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NEWS
April 20, 2010
Dan Rodricks remains stubbornly obtuse about the disproportionate number of black men who are in prison or on probation or parole. Professor Michelle Alexander affords him an occasion to renew his ignorance ("Jim Crow alive and well in prison system," April 8). Mr. Rodricks observes that "in the mid-1970s, the U.S. prison population was about 300,000. Today it is roughly 2.4 million. ... During the time of this explosion in prison populations, drug arrests climbed while property crime and violent crime dropped."
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NEWS
April 2, 2014
Thanks for your recent editorial highlighting attempts by the National Alliance on Mental Illness Maryland and our partner organizations to pass legislation in this year's General Assembly that would require an independent investigation of the use of isolated confinement in the state's prisons ( "Isolated confinement," March 31). NAMI Maryland is concerned about the extensive use of isolated confinement and other forms of administrative segregation in both adult and juvenile state correctional facilities.
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NEWS
March 4, 2013
For decades, African-Americans have been sentenced to prison at far higher rates than their proportion of the population would suggest. In 2000, black men were incarcerated at nearly eight times the rate of white men, while black women were nearly three times more likely to be imprisoned than white women. But for the first time in recent memory those disparities appear to be narrowing, according to a new study. If the trend continues it could have implications for the racial makeup of prison populations across the U.S., including those in Maryland.
NEWS
August 13, 2013
Attorney General Eric H. Holder's plan to reduce overcrowding in federal prisons by instructing federal prosecutors to stop invoking mandatory minimum sentences against low-level, nonviolent drug offenders was a welcome, if overdue, announcement. The policy's chief shortcoming is that Mr. Holder can't, by himself, correct this long-standing problem. That will require intervention by Congress - as well as by legislatures in states where similar problems exist. That the United States locks up too many people for too long is unquestionably true.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 9, 1998
The nation's prison population grew by 5.2 percent in 1997, according to the Justice Department, even though crime has been declining for six straight years.In a new report, the Justice Department said the number of Americans in local jails and in state and federal prisons rose to 1,725,842 in 1997, up from 1.1 million in 1990. During that period, the incarceration rate in state and federal prisons rose to 445 per 100,000 Americans in 1997, up from 292 per 100,000 in 1990.As for why the number of prisoners continues to grow while crime drops, Pennsylvania Secretary of Corrections Martin Hornsaid: "You have to understand that as incarcerating more people has helped reduce crime, the number of people we sent to prison in previous years is tending to build up, creating a delayed effect.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | January 19, 1997
FRACKVILLE, Pa. -- In the 1950s, Charles Brayford's walk home from school took him past one of the humming textile mills in this tiny Schuylkill County borough. There, he'd see 40 or 50 men who, having lost their jobs when the coal mines closed, were waiting to pick up their wives.By the early '80s, most of the textile industry had vanished, too. Younger people either moved away or commuted long hours to work in Harrisburg or Allentown.Now that sad slide into hard times seems, in the mid-'90s, to be over.
NEWS
August 12, 2011
The United States contains just 5 percent of the world's population, yet its prisons house nearly a quarter of all the people incarcerated around the globe. We imprison our citizens at a greater rate than any other country; as a result, nearly 1 in every 100 Americans today is living behind bars. Since 1970, the U.S. prison population has increased by 700 percent, to 2.4 million people. In Maryland, the state's prison population has tripled to more than 22,000, at a cost of more than $783 million a year.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE WASHINGTON | September 8, 1996
WASHINGTON - The flood of men and women into America's jails and prisons continued last year, bringing their total to more than double the inmate count in 1985, the Justice Department has reported.Rapid prison population growth in recent years - reflecting a national wave of tough anti-drug laws - has strained state and federal budgets as corrections officials have raced to find bed space for 841,200 additional people since 1985, or more than 1,618 new beds every week.The Federal Bureau of Prisons operated 26 percent over capacity in 1995, while state prison systems reported operating between 14 percent and 25 percent above capacity, the new Justice Department study showed.
NEWS
June 3, 2003
NO COUNTRY in the world puts people behind bars at a greater rate than the United States. Even as several states were closing prisons, the national prisoner population had risen to 2,019,234 as of April. For every 100,000 Americans, 702 are in jail or prison, according the U.S. Department of Justice. Russia, the second-place finisher among the nations, jails 665 per 100,000. While some studies show crime rates go down as the prison population goes up, the rising prison population reflects serious failures: of family, of education, of social policy and of rehabilitation.
NEWS
July 22, 1994
A prosecuting attorney in Little Rock last Monday said he wanted Kevin Elders sentenced to 10 years in prison. Mr. Elders, who is the son of U.S. Surgeon General Joycelyn Elders, was convicted of selling one-eighth of an ounce of cocaine to an undercover policeman. This is exactly the sort of unthinking, irrational and harsh law enforcement and administration of justice that have needlessly, recklessly tripled the nation's state and federal prison population in the past decade and a half -- without reducing the amount of violent crime or the public's fear of violent criminals.
