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By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | November 2, 2011
Nearly two dozen alleged members of a prison gang that started in Maryland and spread across the country have been indicted on federal racketeering charges, including accusations of murder for hire, armed robbery and drug running, officials announced Wednesday. The members of Dead Man Inc., who refer to themselves as "dawgs" and espouse an anti-government philosophy, used contraband cellphones to direct activities and spread gang membership into South Baltimore, eastern Baltimore County, northern Anne Arundel County and several other states, authorities said.
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NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2014
It's almost a year since federal authorities announced that Tavon White and the Black Guerrilla Family gang had corrupted the Baltimore City Detention Center from the inside out, and this week's New Yorker magazine has an expansive look at the case. Staff writer Jeffrey Toobin casts a close eye over the sexual dynamics in the jail, pointing to misogynistic ideas espoused by the BGF's founder in the 1960s, and repeated up by former Maryland gang leader Eric Brown. George Jackson, who founded the BGF in a California prison, was steeped in many of the left wing ideas popular in the 1960s, but he roundly rejected calls for women's rights and espoused polygamy as a way to care for women who would otherwise go unmarried, according to Toobin.
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2012
A co-founder of the Dead Man Incorporated prison gang pleaded guilty Wednesday to his role in the group's murder-for-hire and drug-dealing conspiracy — ensuring that the former Baltimorean serves a life sentence even as he promised followers in missives from behind bars that he would continue to defy the government. The plea agreement will spare James Sweeney, 35, a possible death sentence in a separate case in which he is charged with killing a fellow inmate. The former Locust Point resident, who is being held in federal prison in Texas, admitted under the agreement that he was a leader of Dead Man Inc. and that he ordered "hits for hire in order to raise money and also to enable white prisoners to retaliate against black gangs" in Maryland, court records show.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | November 12, 2013
Baltimore police used battering rams to smash their way into suspected drug dens in a series of pre-dawn raids Tuesday that netted a half-dozen arrests, continuing what authorities describe as aggressive campaign to "dismantle" the Black Guerrilla Family gang. It was the second such strike in less than a week. Officials sharpened their rhetoric against the one-time prison gang they say has been spreading across the city and taking over drug territories through force and intimidation.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2009
The court records read like a scene out of Goodfellas: From their prison cells and with the help of corrections staff, authorities say, members of a violent gang were feasting on salmon and shrimp, sipping Grey Goose vodka and puffing fine cigars - all while directing drug deals, extorting protection money from other inmates and arranging attacks on witnesses and rival gang members. A seven-month investigation that included wiretaps on contraband prison cell phones led to the indictment on drug and weapons charges of 24 people - including four state prison officers - who authorities believe are leaders or associates of the Black Guerrilla Family prison gang, officials announced Thursday.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2011
Anne Arundel County prosecutors will seek life in prison without parole for Perry Roark, a reputed founder and leader of the violent prison gang Dead Man Inc., who was recently charged with first-degree murder in the 1994 death of another prisoner. Roark, 42, a muscular man with a long ponytail, was notified Thursday in Anne Arundel County Circuit court during a hearing to set his trial date, of the possibility that he will never be freed. A trial was scheduled to start March 26, 2012, and is expected to take two weeks.
NEWS
By Christopher Goffard and Christopher Goffard,Los Angeles Times | September 16, 2006
SANTA ANA, Calif. -- Jurors deadlocked yesterday on whether to execute two kingpins of the Aryan Brotherhood prison gang who orchestrated a decades-long reign of murder from their cells. As a result, Barry "The Baron" Mills, 58, and Tyler "The Hulk" Bingham, 59, will live out their years where they have spent most of their adult lives - and where their names carry near-mythic weight: behind bars. The jury had been deliberating on the death penalty for a week when it announced the deadlock Thursday to U.S. District Judge David O. Carter, who told the panel to deliberate further.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2011
Three admitted members of the Black Guerrilla Family prison gang have pleaded guilty to participating in a racketeering conspiracy, according to federal prosecutors. Eric Brown, 42, Ray Olivis, 57 and Rainbow Williams, 32, all of Baltimore, could receive up to 20 years in prison after pleading guilty last week. They're scheduled for sentencing in August. A fourth defendant, Randolph Edison, could receive up to 10 years after pleading guilty to possession of a stolen firearm, according to prosecutors.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2013
As a federal judge handed down a sentence that will virtually ensure Perry Roark spends the rest of his life behind bars, the founder of Maryland's largest home-grown prison gang renounced his association with the group. Roark, a hulking man known as "Rock," was sentenced to life in a prison Monday for his role in creating Dead Man Inc., an organization of white inmates that prosecutors said has since spread to other states and led to street violence throughout the Baltimore region.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2014
