Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPrison Officials
IN THE NEWS

Prison Officials

NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2010
Five state inmates committed to a prison in Baltimore were stabbed Monday afternoon and taken to area hospitals, prison officials said. None of the injuries were considered life threatening and no officers were injured, said prison system spokesman Rick Binetti. The injuries occurred after a fight broke out around 4:30 p.m. at a dorm in the Metropolitan Transition Center, a minimum security wing of the state facility on Fallsway. No other details were immediately available.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2010
A man who admitted that he tried to rape a high school student when she passed his Odenton backyard on her way to the school bus was sentenced Tuesday to 20 years in prison. The victim softly wept as Anne Arundel County Circuit Judge Paul A. Hackner ordered a prison term above state guidelines for Jameson Bryan Knott, 20, whom he described as having "significant, longstanding mental health problems. " "The sentence is appropriate," Assistant State's Attorney Sandra F. Howell said afterward.
NEWS
By JULIE BYKOWICZ and JULIE BYKOWICZ,SUN REPORTER | October 6, 2005
The teenager who has been at a pretrial detention center for almost a year in spite of a felony conviction and five-year sentence has been transferred to the state's prison system. Moshe Khaver was being held yesterday at the Maryland Reception, Diagnostic and Classification Center in Baltimore, where he will be assessed before moving to a prison to serve out the rest of his term. Khaver, 19, pleaded guilty last fall to first-degree assault. He admitted running over another teen, who spent five weeks in a coma and suffered permanent injuries, during a dispute about $20 in marijuana.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | September 23, 2009
A Baltimore man convicted of killing two men was sentenced this week to two terms of life plus 170 years in prison by a judge who questioned why he was allowed to stay in this country after previous convictions. Bagada Dionas, 23, and his father legally immigrated to the U.S. in the 1990s as refugees from Liberia, Baltimore prosecutor Rita Wisthoff-Ito said in court Monday. But in his teen years, the younger Dionas amassed a juvenile record that included armed robberies, drug dealing and car theft, according to court records.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | October 9, 1998
In an unusual mea culpa, the state's highest court said yesterday that it did not mean for Maryland prison officials to recalculate the sentences of nearly 2,000 inmates, prompting the rearrest last spring of 53 freed prisoners.The admission came in a Court of Appeals opinion -- issued after a 4-3 vote by the judges -- that a former inmate should not have been rearrested."We inadvertently led the Division [of Corrections] to a conclusion that was both unintended and erroneous," according the opinion written by Judge Alan M. Wilner.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2013
State police are investigating the possible killing of an inmate Tuesday night at a prison in Hagerstown, the fifth such incident at a state prison in six months. State police said the victim was a 22-year-old inmate at the Maryland Correctional Institution, a medium-security prison. Authorities have declined to identify him pending notification of his family. According to state police, the inmate was found standing near a bunk and with blood on his clothes about 10:30 p.m. by a guard conducting a nightly count.
NEWS
September 27, 2002
AFTER MOUNT VERNON residents vehemently opposed locating Tamar's Children, a program for pregnant inmates, in their neighborhood, Maryland's top prison official vowed to keep searching for a site for the innovative project. But a month later -- and now 18 months after advocates got the go-ahead for the project -- the program still hasn't opened. What a shame that such a good idea, backed by nearly everyone involved, can't overcome bureaucratic snags and delays to become a reality. In the last month, prison officials say, they offered project coordinators space at the Walter P. Carter Center, a state mental health facility in the city.
NEWS
November 25, 1992
With all the problems facing the state's prisons, including the Maryland Correctional Institution at Jessup, state officials should have more important things to worry about than whether a Methodist inmate sits in on Catholic services behind bars. Yet that has not stopped them from enforcing a restrictive new set of religious rules that are as senseless as they are complicated.The rules supposedly stem from a 1970s lawsuit in which Black Muslims sought equal religious treatment in Maryland prisons.
NEWS
By Stephen Henderson and Stephen Henderson,SUN STAFF | May 3, 1998
City and state police recaptured yesterday 30 of the 85 former inmates on supervised release who are being called back to prison because of a Maryland Court of Appeals ruling, state prison officials said.Eighteen of the 30 were arrested in Baltimore, according to state prison officials, but Agent Angelique Cook-Hayes of the Baltimore City Police Department could confirm only that six had been apprehended by city officers. Twelve others were found by state police in nine areas, including Glen Burnie, Annapolis and Laurel.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.