NEWS
March 4, 2013
For decades, African-Americans have been sentenced to prison at far higher rates than their proportion of the population would suggest. In 2000, black men were incarcerated at nearly eight times the rate of white men, while black women were nearly three times more likely to be imprisoned than white women. But for the first time in recent memory those disparities appear to be narrowing, according to a new study. If the trend continues it could have implications for the racial makeup of prison populations across the U.S., including those in Maryland.
NEWS
July 14, 2012
Your recent editorial about the use of disciplinary and administrative segregation in Maryland prisons reflects the challenges I have experienced in attempting to secure data about solitary confinement in the state ("Torture by another name," July 8). As a member of the National Religious Campaign Against Torture, which is addressing this issue across the nation, our team has found from our work in other states that reducing the population in solitary confinement - or isolation, as it is often euphemistically called - can result in considerable cost savings, less recidivism and a decrease in violent or suicidal behavior.
NEWS
by Annie Linskey | June 25, 2012
The U.S. Supreme Court this morning upheld Maryland's new Congressional map, clearing up one last legal question and affirming that the state's prison population can be counted at their last known address. The new method of counting prisoners was adopted after Sen. Catherine Pugh, of Baltimore, successfully pushed legislation intended to boost population in the city. Previously prisoners were counted at their correctional institutions, a practice that critics said unfairly increased the population of prison towns.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2012
The U.S. Supreme Court affirmed Monday a lower court's ruling upholding Maryland's new congressional redistricting plan, which counts inmates as living at their last-known addresses instead of in their prison cells. But it may not be the last word on the matter. Some Republican lawmakers opposed to the map, drawn once each decade based on U.S. census counts, have until Saturday to submit the nearly 56,000 signatures needed to put it on the November ballot and let voters decide whether the plan stays.
NEWS
May 23, 2012
The prospect of spending years behind bars in a tiny cell is sufficiently chilling to deter most people from ever committing a crime. Those who willfully break the law anyway and get caught have no one to blame but themselves when a judge sentences them to prison. But even convicted felons shouldn't have to suffer the extralegal indignity and physical trauma of being raped by fellow inmates and prison staff while they're serving their time. Sexual assaults in the nation's prisons are alarmingly common.
NEWS
January 6, 2012
Peter Hermann 's story on Baltimore murders accurately described the challenges the city faces even as violence there has dropped ("Baltimore murder victims, suspects share ties to criminal justice system," Jan. 2). However, the progress has also allowed Gov. Martin O'Malley to declare that his Violence Prevention Initiative was responsible for the decline - an overreaching claim that flies in the face of data. Baltimore's murder rate has been decreasing for more than a decade, closely tracking a national trend, and it began dropping long before the governor's initiative was launched.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | August 20, 2004
Although it could be 20 years before the prison population in Carroll County triples, the detention center might be obsolete in two years, a possibility that has county and criminal justice officials thinking about alternatives to locking convicts behind bars. According to a preliminary prison study report, there could be more than 600 inmates in the local jail population by 2024, said Thomas J. Rio, chief of the county's Bureau of Building Construction and chairman of the committee in charge of exploring the feasibility of a new detention center.
NEWS
By From staff reports | February 2, 2000
In Baltimore County School report cards to be distributed on Valentine's Day TOWSON -- A snowstorm last week has foiled the Baltimore County school system's efforts to send out student report cards. School report cards for the second quarter were to be distributed to primary and secondary students Monday, schools spokesman Charles A. Herndon said yesterday. But because snow upset school schedules, the date has been rolled back to Feb. 14. Information: 410- 887-6111. College's library systems to link under online database CATONSVILLE -- The library systems of the Essex, Dundalk and Catonsville campuses of Community College of Baltimore County will be merged under a new Web-based database.
NEWS
August 22, 2011
Regarding your editorial about the potential cost savings from reducing the size of Maryland's prison population ("Downsizing Md.'s prisons," Aug. 14), there is a simple, concrete step that the governor could take now to achieve that goal: Scrap plans to build a new jail in Baltimore City to house youths under the age of 18 who are charged as adults. This facility alone is estimated to cost approximately $100 million to build and $8 million a year to operate. While many advocates agree that holding youths charged as adults in the Baltimore City Detention Center is problematic, the construction and operation of a new pretrial facility is an ill-advised investment that will unjustifiably strain the state budget while offering little prospect for reducing the crime rate.
NEWS
August 12, 2011
The United States contains just 5 percent of the world's population, yet its prisons house nearly a quarter of all the people incarcerated around the globe. We imprison our citizens at a greater rate than any other country; as a result, nearly 1 in every 100 Americans today is living behind bars. Since 1970, the U.S. prison population has increased by 700 percent, to 2.4 million people. In Maryland, the state's prison population has tripled to more than 22,000, at a cost of more than $783 million a year.
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