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NEWS
By Rona S. Hirsch and Rona S. Hirsch,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 7, 2003
The talk was typical of most weight loss programs - calorie counting, sugar addiction and the tastiness of flavorless rice cakes. Successful dieters offered testimonials, and before and after photographs were displayed. But during the orientation of the PRISM weight loss program Tuesday evening at Columbia's Wilde Lake Interfaith Center, the 18 participants also discussed one distinguishing nuance: PRISM is a Christian-oriented national weight loss program founded in 1990 by three women.
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SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2012
There is no Red Sox- or Cubs-style curse on the Orioles - nothing involving Babe Ruth, “No, No, Nanette” or a malodorous goat. At least not that I know of. But we all know the Orioles haven't won since 1997. That sure was an eventful season for the franchise. The O's went wire-to-wire, winning the AL East and advancing to the ALCS before falling short of the World Series. Manager Davey Johnson and owner Peter Angelos had a stunning baseball divorce after the season was over, and Johnson stepped down before completing his third and final contract season.
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NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | May 5, 2002
The central character in Jonathon Scott Fuqua's new book, Darby (Candlewick, $15.99), emerged from the fertile and tormented land of rural South Carolina. Like the protagonist in his first book, The Reappearance of Sam Webber, Darby Carmichael learns a lot about who she is through the prism of race. She's a spunky 9-year-old who lives on a farm in Marlboro County, circa 1926. Her best friend, Evette, the precocious daughter of a black tenant farmer, understands the social limits of their relationship better than Darby.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Andrea K. Walker and Jamie Smith Hopkins and Andrea K. Walker,jamie.smith.hopkins@baltsun.com and Andrea.Walker@baltsun.com | January 22, 2010
Maryland regulators, after receiving a slew of consumer questions in the wake of a major debt collector's collapse, have sent letters to every collection agency operating in the state to try to connect anxious debtors with the companies they owe. Rockville-based Mann Bracken, which abruptly shut its doors after the recent bankruptcy of a spinoff company that handled its nonlegal work, used to collect payments from consumers on behalf of firms...
SPORTS
September 5, 1993
Pacific Trading Cards is moving its NFL series upscale to premium. The 440-card set will be limited to 5,000 cases. There will also be two insert sets -- 25 gold-foil cards featuring top players and 20 "Prism" cards featuring veterans and rookies. Cards come 12 to a pack.
SPORTS
August 15, 1993
Pacific Trading Cards' Spanish-language baseball set has been expanded with a 330-card second series. Included are 22 members each of the expansion Florida Marlins and Colorado Rockies. There are two insert sets, 36 "prism" cards (shown is the Orioles' Sherman Obando) and 20 Baseball Amigos (multiple players on each card).
SPORTS
December 31, 1991
Tarkanian sues NCAA for alleged vendettaUNLV coach Jerry Tarkanian filed a counterclaim against the NCAA yesterday, accusing the agency of "enforcement atrocities' in a 20-year vendetta to drive him from college coaching.The 77-page action is in response to an NCAA lawsuit filed in November that seeks to overturn Nevada's due pocess law. The due process case is scheduled for trial next month in U.S. District Court."The fact of the matter is the NCAA is an organization that's out of control," said Santa Ana, Calif.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2001
Module helps gamers get on fast track to Pokemon mastery If you got that cool new Gold or Silver version of "Pokemon" over the holidays, you may find yourself getting stuck at some parts of the game. No fear: Just take $29.95 of your Christmas money to buy the MonsterBrain Pokemon Editor by Pelican Accessories. You operate it by sticking your Pokemon game into a slot on the module, which itself is inserted into your Game Boy Color or Game Boy Pocket. With the MonsterBrain, you don't have to go to the Internet to search down codes for getting past trouble spots.
NEWS
By Patrick Hickerson and Patrick Hickerson,Staff writer | November 25, 1990
Prism - a new literary magazine devoted to writers and artists of the Central Maryland counties of Howard, Baltimore and Carroll -- will be found in college and independent bookstores by the spring, according to Patapsco River Publications.The glossy-cover magazine -- approximately 80 pages in length -- will focus on short fiction, non-fiction, poetry, photography and art work from writers and artists who work or live in the tri-county area.D. Scott Swain -- a member of Patapsco River Publications' board of directors and a contributor to Carroll County Community College's student publications -- said that a perusal of Maryland Writer's Manual confirmed what he had guessed for some time: The area had no magazine that promoted the literary and visual arts.
NEWS
By Michael Pakenham | June 9, 1996
"Waking From The Dream: My Life in the Black Middle Class," by Sam Fulwood III (Anchor. 247 pages. $23.95). Fulwood is a Washington correspondent for the Los Angeles Times who at one time worked at The Sun as a reporter, editorial writer and South Africa correspondent. This book is the story of his progression from a happy, secure childhood in a segregated North Carolina to ostensible integration in American national newspapering, where he is an accomplished and respected professional. That story, inevitably, is recounted through the prism of race.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,special to the sun | May 18, 2007
Prince George's Little Theatre showed courage in tackling The Importance of Being Earnest, which requires at least three settings for each act, a large costume wardrobe befitting Victorian gentry and a gifted cast to deliver Oscar Wilde's century-old dialogue. In this work, the great Irish poet and dramatist ridicules the pretentiousness of the British aristocracy. Tired of his country home, Jack Worthing arrives in London assuming the identity of a fictitious pleasure-seeking brother, Ernest.
