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By Gus G. Sentementes and Ruma Kumar and Gus G. Sentementes and Ruma Kumar,Sun reporter | March 3, 2007
An inmate wounded a correctional officer with a homemade knife yesterday inside the Maryland House of Correction in Jessup, and Gov. Martin O'Malley and prison officials responded by vowing to move swiftly to improve staffing and security within the troubled system. The officer was attempting to put an inmate back in his cell when the man turned and stabbed him seven times in the upper body, prison officials said. The 28-year-old officer had been on the job since November; the 38-year-old inmate, whose name was withheld, is serving a life sentence for murder, officials said.
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NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Evening Sun Staff | May 24, 1991
A recent study by researchers affiliated with Johns Hopkins Hospital and the Maryland Division of Correction found that every year, nearly one-half of 1 percent of all inmates in the state prison system become infected with the AIDS virus while they are incarcerated.Given the size of the current population, that means about 90 inmates will be infected while incarcerated this year.While no one knows for sure, medical experts estimate that as many as 10 percent of the state's total of about 18,300 inmates are already infected with the AIDS virus.
NEWS
By JULIE BYKOWICZ and JULIE BYKOWICZ,SUN REPORTER | October 6, 2005
The teenager who has been at a pretrial detention center for almost a year in spite of a felony conviction and five-year sentence has been transferred to the state's prison system. Moshe Khaver was being held yesterday at the Maryland Reception, Diagnostic and Classification Center in Baltimore, where he will be assessed before moving to a prison to serve out the rest of his term. Khaver, 19, pleaded guilty last fall to first-degree assault. He admitted running over another teen, who spent five weeks in a coma and suffered permanent injuries, during a dispute about $20 in marijuana.
NEWS
By Tom Keyser and Thomas W. Waldron and Tom Keyser and Thomas W. Waldron,Evening Sun Staff | July 18, 1991
Although relieved that a tense, 23-hour hostage crisis at th Maryland Penitentiary ended without bloodshed, Bishop L. Robinson, state public safety secretary, says future crises are unavoidable as long as the inmate population continues to grow.The crisis, which ended at 8 o'clock last night with the peaceful release of the final hostage, was actually the result of a botched ++ escape attempt, prison officials said.But once the inmates of C Dormitory in the ancient Baltimore prison took two guards hostage and held them at gunpoint, the main inmate grievance expressed over and over was intolerable, potentially explosive, overcrowding.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Gus G. Sentementes and Greg Garland and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | September 16, 2004
State prison officials assured a legislative panel yesterday that they have made significant changes to "use of force" policies - including restrictions on the use of pepper spray - since the death of a prison inmate in Western Maryland on April 30. But the officials refused to answer any specific questions about their handling of Ifeanyi A. Iko's death or to show legislators videotapes of Iko's forcible removal from his cell at Western Correctional Institution...
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN REPORTER | September 28, 2006
A transgendered convicted thief who was released from prison last year to die of AIDS at home rather than in a prison hospital was charged yesterday with attempting to falsify a death certificate to avoid being prosecuted on new identity theft charges. Dee Deirdre Farmer, 41, who also goes by the names of Douglas C. Farmer and Larry Gilbert Prescott, was accused of forging a Baltimore Circuit Court order to change the death certificate of a man named Charles Smith to reflect that Farmer was the person who had died.
NEWS
By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | July 24, 2001
Hundreds of inmates at the Maryland House of Correction Annex in Jessup went on strike early yesterday - refusing to leave their cells to eat or work - giving prison officials little indication why. Prison officials suspect the inmates, who refused to talk to the correctional officers, are protesting the statewide ban on cigarette smoking that went into effect July 2 at Maryland's 25 state prisons. "The inmates are not saying anything about what their grievances are," David B. Bowers, spokesman for the state Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services, said yesterday evening.
NEWS
By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | July 24, 2001
Hundreds of inmates at the Maryland House of Correction Annex in Jessup went on strike early yesterday - refusing to leave their cells to eat or work - giving prison officials little indication why. Prison officials suspect the inmates, who refused to talk to the correctional officers, are protesting the statewide ban on cigarette smoking that went into effect July 2 at Maryland's 25 state prisons. "The inmates are not saying anything about what their grievances are," David B. Bowers, spokesman for the state Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services, said yesterday evening.
NEWS
June 19, 2000
MARYLAND PRISON officials want to get rid of Jermaine Bishop -- for good. Bishop is approaching the end of an eight-month stint in prison for a drug conviction. Cross your fingers. His outcome could show whether a year-old program to reduce recidivism is working. The 24-year-old, like many other convicts, will soon be back on the street facing the inevitable fork in the road. He could get a job, get his high school diploma and never look back toward the drab prison complex in Baltimore where he is confined.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | September 23, 2009
A Baltimore man convicted of killing two men was sentenced this week to two terms of life plus 170 years in prison by a judge who questioned why he was allowed to stay in this country after previous convictions. Bagada Dionas, 23, and his father legally immigrated to the U.S. in the 1990s as refugees from Liberia, Baltimore prosecutor Rita Wisthoff-Ito said in court Monday. But in his teen years, the younger Dionas amassed a juvenile record that included armed robberies, drug dealing and car theft, according to court records.
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