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Prison Officials

NEWS
May 23, 2012
The prospect of spending years behind bars in a tiny cell is sufficiently chilling to deter most people from ever committing a crime. Those who willfully break the law anyway and get caught have no one to blame but themselves when a judge sentences them to prison. But even convicted felons shouldn't have to suffer the extralegal indignity and physical trauma of being raped by fellow inmates and prison staff while they're serving their time. Sexual assaults in the nation's prisons are alarmingly common.
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,justin.fenton@baltsun.com | October 17, 2009
Prison officials are investigating the fatal stabbing of a 28-year-old man Wednesday night at the Baltimore City Detention Center. Kennard Pratt was stabbed several times while leaving a shower to return to his cell about 7 p.m., authorities said. Detention center and medical staff performed CPR and took him to Maryland Shock Trauma Center, where he was pronounced dead. Pratt had been jailed since February, awaiting trial on murder charges. Officials said no motive or suspect had been identified.
NEWS
September 27, 2002
AFTER MOUNT VERNON residents vehemently opposed locating Tamar's Children, a program for pregnant inmates, in their neighborhood, Maryland's top prison official vowed to keep searching for a site for the innovative project. But a month later -- and now 18 months after advocates got the go-ahead for the project -- the program still hasn't opened. What a shame that such a good idea, backed by nearly everyone involved, can't overcome bureaucratic snags and delays to become a reality. In the last month, prison officials say, they offered project coordinators space at the Walter P. Carter Center, a state mental health facility in the city.
NEWS
November 25, 1992
With all the problems facing the state's prisons, including the Maryland Correctional Institution at Jessup, state officials should have more important things to worry about than whether a Methodist inmate sits in on Catholic services behind bars. Yet that has not stopped them from enforcing a restrictive new set of religious rules that are as senseless as they are complicated.The rules supposedly stem from a 1970s lawsuit in which Black Muslims sought equal religious treatment in Maryland prisons.
NEWS
By Stephen Henderson and Stephen Henderson,SUN STAFF | May 3, 1998
City and state police recaptured yesterday 30 of the 85 former inmates on supervised release who are being called back to prison because of a Maryland Court of Appeals ruling, state prison officials said.Eighteen of the 30 were arrested in Baltimore, according to state prison officials, but Agent Angelique Cook-Hayes of the Baltimore City Police Department could confirm only that six had been apprehended by city officers. Twelve others were found by state police in nine areas, including Glen Burnie, Annapolis and Laurel.
NEWS
October 2, 2013
During the last decade, the percentage of people released from Maryland's prisons who re-offend within three years has dropped by more than 11 points - and by 3 points in just the last year. Considering the cost to society of the revolving door prison has become for too many in this country, that's a laudable achievement. Yet the fact that more than two in five who are released from prison will still get arrested or violate parole within three years shows just how much more progress remains to be made.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann | February 1, 2012
He was on probation and wearing a GPS monitoring device. He was also armed with a rusty machete, and prosecutors said he carjacked a woman as she checked the oil in her car on Ravenwood Avenue in May. On Tuesday, a Baltimore Circuit Court jury convicted the teenager, Terrell Singleton, of carjacking and car theft, and he faces up to 69 years in prison when he is sentenced in April. Prosecutors said the GPS device he was wearing, so that prison officials could keep track of him, put him at the scene of the holdup.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Del Quentin Wilber and Michael Dresser and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | June 16, 1999
Prison officials pointed their fingers at Bell Atlantic yesterday for the failure of four alarms to sound an alert to nearby communities when two inmates escaped last month from Maryland Correctional Institution in Jessup.Richard Rosenblatt, director of neighboring Patuxent Institution, told legislators that a phone company employee diverted wires from the Jessup complex to the remote alarms while doing maintenance work. He said company representatives had repeatedly assured state officials that such a failure would not occur.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN REPORTER | October 31, 2006
A 36-year-old Salisbury woman who was serving a five-year sentence for assault was found dead, apparently by suicide, Sunday at the state's prison for women in Jessup, prison officials said yesterday. The woman, whose identity was not released, tied a sheet around her neck and hanged herself from a vent in her cell, said George Gregory, a prison system spokesman. Correctional officers making their rounds discovered the woman hanging in the cell just before 2 p.m., Gregory said. Attempts to revive her were unsuccessful, he said.
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