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By Greg Garland and Gus G. Sentementes and Greg Garland and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | September 16, 2004
State prison officials assured a legislative panel yesterday that they have made significant changes to "use of force" policies - including restrictions on the use of pepper spray - since the death of a prison inmate in Western Maryland on April 30. But the officials refused to answer any specific questions about their handling of Ifeanyi A. Iko's death or to show legislators videotapes of Iko's forcible removal from his cell at Western Correctional Institution...
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NEWS
By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | July 24, 2001
Hundreds of inmates at the Maryland House of Correction Annex in Jessup went on strike early yesterday - refusing to leave their cells to eat or work - giving prison officials little indication why. Prison officials suspect the inmates, who refused to talk to the correctional officers, are protesting the statewide ban on cigarette smoking that went into effect July 2 at Maryland's 25 state prisons. "The inmates are not saying anything about what their grievances are," David B. Bowers, spokesman for the state Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services, said yesterday evening.
NEWS
By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | July 24, 2001
Hundreds of inmates at the Maryland House of Correction Annex in Jessup went on strike early yesterday - refusing to leave their cells to eat or work - giving prison officials little indication why. Prison officials suspect the inmates, who refused to talk to the correctional officers, are protesting the statewide ban on cigarette smoking that went into effect July 2 at Maryland's 25 state prisons. "The inmates are not saying anything about what their grievances are," David B. Bowers, spokesman for the state Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services, said yesterday evening.
NEWS
June 19, 2000
MARYLAND PRISON officials want to get rid of Jermaine Bishop -- for good. Bishop is approaching the end of an eight-month stint in prison for a drug conviction. Cross your fingers. His outcome could show whether a year-old program to reduce recidivism is working. The 24-year-old, like many other convicts, will soon be back on the street facing the inevitable fork in the road. He could get a job, get his high school diploma and never look back toward the drab prison complex in Baltimore where he is confined.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | September 23, 2009
A Baltimore man convicted of killing two men was sentenced this week to two terms of life plus 170 years in prison by a judge who questioned why he was allowed to stay in this country after previous convictions. Bagada Dionas, 23, and his father legally immigrated to the U.S. in the 1990s as refugees from Liberia, Baltimore prosecutor Rita Wisthoff-Ito said in court Monday. But in his teen years, the younger Dionas amassed a juvenile record that included armed robberies, drug dealing and car theft, according to court records.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | June 7, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court raised a bit higher yesterday the legal shield around prison officials who are sued by inmates over homosexual rape, other behind-the-walls violence, or living conditions that threaten life or health.The wardens, deputies and guards who run prisons, the court ruled unanimously, cannot be sued just because violent or unhealthy conditions exist and those officials should have known about them and done something.If an official is not aware of "a substantial risk of serious harm" to prisoners, that official cannot be sued even if the threatening conditions were "obvious," the court declared.
NEWS
November 17, 1997
THREE TIMES IN 12 DAYS, inmates were freed from the state prison system when they should have remained locked up. That such a mistake could occur once is enough to shake public confidence in the government's ability to protect citizens. But three times in less than a month suggests the need for more something more than the temporary suspension of the prison officials responsible for releasing the inmates prematurely.In the latest incident, a telephone call from a scared witness let police know murder suspect Larry George "High Top" Owens was on the street when he should have been in a cell awaiting trial.
NEWS
By Scott Gold and Scott Gold,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 19, 2004
HOUSTON - Bringing an abrupt end to a case that had ignited debate over condemning the mentally ill to die, Texas prison officials executed a killer yesterday who was a diagnosed schizophrenic, who once claimed that a plate of beans had spoken to him and who accused his sisters of being spies. Kelsey Patterson, 50, was killed by lethal injection. Patterson was convicted in the 1992 slaying of a businessman and the man's secretary in his hometown of Palestine. After the shootings, Patterson went home, took off all his clothes except his socks and stood in the middle of the street until the police came.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | October 9, 1998
In an unusual mea culpa, the state's highest court said yesterday that it did not mean for Maryland prison officials to recalculate the sentences of nearly 2,000 inmates, prompting the rearrest last spring of 53 freed prisoners.The admission came in a Court of Appeals opinion -- issued after a 4-3 vote by the judges -- that a former inmate should not have been rearrested."We inadvertently led the Division [of Corrections] to a conclusion that was both unintended and erroneous," according the opinion written by Judge Alan M. Wilner.
NEWS
August 6, 2006
The recent murder of corrections Officer David McGuinn pointed up the state's reliance on a century-old, run-down prison to house about half of the system's maximum-security inmates. It's a situation that won't change until construction at a new prison in Cumberland is completed in January 2008. Until then, state prison officials have to contend with a more pressing concern - how to keep Maryland's prisons adequately and safely staffed. At the time of Officer McGuinn's murder, the House of Correction had 47 vacancies among its staff of 312 guards.
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