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By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2012
A 28-year-old Columbia man sentenced to spend the rest of his life in prison for murdering two people in Howard County in 2007 was found dead and bloodied in his Allegany County prison cell early Thursday morning, according to Maryland State Police. Charles David Richardson IV, who was known as "Face" when he was arrested in May 2007 in the murders of an acquaintance and a 7-Eleven clerk, was found about 5 a.m. under a blanket in his cell bed with trauma to his head, police said. Guards at the North Branch Correctional Institution in Cresaptown rushed into his cell after observing his cellmate "in possession of clothing that appeared to be bloodstained" outside the cell on an upper-level tier, police said.
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NEWS
Dan Rodricks | May 4, 2013
As a teenager in the mid-1990s, he moved with his parents to the United States from Pakistan. The family sought and received political asylum. They settled in Baltimore County and operated a gas station. The boy attended Owings Mills High School. His cricket skills helped him excel at baseball, the quintessential American game. "He always seemed like such a nice young man," said the chair of the English department. The nice young man graduated in 1999. He picked up a job as a data administrator with the Maryland Office of Planning.
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NEWS
September 28, 2012
WEATHER The National Weather Service is calling for Friday to be mostly cloudy, with a high near 80 and a 30 percent chance of showers before 11 a.m. Friday night is expected to be mostly cloudy, with a low around 62. TRAFFIC Check our traffic updates for this morning's issues as you plan your commute. FROM LAST NIGHT Williams' interception return key in Ravens' win : Cornerback Cary Williams' first career interception helped the Ravens turn aside the pesky Browns, 23-16, Thursday nigh tat M&T Bank Stadium.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | November 28, 2012
A 20-year-old prison inmate from Baltimore found severely beaten in his prison cell in Cumberland and transferred to Maryland Shock Trauma Center on Monday has died from his injuries, according to his family and hospital officials. Jerod Pridget, of East Baltimore, was pronounced dead shortly before 1 p.m. Wednesday, said Cordedra Scott, his sister. Cindy Rivers, a Shock Trauma spokeswoman, confirmed Pridget's death. Pridget had been serving an 18-month sentence in the Western Correctional Institution for drug and gun convictions.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | February 2, 1997
Yesterday was declared "Remember the Prisoners Day" at Mount Ararat Baptist Church in West Baltimore, as members of the United Baptist Ministry Convention gathered to call on local churches to help them put a Bible in every prison cell in Maryland."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2010
"The Other Wes Moore" is a book that bridges the gap between Inner Harbor and inner city in the most startling and revelatory ways. The title might suggest the tale of a hidden life. But it's something completely different: the story of two Baltimore men with the same name, roughly similar backgrounds — and wholly opposite journeys. The Wes Moore who was just on "Oprah" became a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of the Johns Hopkins University, a Rhodes scholar, a White House Fellow and an Army officer in Afghanistan, as well as the author of this book.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | November 28, 2012
A 20-year-old prison inmate from Baltimore found severely beaten in his prison cell in Cumberland and transferred to Maryland Shock Trauma Center on Monday has died from his injuries, according to his family and hospital officials. Jerod Pridget, of East Baltimore, was pronounced dead shortly before 1 p.m. Wednesday, said Cordedra Scott, his sister. Cindy Rivers, a Shock Trauma spokeswoman, confirmed Pridget's death. Pridget had been serving an 18-month sentence in the Western Correctional Institution for drug and gun convictions.
NEWS
February 22, 2011
In "Private money, public good" (Feb. 14) Gadi Dechter's discussion of the "social impact bonds" proposed by the Obama administration draws attention to a market-driven solution that may address at least two challenges in the public, or social, sector. First, too many non-profit organizations lack sufficient rigor to be held accountable for results. Second, philanthropists and capital investors need a new framework for engagement in the big social problems of our time, especially in finding solutions to the crisis in public education.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2012
The death of a convicted murderer from Columbia who was found bloodied in his prison cell last month was ruled a homicide by strangulation in an autopsy report, Maryland State Police said Wednesday. Charles David Richardson IV, 28, who was sentenced to spend the rest of his life behind bars for murdering two people in Columbia in 2007, was found under a blanket in his cell bed with trauma to his head on the morning of Sept. 27, police said. Guards at the North Branch Correctional Institution in Cresaptown had rushed into his cell about 5 a.m. after observing his cellmate "in possession of clothing that appeared to be bloodstained" outside the cell on an upper-level tier, police said at the time.
