving prison conditions and abolishing the death penalty held a rally yesterday afternoon to call for the shutdown of Maryland's "Supermax" prison in the wake of a federal investigation that alleged violations of civil rights there.The protesters also called for mercy for convicted killer Flint Gregory Hunt, who is scheduled to die in Maryland's gas chamber the week of June 10 in the 1985 killing of Baltimore police Officer Vincent Adolfo.Speaking outside the Maryland Correctional Adjustment Center, the East Baltimore prison that officials say is for "the worst of the worst," ex-inmates, family members, friends and advocates of prison reform called for the prison to be shut down.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | February 13, 1996
Dressed in her Sunday best, Nancy Moran is ready to hop the light rail by 12:15, then the bus, to be in a legislative hearing room in Annapolis by 3 p.m. There she'll try to sell a stack of bills for clients who don't vote, are locked up and are about the least popular folks on the planet.Most if not all of Ms. Moran's bills on behalf of state prisoners may die of neglect in a committee file drawer. In a time of getting tougher on criminals, their passing will not be mourned by many.But this is what Nancy Moran does and who she is -- the prisoners' lobbyist.
NEWS
By LYNN ANDERSON and LYNN ANDERSON,SUN REPORTER | January 14, 2006
State prison officials, researchers and in-the-trenches advocates gathered at a West Baltimore church yesterday to call for prison reforms, including expanding educational and drug rehabilitation programs, and a support system for inmates after they're released. "It makes no sense to drop people back into the community and say, `Go for it,'" said Joseph T. Jones Jr., an ex-convict and founder of the Center for Fathers, Families and Workforce Development, a Baltimore organization that helps those who have been incarcerated find job training and employment.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | February 13, 1996
Dressed in her Sunday best, Nancy Moran is ready to hop the light rail by 12:15, then the bus, to be in a legislative hearing room in Annapolis by 3 p.m. There she'll try to sell a stack of bills for clients who don't vote, are locked up and are about the least popular folks on the planet.Most if not all of Ms. Moran's bills on behalf of state prisoners may die of neglect in a committee file drawer. In a time of getting tougher on criminals, their passing will not be mourned by many.But this is what Nancy Moran does and who she is -- the prisoners' lobbyist.
NEWS
By Barry Rascovar | February 11, 1996
THE PROBLEM with Kathleen Kennedy Townsend is that she doesn't remember Gordon Kamka. How could she? She didn't even move to Maryland until three years after Mr. Kamka's controversial reign as prison secretary ended.Yet there is Lieutenant Governor Townsend pushing the same sort of prison ''reform'' that got Maryland in so much trouble.For those too young to remember, Gov. Harry Hughes hired Mr. Kamka in 1979. Instead of constructing more prisons, Mr. Kamka decided ''we can't build our way out of the problem'' of overcrowding.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr | November 12, 1990
There's a joke among Maryland prison officials about the Division of Correction's preparing for the 21st century -- just as soon as it enters the 20th.It is a wry remark born out of frustration with a system notorious for its foot-dragging despite promises to speed things up.In the past two months, for instance, there has been talk but little action by state officials on resolving problems with the process of calculating sentence lengths -- a process that recently allowed the mistaken early release of two inmates who were charged individually later with killing a total of four people.
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