Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPrison Officials
IN THE NEWS

Prison Officials

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Justin Fenton | justin.fenton@baltsun.com | February 25, 2010
State prison officials said a 26-year-old New York man serving a triple life sentence for attempted murder was accidentally released from a downtown Baltimore prison Thursday. Officials said Raymond Taylor, who was sentenced to life in prison on an attempted first-degree murder charge in 2005, was erroneously released at 2 p.m. from the Maryland Correctional Adjustment Center. The Baltimore Sun reported at the time that Taylor tried to kill his ex-girlfriend and her two daughters at their Pentland Drive home in Northeast Baltimore.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 2, 2013
During the last decade, the percentage of people released from Maryland's prisons who re-offend within three years has dropped by more than 11 points - and by 3 points in just the last year. Considering the cost to society of the revolving door prison has become for too many in this country, that's a laudable achievement. Yet the fact that more than two in five who are released from prison will still get arrested or violate parole within three years shows just how much more progress remains to be made.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,sun reporter | September 22, 2006
A growing prison population of tough, young gang members and the lack of enough educational and rehabilitation programs for other inmates is fueling much of the violence in Maryland's prisons, corrections officials told a legislative panel yesterday. "Most of it is from gang-related activities, but not all of the violence is from gangs," said John A. Rowley, acting prisons commissioner. "We need to isolate these folks, and that's going to take some time." He and Public Safety Secretary Mary Ann Saar told legislators serving on a joint Senate and House of Delegates oversight committee that they are taking several steps to address security concerns.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2013
The percentage of Maryland ex-offenders likely to return to prison within three years of release has fallen by double digits since 2000, state prison officials reported Monday. Secretary Gary D. Maynard, the top official at the Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services, credited the prison system's improved educational and job skills training programs, as well as stronger partnerships with state agencies that provide medical and mental health services to inmates and upon their release.
NEWS
January 9, 2002
State prison officials were investigating yesterday the stabbing of a 35-year-old inmate at the Maryland House of Correction Annex. Lorenzo Hazel was stabbed multiple times in his upper body about 7 p.m. Monday in a recreation room at the maximum-security prison in Jessup, prison officials said. Correctional officers found prison-made knives in the recreation room, but no one had been charged yesterday, said Lt. Priscilla Doggett, a spokeswoman for the Division of Correction. Hazel, who is serving a life term for murder and armed robbery, was in critical condition yesterday at Maryland Shock Trauma Center in Baltimore, officials said.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2013
Former state Sen. Thomas L. Bromwell Sr., who was sentenced to seven years in prison on a federal bribery conviction, has been released into a community reintegration program, the U.S. Bureau of Prisons said Thursday. Leah Ominsky, a prisons official, confirmed that Bromwell, 63, has been released to a residential re-entry program but remains a federal inmate until his sentence is completed. Ominsky declined to say whether Bromwell is being held at a halfway house or what the conditions of his release are. "The idea is a reintegration into society.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | September 9, 1999
As machines thud and clank in the background, Melvin Powell quietly sprays large metal rectangles -- the brackets for electrical switches -- with a plume of gray paint. Minutes later, he inspects his work as it emerges with a glossy finish from an oven burning at 400 degrees."I think they look pretty good," says Powell, his face partly hidden behind a mask and his hands covered with gray paint. "Maybe when I get out, I can get a job with this company."Powell, 49, isn't an average employee.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | August 13, 1999
The case of a Baltimore drug lord who ordered executions from federal prison is a prime example of how inmates have run deadly criminal enterprises with unfettered access to telephones, a government inquiry has concluded.The Inspector General's Office, an investigative arm of the U.S. Justice Department, accused the Bureau of Prisons of "taking insufficient steps to address this abuse" despite being aware of widespread problems for years."A significant number of federal inmates use prison telephones to commit serious crimes while incarcerated, including murder, drug trafficking and fraud," Inspector General Michael R. Bromwich concluded.