NEWS
By MATTHEW DOLAN and MATTHEW DOLAN,SUN REPORTER | November 29, 2005
Ralph Manna gunned down his ex-wife's friend and shot two more people, and that wasn't enough. He later tried to have his ex-wife and their son killed from his prison cell. But appearing in federal court in Baltimore yesterday to be sentenced for trying to hire a hit man, Manna said he doesn't understand why his family still considers him a pariah. "I'm glad to see you, Barbara and Raymond," he said, turning around to face his ex-wife and their son, now an FBI agent. "I wish Raymond would stop having this grudge for nine years, whatever it is."
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2012
The death of a convicted murderer from Columbia who was found bloodied in his prison cell last month was ruled a homicide by strangulation in an autopsy report, Maryland State Police said Wednesday. Charles David Richardson IV, 28, who was sentenced to spend the rest of his life behind bars for murdering two people in Columbia in 2007, was found under a blanket in his cell bed with trauma to his head on the morning of Sept. 27, police said. Guards at the North Branch Correctional Institution in Cresaptown had rushed into his cell about 5 a.m. after observing his cellmate "in possession of clothing that appeared to be bloodstained" outside the cell on an upper-level tier, police said at the time.
NEWS
September 28, 2012
WEATHER The National Weather Service is calling for Friday to be mostly cloudy, with a high near 80 and a 30 percent chance of showers before 11 a.m. Friday night is expected to be mostly cloudy, with a low around 62. TRAFFIC Check our traffic updates for this morning's issues as you plan your commute. FROM LAST NIGHT Williams' interception return key in Ravens' win : Cornerback Cary Williams' first career interception helped the Ravens turn aside the pesky Browns, 23-16, Thursday nigh tat M&T Bank Stadium.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2012
A 28-year-old Columbia man sentenced to spend the rest of his life in prison for murdering two people in Howard County in 2007 was found dead and bloodied in his Allegany County prison cell early Thursday morning, according to Maryland State Police. Charles David Richardson IV, who was known as "Face" when he was arrested in May 2007 in the murders of an acquaintance and a 7-Eleven clerk, was found about 5 a.m. under a blanket in his cell bed with trauma to his head, police said. Guards at the North Branch Correctional Institution in Cresaptown rushed into his cell after observing his cellmate "in possession of clothing that appeared to be bloodstained" outside the cell on an upper-level tier, police said.
NEWS
October 21, 2011
There is no doubt John Wagner, the man convicted of murdering Johns Hopkins researcher Stephen Pitcairn in Baltimore last year, shouldn't have been on the streets that day. Mr. Wagner had a long history of violent crimes and should already have been behind bars. The Baltimore City judge who sentenced him to life plus 20 years Friday made sure he won't soon be free to kill again, and the fact that Mr. Wagner will likely spend the rest of his days in a prison cell provides a measure of justice for the victim's family and friends.
NEWS
By Reginald Dwayne Betts | August 8, 2011
For as long as the history of prisons in America, there has been rape in prisons in America. There, too, have been children locked in prison cells with adults. Young men — boys, really — turned into tools for the sexual satisfaction of the older, the stronger. We turn away from it in part because our penitentiaries are the last remnants of Darwinian survival of the fittest, played out on a day-to-day basis. And it is difficult to feel compassion for criminals. This is why prison movies like "Blood in Blood Out," "American Me" and "Shawshank Redemption" feature graphic rapes and yet did not lead to any public outcries about prison conditions.
NEWS
February 22, 2011
In "Private money, public good" (Feb. 14) Gadi Dechter's discussion of the "social impact bonds" proposed by the Obama administration draws attention to a market-driven solution that may address at least two challenges in the public, or social, sector. First, too many non-profit organizations lack sufficient rigor to be held accountable for results. Second, philanthropists and capital investors need a new framework for engagement in the big social problems of our time, especially in finding solutions to the crisis in public education.
NEWS
October 21, 2011
There is no doubt John Wagner, the man convicted of murdering Johns Hopkins researcher Stephen Pitcairn in Baltimore last year, shouldn't have been on the streets that day. Mr. Wagner had a long history of violent crimes and should already have been behind bars. The Baltimore City judge who sentenced him to life plus 20 years Friday made sure he won't soon be free to kill again, and the fact that Mr. Wagner will likely spend the rest of his days in a prison cell provides a measure of justice for the victim's family and friends.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2010
"The Other Wes Moore" is a book that bridges the gap between Inner Harbor and inner city in the most startling and revelatory ways. The title might suggest the tale of a hidden life. But it's something completely different: the story of two Baltimore men with the same name, roughly similar backgrounds — and wholly opposite journeys. The Wes Moore who was just on "Oprah" became a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of the Johns Hopkins University, a Rhodes scholar, a White House Fellow and an Army officer in Afghanistan, as well as the author of this book.
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