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Prison Officials

NEWS
September 27, 2002
AFTER MOUNT VERNON residents vehemently opposed locating Tamar's Children, a program for pregnant inmates, in their neighborhood, Maryland's top prison official vowed to keep searching for a site for the innovative project. But a month later -- and now 18 months after advocates got the go-ahead for the project -- the program still hasn't opened. What a shame that such a good idea, backed by nearly everyone involved, can't overcome bureaucratic snags and delays to become a reality. In the last month, prison officials say, they offered project coordinators space at the Walter P. Carter Center, a state mental health facility in the city.
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NEWS
By Stephen Henderson and Stephen Henderson,SUN STAFF | May 3, 1998
City and state police recaptured yesterday 30 of the 85 former inmates on supervised release who are being called back to prison because of a Maryland Court of Appeals ruling, state prison officials said.Eighteen of the 30 were arrested in Baltimore, according to state prison officials, but Agent Angelique Cook-Hayes of the Baltimore City Police Department could confirm only that six had been apprehended by city officers. Twelve others were found by state police in nine areas, including Glen Burnie, Annapolis and Laurel.
NEWS
November 25, 1992
With all the problems facing the state's prisons, including the Maryland Correctional Institution at Jessup, state officials should have more important things to worry about than whether a Methodist inmate sits in on Catholic services behind bars. Yet that has not stopped them from enforcing a restrictive new set of religious rules that are as senseless as they are complicated.The rules supposedly stem from a 1970s lawsuit in which Black Muslims sought equal religious treatment in Maryland prisons.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,sun reporter | June 5, 2007
A melee at the Metropolitan Transition Center that sent 18 prison inmates to area hospitals on Friday with stab wounds involved a dispute between the Bloods gang and Sunni Muslim prisoners, according to corrections sources. Maj. Priscilla Doggett, a spokeswoman for the prison system, acknowledged for the first time yesterday that a gang might have been involved in the violence that erupted at the state-run prison in Baltimore. But, noting security concerns, she would not provide more detailed information.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Del Quentin Wilber and Michael Dresser and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | June 16, 1999
Prison officials pointed their fingers at Bell Atlantic yesterday for the failure of four alarms to sound an alert to nearby communities when two inmates escaped last month from Maryland Correctional Institution in Jessup.Richard Rosenblatt, director of neighboring Patuxent Institution, told legislators that a phone company employee diverted wires from the Jessup complex to the remote alarms while doing maintenance work. He said company representatives had repeatedly assured state officials that such a failure would not occur.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN REPORTER | October 31, 2006
A 36-year-old Salisbury woman who was serving a five-year sentence for assault was found dead, apparently by suicide, Sunday at the state's prison for women in Jessup, prison officials said yesterday. The woman, whose identity was not released, tied a sheet around her neck and hanged herself from a vent in her cell, said George Gregory, a prison system spokesman. Correctional officers making their rounds discovered the woman hanging in the cell just before 2 p.m., Gregory said. Attempts to revive her were unsuccessful, he said.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | June 26, 1999
Three captains at the Maryland Correctional Institution at Jessup failed to act on an explicit warning two weeks before an escape May 18 that armed robber Byron L. Smoot was planning to break out, a corrections officer has told authorities.Corrections Commissioner William W. Sondervan confirmed yesterday that the officer has submitted a written report to prison officials detailing her warning to her superiors. Sources identified the officer as Bernadette Thomas.Meanwhile, a corrections officer who was fired for failing to react to an alarm is asserting that it did not go off. In an interview with The Sun, Nina M. Polley said a microwave motion detector that should have sounded the alert was not turned on when Smoot and convicted murderer Gregory L. Lawrence fled by scaling a prison fence.
NEWS
By Stephen Power and Stephen Power,Dallas Morning News | December 18, 1994
HUNTSVILLE, Texas -- On the surface, Texas' first tobacco-free prison looks just the way state officials said it would.The day rooms are free of cigarette butts, the floors don't have tobacco juice stains, and the cells smell more like hospital rooms.But after 10 months, the $30 million, 2,000-bed Holliday Unit has one problem, guards and inmates say. Tobacco is still getting in.It comes in all shapes and every manner of disguise -- in hidden pockets that inmates sew to their uniforms before being transferred to Holliday, in oil cans brought by work crews from prisons where tobacco is allowed and, occasionally, by guards looking to make extra money.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,Sun reporter | March 28, 2008
State prison officials said yesterday they have launched a criminal investigation into allegations that eight correctional officers assaulted several inmates at a maximum-security prison - the second case of possible abuse to emerge at a Western Maryland prison this month. The officers from the North Branch Correctional Institution in Cumberland have been placed on administrative leave and face possible termination, prison officials said yesterday. The Maryland State Police are leading a criminal inquiry into the case, prison authorities said.
NEWS
By James Bock | May 26, 1991
A second prison dentist who treated inmates at the Maryland Penitentiary died of AIDS, the dentist's brother confirmed yesterday.Dr. H. Dale Scott, who filled in as prison dentist for 14 days in 1989, died Oct. 12 of acquired immune deficiency syndrome, said his brother, Edward E. Scott of New Braunfels, Texas. He was 49.Dr. Scott substituted in May and June 1989 for the chief prison dentist, Dr. Victor J. Luckritz, who died of AIDS May 7 at the age of 47. Dr. Luckritz treated inmates at the prison from June 1988 to April 1990.
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