NEWS
By Ken Ellingwood and Ken Ellingwood,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 16, 2004
JERUSALEM - An estimated 1,500 Palestinians held in Israeli prisons launched a hunger strike yesterday, demanding more visits with family members, an end to strip searches and better overall conditions. The demonstration began in three Israeli prisons, and advocates said they expected it to grow to include hundreds more Palestinians held in other facilities on security-related charges. Advocates said the strike sought to halt frequent searches of cells and strip searches of inmates and to ease restrictions on family visits, including removing glass partitions that separate prisoners from visitors.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | June 12, 1999
Facing a potentially contentious legislative hearing, prison officials announced disciplinary action yesterday against four more corrections officers whose negligence contributed to the recent escape of two inmates from a Jessup prison.The firing of another guard, the demotion of a captain to lieutenant and written reprimands of a major and another corrections officer complete the internal disciplinary review at the Maryland Correctional Institution, officials said.That brought to nine the number of officers disciplined or transferred as a result of the May 18 escape.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector and Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2013
The security chief at a maximum-security prison in Western Maryland was removed from the job after senior-level staff failed to notify a guard of threats against him before he was stabbed by an inmate. The move followed Friday's announcement that a top prison official will retire amid calls that he step down in light of a string of inmate-on-officer attacks this summer at North Branch Correctional Institution near Cumberland. More than a dozen officers have been injured in altercations with inmates at North Branch since late June, including the guard who was stabbed in the head and neck several times by an inmate and seriously injured this month.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2013
A Baltimore police officer awaiting trial for murder in the death of his fiancee died early Monday in an apparent suicide in jail, state prison officials said. James Walton Smith, 49, was being held in protective custody in the state's high-rise jail complex at Madison Street and Greenmount Avenue, officials said. The death brings more scrutiny to the embattled state corrections system, which pledged reforms after the April indictment of an inmate federal prosecutors say conspired with 13 corrections officers in the Baltimore City Detention Center to smuggle in drugs and cellphones.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2013
Phyllis Scott was waiting for the day her son would be released from prison to return to East Baltimore, and she hoped he could steer clear of trouble in the future. But that day never came. Malcolm Jerrod "Rod" Pridget, who was just shy of his 20th birthday, left the Western Correctional Institution in late November in critical condition after sustaining severe head injuries in his cell. He died at the Maryland Shock Trauma Center a couple of days later - another victim in a recent spate of deadly violence in the state's prisons.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2013
State police are investigating the possible killing of an inmate Tuesday night at a prison in Hagerstown, the fifth such incident at a state prison in six months. State police said the victim was a 22-year-old inmate at the Maryland Correctional Institution, a medium-security prison. Authorities have declined to identify him pending notification of his family. According to state police, the inmate was found standing near a bunk and with blood on his clothes about 10:30 p.m. by a guard conducting a nightly count.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2013
Former state Sen. Thomas L. Bromwell Sr., who was sentenced to seven years in prison on a federal bribery conviction, has been released into a community reintegration program, the U.S. Bureau of Prisons said Thursday. Leah Ominsky, a prisons official, confirmed that Bromwell, 63, has been released to a residential re-entry program but remains a federal inmate until his sentence is completed. Ominsky declined to say whether Bromwell is being held at a halfway house or what the conditions of his release are. "The idea is a reintegration into society.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | November 27, 2012
A 20-year-old Baltimore man serving an 18-month prison sentence on drug distribution and gun convictions at a correctional facility in Cumberland was severely beaten there Monday and is now close to death, according to his family and state corrections officials. Jerod Pridget of East Baltimore was found unresponsive and with "severe head trauma" in his cell at the Western Correctional Institution just before noon Monday and was rushed to Western Maryland Regional Medical Center, officials said.
NEWS
By Richard A. Serrano and Richard A. Serrano,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 8, 2004
WASHINGTON - U.S. intelligence investigators who complained about the treatment of detainees in Iraq were harassed and threatened by U.S. military prison officials, the director of the Defense Intelligence Agency has told Pentagon officials. Vice Adm. Lowell E. Jacoby said in a memo, made public by the ACLU yesterday, that his DIA interrogators and de-briefers saw prisoners with "burn marks on their backs" and some suffering from "kidney pain." He said two of his DIA subordinates saw prison personnel "punch a prisoner in the face to the point the individual needed medical attention."
FEATURES
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,SUN STAFF | July 18, 2001
It's been 11 days without a cigarette in Building A at the maximum security prison for women in Jessup. Back and forth from the commissary, women carry brown sacks filled to the brim with Sugar Daddies, lollipops and Tootsie Rolls. Candy sales have doubled. Food consumption is up 25 percent. There's a run on Slim Fast. Inside the stark cell block, women in jeans and loose shirts emerge from their rooms holding mops and brooms. Anything to keep their hands busy. Forty percent of the state prison population smokes.
NEWS
May 23, 2012
The prospect of spending years behind bars in a tiny cell is sufficiently chilling to deter most people from ever committing a crime. Those who willfully break the law anyway and get caught have no one to blame but themselves when a judge sentences them to prison. But even convicted felons shouldn't have to suffer the extralegal indignity and physical trauma of being raped by fellow inmates and prison staff while they're serving their time. Sexual assaults in the nation's prisons are alarmingly common.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | February 19, 2012
A story for Black History Month. Bryan Stevenson is director of the Equal Justice Initiative, a Montgomery, Ala.-based organization he founded in 1989 to provide legal representation for the indigent and incarcerated. The EJI ( www.eji.org ) doesn't charge its clients but, says Mr. Stevenson, he will sometimes require them to read selected books. Last year, Mr. Stevenson sent two books to prisoner Mark Melvin, who is doing life for a murder he committed when he was 14. One was "Mountains Beyond Mountains," about a doctor's struggle to bring medical services to Haiti.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.