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NEWS
March 27, 2012
John Merzbacher was sentenced to four life sentences for the horrific rape of a young girl ("Supreme Court decisions renew interest in petition fighting convicted child rapist's release," March 22). The recent Supreme Court ruling does not offer an automatic end to his sentence because of insufficient legal counsel about a plea agreement. State and local officials must consider the seriousness of his crimes and keep him in prison. Beyond the rapes of which he was found guilty, there are many untold stories about the vast extent of his abuse of young people.
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NEWS
By Hal Riedl | July 20, 2014
Back when Robert Ehrlich was governor of Maryland, I was interviewing men newly committed to state prison and suspected of gang affiliations. After years in denial, Maryland was just beginning to realize that gangs were very active behind the walls. Among them was a "new" incarnation of BGF (Black Guerrilla Family) that had taken its name from, but was not otherwise beholden to, the BGF that dated from the 1960s. I got to know Lt. Santiago Morales, an astute gang investigator at Baltimore City Detention Center, and we shared information.
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NEWS
March 21, 2013
The letter "Obama should pardon Pollard" (March 18) could not be more wrong when it urges President Barack Obama to pardon the heinous traitor Jonathan Pollard, who is serving a life sentence for causing more harm to U.S. intelligence than any spy had in decades. The writer also has her priorities backward when she says that President Obama needs to "...mend some political fences with Israel and to promote warmer relations with Israeli leaders. " The U.S. gives Israel $3 billion and more every year in military aid, our latest military technology and diplomatic cover at the U.N. for its atrocities against the Palestinians.
NEWS
July 17, 2014
Your editorial, "Breaking a vicious cycle" (July 14) hits the nail on the head. With U.S. youth incarceration rates the highest in the world - greater than the rates of the other 10 most developed countries combined - something is tragically wrong. It is disturbing that once incarcerated as a youth, even for less serious offenses, these individuals have an increased likelihood of returning to prison and a decreased chance of securing gainful employment later in life. As you point out, the Youth PROMISE Act offers a more effective approach to juvenile crime.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann | March 12, 2012
Two city drug dealers have been sentenced to prison in separate cases, including one who police said dealt cocaine in a small neighborhood in Northeast Baltimore called the 4X4, according to federal prosecutors. In that case, the Maryland U.S. Attorney's Office said that 30-year-old Tony Robinson, known by "Peterman" and "Pete," was part of a drug group from June 2009 through August 2010 in the area between Edison Highway and Belair Road. Prosecutors said that Robinson pleaded guilty in the case in which he sold 280 grams of cocaine and 5 kilograms of powder cocaine.
NEWS
April 2, 2010
A federal judge in Baltimore has dismissed a lawsuit filed by eight state prison workers who claimed a strip search for drugs violated their constitutional rights. The plaintiffs' lawyer said he expects to appeal the opinion entered Thursday by U.S. District Judge J. Frederick Motz. The employees were searched after a drug-sniffing machine falsely signaled they were carrying drugs at the medium-security Maryland Correctional Training Center near Hagerstown in August 2008. The court found that there is no clearly established law regarding the level of suspicion raised by such alerts.
BUSINESS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2014
Anthony Mayes was nearing age 50 when he got the first suit he ever owned, a dark gray Armani, and it seemed life, at last, would be better. He'd just been released from his latest time behind bars, making it about 22 years of his life total, for an array of charges including drugs and armed robbery. He said he's determined to make his most recent six-month stint his last, and sees the clothes - suit, shirt, tie, dress shoes - as part of that effort. "They make me feel important, like I can succeed," said Mayes, 49, who believes he's been given "an opportunity to redeem myself.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | November 30, 2011
- Nearly 40 years have come and gone since Calvin Ash, a hospital kitchen worker, committed his one and only crime: At the age of 21, he shot to death his estranged wife's boyfriend. A Baltimore judge found him guilty and sentenced him to life in prison in 1972. Under the conditions of his sentence, Mr. Ash would one distant day be eligible for parole. Thirty-two years later, in 2004, the Maryland Parole Commission considered and approved Mr. Ash for release. But there was a catch: In Maryland, the governor can reject the commission's recommendations and, unfortunately for Mr. Ash, his case did not reach the governor's desk until after Martin O'Malley had been elected, in 2006.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2013
For years after he took his last hit, Sammy Stewart dreamed the same dream. He'd climb a set of stairs under a dogwood tree, and at the top, a man would hand him some rocks of crack cocaine. Stewart would take them home and place them by his bedside as he prepared his tinfoil for smoking, a ritual he'd performed thousands of times. Just as he was ready to fire up, the prison loudspeaker would interject, blaring, "Chow time! Chow time!" He'd wake and spend the whole day angry.
NEWS
April 16, 2010
Two men and a woman have been convicted of being part of a violent drug gang that was run out of a Western Maryland prison. A federal jury convicted 23-year-old Tavon Mouzone and 24-year-old Anthony Fleming of racketeering conspiracy on Thursday. Their co-defendant, 25-year-old Michelle Hebron, pleaded guilty to the same charge on the second day of their trial. Among the acts Hebron admitted to was the 2007 shooting death of David Moore in Hagerstown. Prosecutors described Hebron as a high-ranking female member of the Tree Top Piru Bloods gang.
