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NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | September 23, 2009
A Baltimore man convicted of killing two men was sentenced this week to two terms of life plus 170 years in prison by a judge who questioned why he was allowed to stay in this country after previous convictions. Bagada Dionas, 23, and his father legally immigrated to the U.S. in the 1990s as refugees from Liberia, Baltimore prosecutor Rita Wisthoff-Ito said in court Monday. But in his teen years, the younger Dionas amassed a juvenile record that included armed robberies, drug dealing and car theft, according to court records.
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NEWS
November 17, 1997
THREE TIMES IN 12 DAYS, inmates were freed from the state prison system when they should have remained locked up. That such a mistake could occur once is enough to shake public confidence in the government's ability to protect citizens. But three times in less than a month suggests the need for more something more than the temporary suspension of the prison officials responsible for releasing the inmates prematurely.In the latest incident, a telephone call from a scared witness let police know murder suspect Larry George "High Top" Owens was on the street when he should have been in a cell awaiting trial.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 2, 2004
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court will reopen the constitutional question of whether prison officials can segregate inmates in an effort to prevent racial violence behind the walls. In a brief order yesterday, the justices agreed to hear a challenge by a California inmate to a state prison policy of initially assigning every new prisoner only to a cell occupied by another member of the same race. A key issue is whether the justices will judge such segregation under a constitutional standard that almost never tolerates public policy that is based on race or under a more relaxed approach that gives wide discretion to wardens to manage their prison populations.
NEWS
September 27, 2002
AFTER MOUNT VERNON residents vehemently opposed locating Tamar's Children, a program for pregnant inmates, in their neighborhood, Maryland's top prison official vowed to keep searching for a site for the innovative project. But a month later -- and now 18 months after advocates got the go-ahead for the project -- the program still hasn't opened. What a shame that such a good idea, backed by nearly everyone involved, can't overcome bureaucratic snags and delays to become a reality. In the last month, prison officials say, they offered project coordinators space at the Walter P. Carter Center, a state mental health facility in the city.
NEWS
November 25, 1992
With all the problems facing the state's prisons, including the Maryland Correctional Institution at Jessup, state officials should have more important things to worry about than whether a Methodist inmate sits in on Catholic services behind bars. Yet that has not stopped them from enforcing a restrictive new set of religious rules that are as senseless as they are complicated.The rules supposedly stem from a 1970s lawsuit in which Black Muslims sought equal religious treatment in Maryland prisons.
NEWS
By Stephen Henderson and Stephen Henderson,SUN STAFF | May 3, 1998
City and state police recaptured yesterday 30 of the 85 former inmates on supervised release who are being called back to prison because of a Maryland Court of Appeals ruling, state prison officials said.Eighteen of the 30 were arrested in Baltimore, according to state prison officials, but Agent Angelique Cook-Hayes of the Baltimore City Police Department could confirm only that six had been apprehended by city officers. Twelve others were found by state police in nine areas, including Glen Burnie, Annapolis and Laurel.
NEWS
August 16, 2002
IT'S LIKE a scene out of a cheap prison flick: A wickedly hot summer broils female inmates to where a judge decries their predicament as inhumane, prison officials are threatened with fines or jail, and defense attorneys argue (with straight faces) for mass release of the prisoners. In Hollywood, this kind of fantasy thrills. In Baltimore, the reality's not entertaining. The truth is the cluster of buildings that includes the Baltimore City Women's Detention Center represents the state's most pathetic correctional housing.
NEWS
October 2, 2013
During the last decade, the percentage of people released from Maryland's prisons who re-offend within three years has dropped by more than 11 points - and by 3 points in just the last year. Considering the cost to society of the revolving door prison has become for too many in this country, that's a laudable achievement. Yet the fact that more than two in five who are released from prison will still get arrested or violate parole within three years shows just how much more progress remains to be made.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Del Quentin Wilber and Michael Dresser and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | June 16, 1999
Prison officials pointed their fingers at Bell Atlantic yesterday for the failure of four alarms to sound an alert to nearby communities when two inmates escaped last month from Maryland Correctional Institution in Jessup.Richard Rosenblatt, director of neighboring Patuxent Institution, told legislators that a phone company employee diverted wires from the Jessup complex to the remote alarms while doing maintenance work. He said company representatives had repeatedly assured state officials that such a failure would not occur.
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