It's almost a year since federal authorities announced that Tavon White and the Black Guerrilla Family gang had corrupted the Baltimore City Detention Center from the inside out, and this week's New Yorker magazine has an expansive look at the case. Staff writer Jeffrey Toobin casts a close eye over the sexual dynamics in the jail, pointing to misogynistic ideas espoused by the BGF's founder in the 1960s, and repeated up by former Maryland gang leader Eric Brown. George Jackson, who founded the BGF in a California prison, was steeped in many of the left wing ideas popular in the 1960s, but he roundly rejected calls for women's rights and espoused polygamy as a way to care for women who would otherwise go unmarried, according to Toobin.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2013
Baltimore police, prosecutors and federal agents launched a massive strike against the Black Guerrilla Family gang this week, after indicting 48 suspects in an alleged eight-year campaign of drug dealing and violence that claimed 10 lives. The breadth of the coordinated operation reflects the growing concern over the BGF's role on the streets of Baltimore. Authorities say the one-time prison gang is using force and intimidation to take control of neighborhoods drug corner by drug corner - one reason, they say, violent crime is on the rise.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2013
Baltimore police do not have to reinstate an officer who was fired after the department discovered she was married to an incarcerated Dead Man Inc. gang member, an appeals court has ruled. The Court of Special Appeals on Tuesday upheld a decision by Baltimore police to terminate Meredith Cross, who argued that her constitutional rights were violated when she was fired from the department because she married Carlito Cabana –– a convicted murderer and a member of the Dead Man Inc. prison gang.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2013
After Black Guerrilla Family leader Naim King was killed on Halloween 2007, prosecutors say, fellow gang member David Hunter swore to avenge his death. He waited more than three years, prosecutors say. Finally, they say, in June 2011, he found Henry D. Mills and shot him in the back of the head. Two months later, a grand jury indicted Hunter on murder and handgun charges, but prosecutors continued to gather evidence in hopes that they could show that the killing was part of a larger battle taking place in the city streets.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | February 26, 2013
The self-professed leader of the Maryland-based prison gang Dead Man Inc. was sentenced to life in prison Monday after threatening to withdraw his guilty plea, according to federal prosecutors.  The plea agreement will spare James Sweeney, 35, a possible death sentence in a separate case in which he was charged with killing a fellow inmate. The former Locust Point resident, who is being held in federal prison in Texas, admitted under the agreement that he was a leader of Dead Man Inc. and that he ordered "hits for hire in order to raise money and also to enable white prisoners to retaliate against black gangs" in Maryland, court records show.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2013
As a federal judge handed down a sentence that will virtually ensure Perry Roark spends the rest of his life behind bars, the founder of Maryland's largest home-grown prison gang renounced his association with the group. Roark, a hulking man known as "Rock," was sentenced to life in a prison Monday for his role in creating Dead Man Inc., an organization of white inmates that prosecutors said has since spread to other states and led to street violence throughout the Baltimore region.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2012
A co-founder of the Dead Man Incorporated prison gang pleaded guilty Wednesday to his role in the group's murder-for-hire and drug-dealing conspiracy — ensuring that the former Baltimorean serves a life sentence even as he promised followers in missives from behind bars that he would continue to defy the government. The plea agreement will spare James Sweeney, 35, a possible death sentence in a separate case in which he is charged with killing a fellow inmate. The former Locust Point resident, who is being held in federal prison in Texas, admitted under the agreement that he was a leader of Dead Man Inc. and that he ordered "hits for hire in order to raise money and also to enable white prisoners to retaliate against black gangs" in Maryland, court records show.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | February 24, 2007
Open letter to Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley: Dear Governor: I don't doubt for a second the sincerity of your motives -- and those of Sen. Lisa Gladden and Del. Samuel I. Rosenberg -- in wanting to end the death penalty in this state. I do, however, question your timing. You, Gladden and Rosenberg might have heard the word going around that gang activity is on the increase in Maryland. Gangs are on our streets and in our prisons. What, you might ask, does that have to do with the death penalty?
NEWS
By Peter Hermann | February 9, 2012
Even burglars get hungry on the job. Annapolis police say that one broke into a home about two blocks off Taylor Avenue north of downtown, and stole food. Maybe the pickings were sparse -- the cops don't say what the burglar passed up: "Burglary - 201200000690 - 700 block of Glenwood St - 02/08 11:30am to 1:10pm: An unknown subject entered an apartment and removed chicken salad and a can of salmon while the resident was away. The door's locking mechanism may have been forced open.
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