NEWS
By Emad Hassan | July 15, 2014
I have been locked up at Guantanamo Bay for 12 years, held without charge or trial. I've done nothing wrong; in 2009, I was unanimously cleared for release by six different branches of the U.S. government, including the FBI and the CIA. Yet here I am, still detained. I write this 106 years after the birth of Thurgood Marshall, a Baltimore-born civil rights lawyer and later a Supreme Court justice who helped end segregation in America. Marshall understood and respected the humanity and innate equality of all people.
NEWS
July 11, 2014
For far too many young people who get caught up in the criminal justice system, an arrest or conviction for even a minor, non-violent offense can become a one-way ticket to a shrunken future that slams the door on opportunities for the rest of their lives. Being arrested as a teen increases a person's chances of being arrested again as an adult, and teenagers sentenced to jail are more likely to be incarcerated later in life as well. Add to that the nation's harsh drug laws and stiff mandatory minimum sentencing policies and it's no wonder America locks up more of its citizens than any other country in the world.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2014
A little-noticed and highly technical Supreme Court decision is opening the way for dozens of federal inmates from Maryland to seek reduced sentences — even though trial judges found they had violent criminal pasts. For some, the high court decision has already meant that sentences of 15 years and more have been cut substantially. One inmate, for example, saw his sentence reduced from 15 years to about six years; he was released in February. The legal challenges are the latest turn in an ongoing debate over the fairness of long federal prison sentences — a weapon frequently used in Baltimore to combat crime.
NEWS
June 4, 2014
At last, some outrage from Congress over this imperial president's unilateral actions ( "Ruppersberger: Bergdahl decision sets 'dangerous precedent,'" June 2). Imagine releasing five of the worst criminals from Guantanamo. These are terrorists whose whole purpose is to kill Americans! Now, we find out that U.S. Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl might have actually been a deserter. This man does not deserve to be president of the United States. We have "1984," "Animal Farm" and "The Manchurian Candidate" rolled into one in this administration.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2014
Baltimore's notorious "dine and dasher," accused of repeatedly faking seizures to get out of paying restaurant tabs, got a hefty bill on Friday from a city judge: five years in prison. Andrew Palmer, 47, has been eating and drinking for free around town for years. He became known by police and paramedics for feigning medical emergencies when his checks were due, and restaurant owners began posting his picture on their walls. Police have locked him up and he has been convicted dozens of times, but the maximum penalty for the charge of theft under $100 carries a maximum penalty of a few weeks in jail, which he repeatedly received and served.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | May 22, 2014
A Pennsylvania man will spend seven years in prison for stealing tons of steel materials from a Bel Air construction site over a period of several months during 2011, the Harford County State's Attorney's Office said. John Michael Schene, 49, of York, was sentenced Tuesday in Harford County Circuit Court and will serve his prison term in the Maryland Division of Corrections, State's Attorney Joseph Cassilly said in a news release. According to the release, Schene confessed to entering the yard of Lee Foundation Company's job site at a sewage pumping station in Bel Air on at least eight to 10 occasions and stealing approximately 25,000 pounds of steel concrete reinforcing bars, steel concrete form parts and various pieces of miscellaneous steel slated for use in building a foundation for the pumping station.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan | nick.madigan@baltsun.com | December 16, 2009
A Baltimore County Circuit Court judge sentenced a 41-year-old man to life in prison Tuesday for the first-degree murder of a Rosedale woman whom he struck with a pickup truck. Jose Manuel Claros, who was convicted in October, did not admit to the crime at his sentencing. Instead, he blamed his victim and all but called her a liar. Gloria Elsy Torres-Restrepo, 39, died Jan. 5 after Claros struck her with her own pickup truck after she had expressed her intent to end their business and personal relationship, take back the truck from him and evict him from a house she owned in Rosedale.
NEWS
April 3, 2012
The recent rulings by theU.S. Supreme Courtregarding habeas corpus relief for certain inmates have caused grave concerns and anxiety for the courageous survivors of John Merzbacher, as indicated by the many victims who have contacted us over the past several days. During my four-plus years as archbishop of Baltimore, I had the privilege of meeting with several of John Merzbacher's victims and their families, who recounted for me their tragic and painful abuse. It is clear to me that the abuse they suffered has had an enormous impact on their lives and the lives of their families, and I fear that they will suffer anew if Mr. Merzbacher's request to be released is granted.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2014
Dressed in a maroon jail outfit and limping into court with the help of a cane, Nathan Barksdale did not look Wednesday like the notorious heroin dealer once sentenced to 15 years in prison for the torture of three people in a West Baltimore public housing development. As he sat at the defense table, Barksdale waved to two women who walked into the room. One blew a kiss before they sat down. It was light moment for the aging criminal before a federal judge would send him back to prison for the next few years.
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2014
Convicted double murderer John Booth-El died in prison over the weekend, but a thorny debate outlived him: What should happen to the four other death-row inmates in legal limbo after the repeal of Maryland's capital punishment law? Booth-El's death, which authorities said appeared to be from natural causes, rekindled debate over whether the inmates - all convicted of murder and sentenced years ago - should have their terms commuted to reflect the state's new attitude toward the death penalty.
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