NEWS
By SHIBLEY TELHAMI | May 14, 2006
WASHINGTON -- When Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad sent an 18-page letter to President Bush - the first such communication between leaders of the two countries since the 1979 Iranian revolution - the United States was only one of the intended audiences. It has been clear for some time that Iran sees a significant international audience, especially in the Muslim world, where it seeks to exploit prevalent resentment of U.S. foreign policy. The positive popular reception that Mr. Ahmadinejad received in his visit to Indonesia is just one indication.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Christopher Corbett and Christopher Corbett,Special to the Sun | February 27, 2005
Winslow In Love By Kevin Canty. Nan A. Talese / Doubleday. 292 pages. $23.95. The drunken poet in sad decline is a stock figure in fiction (usually cruelly comic) and nowhere more so than in the little novel of academic life. We have been here before. But Kevin Canty's new novel, Winslow In Love, is not a predictable tale of goatish pedagogues or schoolmaster's high jinx. And it is never funny. From the first page of this grim story -- think Raymond Carver -- a terrible sense of dread looms, from the rainy streets of the Pacific Northwest and the seedy bar in which the book opens to the remote college in Montana where Richard Winslow, an alcoholic poet desperate for dollars, washes ashore for a semester to teach Rilke to the impressionable and go fly-fishing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Maria Blackburn and By Maria Blackburn,Sun Staff | June 8, 2003
The Photograph, by Penelope Lively. Viking, 240 pages, $24.95. While shuffling through some old papers one day, landscape historian Glyn Peters discovers an envelope marked "DON'T OPEN -- DESTROY." He ignores the warning and tears opens the envelope only to find a photograph of his now deceased wife, Kath, hand in hand with her sister's husband, Nick. A note in Nick's handwriting accompanies the photograph. "I can't resist sending you this. Negative destroyed, I'm told. Blessings, my love."
NEWS
By Rona S. Hirsch and Rona S. Hirsch,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 7, 2003
The talk was typical of most weight loss programs - calorie counting, sugar addiction and the tastiness of flavorless rice cakes. Successful dieters offered testimonials, and before and after photographs were displayed. But during the orientation of the PRISM weight loss program Tuesday evening at Columbia's Wilde Lake Interfaith Center, the 18 participants also discussed one distinguishing nuance: PRISM is a Christian-oriented national weight loss program founded in 1990 by three women.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 24, 2003
SEOUL, South Korea - Some of Soe Kee Beom's opinions about the United States and North Korea are exactly what members of his parents' generation are tired of reading as proof of a new pro-North, anti-United States sentiment in the South. "We should not consider North Korea an enemy," said Soe, 30, a Web designer, speaking with friends one recent evening at a popular restaurant in southern Seoul. "One of us has to be able to forgive the other brother and embrace him. "In the last two years, my feelings toward reunification have grown stronger while my dislike for the U.S. has grown stronger," he said.
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | October 7, 1996
Two people were killed and third severely injured when a car traveling east in the westbound lanes of Interstate 70 early yesterday struck another car head-on, state police said.The wreck occurred about 3 a.m. a mile or so west of Route 32 in West Friendship in Howard County when Arthur James, 61, of the 9700 block of Branch Leigh Road in Randallstown drove his 1995 Lincoln Town Car in the wrong direction and struck a 1990 Geo Prism heading west, according to Cpl. Michael Powell of the state police barracks in Waterloo.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,SUN STAFF | November 2, 1997
Julian Della Puppa used to be afraid of crickets and ants.Now they don't faze the 5-year-old.His mother credits the Maryland Science Center and its Saturday children's workshops with shoring up her son's bravery. He is one of nearly 1,000 youngsters registered for this fall's PRISM -- Programs to Raise Interest in Science and Mathematics -- sessions for pre-kindergartners through eighth-graders.Geared to specific grade levels, the two-hour sessions at the center focus on a different topic each week.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Canfield and Kevin Canfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 15, 2002
Paul Schrader's new film Auto Focus tells the story of Bob Crane, the 1960s TV actor whose star dimmed rapidly as he descended into a netherworld of indiscriminate sex and homemade pornography. Crane's is a fascinating tale, that of a seemingly average middle American who traded his family sedan and suburban comforts, his starring role on Hogan's Heroes, for a life that ended with his murder in a motel room in 1978. For Schrader, though, Crane is a means to an end; his life story enables the director to make a series of points about male sexuality and, more broadly, American morality.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 31, 2002
Any good production of Oscar Wilde's 1895 masterpiece,The Importance of Being Earnest, exemplifies the joys of play-acting. The comedy's hero, Jack, makes up a rapscallion brother called Ernest to escape his country obligations and lark about the city - where, as Ernest, he wins the devotion of fair Gwendolen. In the country, Jack's best friend Algernon poses as Ernest in order to woo Jack's ward, Cecily, who has fallen in love with "Ernest" from afar. When London-based Gwendolen and Lady Bracknell (Algernon's cousin and aunt)
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