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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2010
A man who admitted that he tried to rape a high school student when she passed his Odenton backyard on her way to the school bus was sentenced Tuesday to 20 years in prison. The victim softly wept as Anne Arundel County Circuit Judge Paul A. Hackner ordered a prison term above state guidelines for Jameson Bryan Knott, 20, whom he described as having "significant, longstanding mental health problems. " "The sentence is appropriate," Assistant State's Attorney Sandra F. Howell said afterward.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | February 12, 2001
Vouthynor "Billy" Sovann, 21, will soon be taking online courses in math, English and sociology from a consortium of Maryland colleges. He'll submit his assignments by computer, e-mail his professors and complete his homework with information found on the World Wide Web. But Sovann isn't a typical telecommuting student. The computer he'll be working on is behind the walls and barbed wire of the Patuxent Institution, one of Maryland's maximum-security prisons. Sovann is a convicted murderer serving a life sentence.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN REPORTER | September 28, 2006
A transgendered convicted thief who was released from prison last year to die of AIDS at home rather than in a prison hospital was charged yesterday with attempting to falsify a death certificate to avoid being prosecuted on new identity theft charges. Dee Deirdre Farmer, 41, who also goes by the names of Douglas C. Farmer and Larry Gilbert Prescott, was accused of forging a Baltimore Circuit Court order to change the death certificate of a man named Charles Smith to reflect that Farmer was the person who had died.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | October 9, 1998
In an unusual mea culpa, the state's highest court said yesterday that it did not mean for Maryland prison officials to recalculate the sentences of nearly 2,000 inmates, prompting the rearrest last spring of 53 freed prisoners.The admission came in a Court of Appeals opinion -- issued after a 4-3 vote by the judges -- that a former inmate should not have been rearrested."We inadvertently led the Division [of Corrections] to a conclusion that was both unintended and erroneous," according the opinion written by Judge Alan M. Wilner.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann | peter.hermann@baltsun.com | February 28, 2010
Raymond Taylor seemed to enjoy writing letters from his prison cell at the North Branch Correctional Institution in Cumberland in the far western reaches of Maryland. He argued that the judge made a mistake when sentencing him to three consecutive life terms in prison for shooting his ex-girlfriend and her two teen-age daughters in August 2004. He wanted his sentence reconsidered but abruptly changed his mind and asked that a hearing be delayed so he had more time to prove himself.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | February 19, 2012
A story for Black History Month. Bryan Stevenson is director of the Equal Justice Initiative, a Montgomery, Ala.-based organization he founded in 1989 to provide legal representation for the indigent and incarcerated. The EJI ( www.eji.org ) doesn't charge its clients but, says Mr. Stevenson, he will sometimes require them to read selected books. Last year, Mr. Stevenson sent two books to prisoner Mark Melvin, who is doing life for a murder he committed when he was 14. One was "Mountains Beyond Mountains," about a doctor's struggle to bring medical services to Haiti.
NEWS
September 27, 2002
AFTER MOUNT VERNON residents vehemently opposed locating Tamar's Children, a program for pregnant inmates, in their neighborhood, Maryland's top prison official vowed to keep searching for a site for the innovative project. But a month later -- and now 18 months after advocates got the go-ahead for the project -- the program still hasn't opened. What a shame that such a good idea, backed by nearly everyone involved, can't overcome bureaucratic snags and delays to become a reality. In the last month, prison officials say, they offered project coordinators space at the Walter P. Carter Center, a state mental health facility in the city.
NEWS
By Stephen Henderson and Stephen Henderson,SUN STAFF | May 3, 1998
City and state police recaptured yesterday 30 of the 85 former inmates on supervised release who are being called back to prison because of a Maryland Court of Appeals ruling, state prison officials said.Eighteen of the 30 were arrested in Baltimore, according to state prison officials, but Agent Angelique Cook-Hayes of the Baltimore City Police Department could confirm only that six had been apprehended by city officers. Twelve others were found by state police in nine areas, including Glen Burnie, Annapolis and Laurel.
NEWS
November 25, 1992
With all the problems facing the state's prisons, including the Maryland Correctional Institution at Jessup, state officials should have more important things to worry about than whether a Methodist inmate sits in on Catholic services behind bars. Yet that has not stopped them from enforcing a restrictive new set of religious rules that are as senseless as they are complicated.The rules supposedly stem from a 1970s lawsuit in which Black Muslims sought equal religious treatment in Maryland prisons.
NEWS
By GREG GARLAND and GREG GARLAND,SUN REPORTER | November 6, 2005
State prison officials say they have filed criminal charges against several correctional officers and visitors who they say were caught trying to smuggle drugs and other contraband into Maryland prisons in recent weeks. "Officers and visitors bringing contraband into our facilities will not be tolerated because their actions create an atmosphere that leads to violence and compromises the safety of the staff, inmates and the public," Division of Correction Commissioner Frank C. Sizer Jr. said.
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