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By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | July 24, 2001
Hundreds of inmates at the Maryland House of Correction Annex in Jessup went on strike early yesterday - refusing to leave their cells to eat or work - giving prison officials little indication why. Prison officials suspect the inmates, who refused to talk to the correctional officers, are protesting the statewide ban on cigarette smoking that went into effect July 2 at Maryland's 25 state prisons. "The inmates are not saying anything about what their grievances are," David B. Bowers, spokesman for the state Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services, said yesterday evening.
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NEWS
By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | July 24, 2001
Hundreds of inmates at the Maryland House of Correction Annex in Jessup went on strike early yesterday - refusing to leave their cells to eat or work - giving prison officials little indication why. Prison officials suspect the inmates, who refused to talk to the correctional officers, are protesting the statewide ban on cigarette smoking that went into effect July 2 at Maryland's 25 state prisons. "The inmates are not saying anything about what their grievances are," David B. Bowers, spokesman for the state Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services, said yesterday evening.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | June 7, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court raised a bit higher yesterday the legal shield around prison officials who are sued by inmates over homosexual rape, other behind-the-walls violence, or living conditions that threaten life or health.The wardens, deputies and guards who run prisons, the court ruled unanimously, cannot be sued just because violent or unhealthy conditions exist and those officials should have known about them and done something.If an official is not aware of "a substantial risk of serious harm" to prisoners, that official cannot be sued even if the threatening conditions were "obvious," the court declared.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | October 9, 1998
In an unusual mea culpa, the state's highest court said yesterday that it did not mean for Maryland prison officials to recalculate the sentences of nearly 2,000 inmates, prompting the rearrest last spring of 53 freed prisoners.The admission came in a Court of Appeals opinion -- issued after a 4-3 vote by the judges -- that a former inmate should not have been rearrested."We inadvertently led the Division [of Corrections] to a conclusion that was both unintended and erroneous," according the opinion written by Judge Alan M. Wilner.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2011
As Stanley Dunham neared the end of a 15-year sentence for attempted murder, prison officials had approved him for a work program that had him assisting in making deliveries around the region. Day after day for six months, he went out on his rounds, and each time returned to the facility. But on Wednesday afternoon, officials say, the 33-year-old walked away from his supervisor at a Southwest Baltimore shopping center and got into an argument. He was shot twice, and was last reported in critical condition.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2013
State police are investigating the possible killing of an inmate Tuesday night at a prison in Hagerstown, the fifth such incident at a state prison in six months. State police said the victim was a 22-year-old inmate at the Maryland Correctional Institution, a medium-security prison. Authorities have declined to identify him pending notification of his family. According to state police, the inmate was found standing near a bunk and with blood on his clothes about 10:30 p.m. by a guard conducting a nightly count.
NEWS
November 25, 1992
With all the problems facing the state's prisons, including the Maryland Correctional Institution at Jessup, state officials should have more important things to worry about than whether a Methodist inmate sits in on Catholic services behind bars. Yet that has not stopped them from enforcing a restrictive new set of religious rules that are as senseless as they are complicated.The rules supposedly stem from a 1970s lawsuit in which Black Muslims sought equal religious treatment in Maryland prisons.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | November 27, 2012
A 20-year-old Baltimore man serving an 18-month prison sentence on drug distribution and gun convictions at a correctional facility in Cumberland was severely beaten there Monday and is now close to death, according to his family and state corrections officials. Jerod Pridget of East Baltimore was found unresponsive and with "severe head trauma" in his cell at the Western Correctional Institution just before noon Monday and was rushed to Western Maryland Regional Medical Center, officials said.
NEWS
By Stephen Power and Stephen Power,Dallas Morning News | December 18, 1994
HUNTSVILLE, Texas -- On the surface, Texas' first tobacco-free prison looks just the way state officials said it would.The day rooms are free of cigarette butts, the floors don't have tobacco juice stains, and the cells smell more like hospital rooms.But after 10 months, the $30 million, 2,000-bed Holliday Unit has one problem, guards and inmates say. Tobacco is still getting in.It comes in all shapes and every manner of disguise -- in hidden pockets that inmates sew to their uniforms before being transferred to Holliday, in oil cans brought by work crews from prisons where tobacco is allowed and, occasionally, by guards looking to make extra money.
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