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NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | June 26, 1999
Three captains at the Maryland Correctional Institution at Jessup failed to act on an explicit warning two weeks before an escape May 18 that armed robber Byron L. Smoot was planning to break out, a corrections officer has told authorities.Corrections Commissioner William W. Sondervan confirmed yesterday that the officer has submitted a written report to prison officials detailing her warning to her superiors. Sources identified the officer as Bernadette Thomas.Meanwhile, a corrections officer who was fired for failing to react to an alarm is asserting that it did not go off. In an interview with The Sun, Nina M. Polley said a microwave motion detector that should have sounded the alert was not turned on when Smoot and convicted murderer Gregory L. Lawrence fled by scaling a prison fence.
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NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2010
Five state inmates committed to a prison in Baltimore were stabbed Monday afternoon and taken to area hospitals, prison officials said. None of the injuries were considered life threatening and no officers were injured, said prison system spokesman Rick Binetti. The injuries occurred after a fight broke out around 4:30 p.m. at a dorm in the Metropolitan Transition Center, a minimum security wing of the state facility on Fallsway. No other details were immediately available.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | June 7, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court raised a bit higher yesterday the legal shield around prison officials who are sued by inmates over homosexual rape, other behind-the-walls violence, or living conditions that threaten life or health.The wardens, deputies and guards who run prisons, the court ruled unanimously, cannot be sued just because violent or unhealthy conditions exist and those officials should have known about them and done something.If an official is not aware of "a substantial risk of serious harm" to prisoners, that official cannot be sued even if the threatening conditions were "obvious," the court declared.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | October 9, 1998
In an unusual mea culpa, the state's highest court said yesterday that it did not mean for Maryland prison officials to recalculate the sentences of nearly 2,000 inmates, prompting the rearrest last spring of 53 freed prisoners.The admission came in a Court of Appeals opinion -- issued after a 4-3 vote by the judges -- that a former inmate should not have been rearrested."We inadvertently led the Division [of Corrections] to a conclusion that was both unintended and erroneous," according the opinion written by Judge Alan M. Wilner.
NEWS
September 27, 2002
AFTER MOUNT VERNON residents vehemently opposed locating Tamar's Children, a program for pregnant inmates, in their neighborhood, Maryland's top prison official vowed to keep searching for a site for the innovative project. But a month later -- and now 18 months after advocates got the go-ahead for the project -- the program still hasn't opened. What a shame that such a good idea, backed by nearly everyone involved, can't overcome bureaucratic snags and delays to become a reality. In the last month, prison officials say, they offered project coordinators space at the Walter P. Carter Center, a state mental health facility in the city.
NEWS
By Stephen Henderson and Stephen Henderson,SUN STAFF | May 3, 1998
City and state police recaptured yesterday 30 of the 85 former inmates on supervised release who are being called back to prison because of a Maryland Court of Appeals ruling, state prison officials said.Eighteen of the 30 were arrested in Baltimore, according to state prison officials, but Agent Angelique Cook-Hayes of the Baltimore City Police Department could confirm only that six had been apprehended by city officers. Twelve others were found by state police in nine areas, including Glen Burnie, Annapolis and Laurel.
NEWS
November 25, 1992
With all the problems facing the state's prisons, including the Maryland Correctional Institution at Jessup, state officials should have more important things to worry about than whether a Methodist inmate sits in on Catholic services behind bars. Yet that has not stopped them from enforcing a restrictive new set of religious rules that are as senseless as they are complicated.The rules supposedly stem from a 1970s lawsuit in which Black Muslims sought equal religious treatment in Maryland prisons.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,Sun reporter | April 5, 2008
Nine correctional officers at a medium-security prison in Hagerstown were fired yesterday amid allegations that they assaulted an inmate last month, according to a spokesman for the Maryland Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services. The nine officers, who worked at the Roxbury Correctional Institution, plan to appeal the decision, according to the union representing correctional officers in the state of Maryland. "These mass firings are a reckless rush to judgment on the state's part," said Joe Lawrence, spokesman for American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Del Quentin Wilber and Michael Dresser and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | June 16, 1999
Prison officials pointed their fingers at Bell Atlantic yesterday for the failure of four alarms to sound an alert to nearby communities when two inmates escaped last month from Maryland Correctional Institution in Jessup.Richard Rosenblatt, director of neighboring Patuxent Institution, told legislators that a phone company employee diverted wires from the Jessup complex to the remote alarms while doing maintenance work. He said company representatives had repeatedly assured state officials that such a failure would not occur.
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