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NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | June 5, 1999
With state legislators seeking explanations for the escape of two inmates from a Jessup prison two weeks ago, top prison officials said yesterday that they are transferring the warden and have fired a corrections officer.Prison officials said they have suspended three guards for mistakes made after the escape May 18 from the Maryland Correctional Institution and are investigating allegations of negligence by as many as five others."We're going to make sure this doesn't happen again," said William W. Sondervan, the commissioner of the Division of Corrections.
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NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz | julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | February 10, 2010
Some Maryland lawmakers want to require the state prison system to notify federal authorities when an inmate may be in the country unlawfully - potentially resurrecting last year's debate about how the state is responding to an influx of illegal immigrants. The proposal, backed by a group of powerful Democratic senators that includes Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller, came before a committee Tuesday. Sen. James E. DeGrange Sr. of Anne Arundel County said the measure could save the state millions by shifting incarceration costs away from the state by deporting more illegal immigrants.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Ruma Kumar and Gus G. Sentementes and Ruma Kumar,Sun reporter | March 3, 2007
An inmate wounded a correctional officer with a homemade knife yesterday inside the Maryland House of Correction in Jessup, and Gov. Martin O'Malley and prison officials responded by vowing to move swiftly to improve staffing and security within the troubled system. The officer was attempting to put an inmate back in his cell when the man turned and stabbed him seven times in the upper body, prison officials said. The 28-year-old officer had been on the job since November; the 38-year-old inmate, whose name was withheld, is serving a life sentence for murder, officials said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | February 12, 2001
Vouthynor "Billy" Sovann, 21, will soon be taking online courses in math, English and sociology from a consortium of Maryland colleges. He'll submit his assignments by computer, e-mail his professors and complete his homework with information found on the World Wide Web. But Sovann isn't a typical telecommuting student. The computer he'll be working on is behind the walls and barbed wire of the Patuxent Institution, one of Maryland's maximum-security prisons. Sovann is a convicted murderer serving a life sentence.
NEWS
By Tom Keyser and Thomas W. Waldron and Tom Keyser and Thomas W. Waldron,Evening Sun Staff | July 18, 1991
Although relieved that a tense, 23-hour hostage crisis at th Maryland Penitentiary ended without bloodshed, Bishop L. Robinson, state public safety secretary, says future crises are unavoidable as long as the inmate population continues to grow.The crisis, which ended at 8 o'clock last night with the peaceful release of the final hostage, was actually the result of a botched ++ escape attempt, prison officials said.But once the inmates of C Dormitory in the ancient Baltimore prison took two guards hostage and held them at gunpoint, the main inmate grievance expressed over and over was intolerable, potentially explosive, overcrowding.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Evening Sun Staff | May 24, 1991
A recent study by researchers affiliated with Johns Hopkins Hospital and the Maryland Division of Correction found that every year, nearly one-half of 1 percent of all inmates in the state prison system become infected with the AIDS virus while they are incarcerated.Given the size of the current population, that means about 90 inmates will be infected while incarcerated this year.While no one knows for sure, medical experts estimate that as many as 10 percent of the state's total of about 18,300 inmates are already infected with the AIDS virus.
NEWS
By JULIE BYKOWICZ and JULIE BYKOWICZ,SUN REPORTER | October 6, 2005
The teenager who has been at a pretrial detention center for almost a year in spite of a felony conviction and five-year sentence has been transferred to the state's prison system. Moshe Khaver was being held yesterday at the Maryland Reception, Diagnostic and Classification Center in Baltimore, where he will be assessed before moving to a prison to serve out the rest of his term. Khaver, 19, pleaded guilty last fall to first-degree assault. He admitted running over another teen, who spent five weeks in a coma and suffered permanent injuries, during a dispute about $20 in marijuana.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Gus G. Sentementes and Greg Garland and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | September 16, 2004
State prison officials assured a legislative panel yesterday that they have made significant changes to "use of force" policies - including restrictions on the use of pepper spray - since the death of a prison inmate in Western Maryland on April 30. But the officials refused to answer any specific questions about their handling of Ifeanyi A. Iko's death or to show legislators videotapes of Iko's forcible removal from his cell at Western Correctional Institution...
NEWS
By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | July 24, 2001
Hundreds of inmates at the Maryland House of Correction Annex in Jessup went on strike early yesterday - refusing to leave their cells to eat or work - giving prison officials little indication why. Prison officials suspect the inmates, who refused to talk to the correctional officers, are protesting the statewide ban on cigarette smoking that went into effect July 2 at Maryland's 25 state prisons. "The inmates are not saying anything about what their grievances are," David B. Bowers, spokesman for the state Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services, said yesterday evening.
NEWS
By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | July 24, 2001
Hundreds of inmates at the Maryland House of Correction Annex in Jessup went on strike early yesterday - refusing to leave their cells to eat or work - giving prison officials little indication why. Prison officials suspect the inmates, who refused to talk to the correctional officers, are protesting the statewide ban on cigarette smoking that went into effect July 2 at Maryland's 25 state prisons. "The inmates are not saying anything about what their grievances are," David B. Bowers, spokesman for the state Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services, said yesterday evening.
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