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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | December 4, 1991
Printmaking is alive and well, and so is abstraction, in the Maryland Institute's latest show, "Collector's Choice: A Selection from Bob Blackburn's Printmaking Workshop."Blackburn, a member of the Institute faculty and a printmaker himself, has a workshop in New York. The show has been selected from his collection of the prints made there by a number of artists, and his taste tends toward abstraction.Among the artists, we will all recognize Grace Hartigan, whose lithograph "Butterfly Woman" has her characteristic dynamic energy, fluid line, color sense and vivid imagery.
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By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2014
In one print, the silos at Millersville's Kinder Farm Park are represented in countless tiny dots in shades of gray. Across the hallway, the Bay Bridge is silhouetted against a sky with blazing colors of red, orange and yellow. And upstairs, foreboding blue storm clouds gather over the water. Dozens of prints of all types - lithographs, woodcuts, etchings - cover the walls of the Willow Gallery at Quiet Waters Park in Annapolis, the latest show from the busy artists in Anne Arundel Community College's printmaking club.
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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | April 16, 1998
In the 1960s, when Jim Dine first became famous as an artist, he was misunderstood, and the misunderstanding has lasted in some people's minds right down to the present.His imagery of everyday objects was the cause. A Dine picture might be of a man's tie, or a robe, or a bathroom fixture. So critics linked him with the pop artists, who also pictured the everyday, whether it was Andy Warhol's Brillo boxes or Claes Oldenburg's baked potatoes or Roy Lichtenstein's comic-strip characters.But Dine always protested that he was never a pop artist, and his work bears him out. His painterly images never looked impersonal and mass-produced, and whatever he depicted he endowed with too much beauty and emotional content for his work to be one with the ironic, deadpan images of the pop artists.
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By Mike Giuliano | November 3, 2011
Sometimes a single image just won't do. Printmakers often work in a series, enabling them to literally explore variations with their subject matter and technique. The Baltimore Museum of Art exhibit "Print By Print: Series from Durer to Lichtenstein" showcases such print series done between the 15th century and the present day. Whether lined up along the wall or arranged in grids, the 300 exhibited prints will keep your eyes moving along. The serial format is especially appropriate for printmakers who are visually interpreting Biblical or other literary source material.
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By Janet Gilbert | February 2, 2007
Columbia artist Aline Feldman is always looking ahead - as well as up, down, and sideways. "I think we experience life that way - from multiple perspectives," she said. Feldman, 78, brought out her print, Angle of Change. The print has six separate yet cohesive images, and it can be appreciated top to bottom, side to side - even "around," in a circular manner. Feldman blended traditional Japanese woodcut printmaking methods with the American "whiteline" technique developed by a group of printmaking artists in Provincetown, Mass.
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By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | May 6, 2002
In this fast-paced electronic age with its computer-generated visuals, Shawn M. Lockhart prints words and images following an arduous tradition that dates to the Middle Ages. Lockhart's technique has her carving in reverse on wood blocks, or on softer linoleum "when my hands complain," she said. She then soaks the engraving in ink and prints it on heavy paper - replicating the process used centuries before the invention of the printing press. Now with 30 years' experience in what is today a rarely used form of printmaking, Lockhart is taking her craft to Ireland.
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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | June 9, 1998
Late last summer Martha Macks, president of Goya Girl Press printmaking atelier, had the idea of inviting nine sculptors to make prints. The result is the current show, "Prints and Sculptures," containing prints and sculptures by each of the artists.It was an intriguing idea that has turned into a mostly successful show. By and large the artists --some of whom had never made prints before -- worked well in the printmaking discipline and created works that relate in some degree to their sculpture.
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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | March 19, 2004
Since at least Rembrandt's time, people have prized the fine prints of great artists nearly as much as their paintings, drawings and sculpture. More affordable, and therefore more accessible, printmaking allowed artists to reach out to audiences who might otherwise never get a chance to see their works. At the same time, printmaking let artists experiment with their materials in ways that would be impractical in any other media. So it's not surprising that Robert Mangold, a contemporary master who was a pioneer in the development of minimalism and conceptual art during the 1960s, is today as involved with printmaking as he is in creating the rigorously precise geometric paintings for which he is famous.
NEWS
December 27, 2009
The Howard County Arts Council is looking for teachers to fill positions in its visual and performing arts summer camps next year. Among the subjects offered in the camps are painting, drawing, printmaking, sculpture, dance, musical theater, poetry and creative writing. Camps are open to students in grades K-7. Interested teachers should contact Wendy Meetze at 410-313-2787.
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By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 7, 1999
Plenty of emotion will be on display at the Mitchell Gallery at St. John's College in the coming weeks as the museum exhibits 45 illustrations by the French artist, Georges Rouault (1871-1958).Rouault was an expressionist, an artist who abandoned traditional forms in favor of distorted shapes and colors designed to express visceral feelings and emotions.Rouault left school in his early teens and worked as an apprentice in a stained-glass workshop.The illustrations in the exhibition, on loan from the Syracuse University art collection, demonstrate that the darkly highlighted outlines and vibrant colors Rouault encountered as a young glass-maker never left his work.
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By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman | January 31, 2010
Philagrafika 2010: International Print Festival Where: : Various venues in Philadelphia When: : Through April 11 What: : Philagrafika 2010 is a new international festival that celebrates the role of printmaking in contemporary art. It showcases the work of about 300 artists at more than 80 venues throughout the city. The festival is divided into three components: a core curated exhibition titled "The Graphic Unconscious," "Out of Print"- artist projects based on historic collections, and Independent Projects.
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By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 29, 2010
Philagrafika 2010:International Print Festival Where: Various venues in Philadelphia When: Through April 11 What: Philagrafika 2010 is a new international festival that celebrates the role of printmaking in contemporary art. It showcases the work of about 300 artists at more than 80 venues throughout the city. The festival is divided into three components: a core curated exhibition titled "The Graphic Unconscious," "Out of Print"— artist projects based on historic collections, and Independent Projects.
NEWS
December 27, 2009
The Howard County Arts Council is looking for teachers to fill positions in its visual and performing arts summer camps next year. Among the subjects offered in the camps are painting, drawing, printmaking, sculpture, dance, musical theater, poetry and creative writing. Camps are open to students in grades K-7. Interested teachers should contact Wendy Meetze at 410-313-2787.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | October 25, 2009
For Henri Matisse, the object of drawing was not to display technical dexterity, but "to give simplicity and spontaneity to the expression, which should speak without clumsiness, directly to the mind of the spectator." His successful realization of that goal can be richly appreciated in the Baltimore Museum of Art's new exhibit "Matisse as Printmaker." The show focuses on a relatively unexplored side of the artist's legacy - from his first, quite traditional self-portraits to examples of Matisse's bold last works in the print genre, when just a few, thick black lines sufficed.
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By Janet Gilbert | February 2, 2007
Columbia artist Aline Feldman is always looking ahead - as well as up, down, and sideways. "I think we experience life that way - from multiple perspectives," she said. Feldman, 78, brought out her print, Angle of Change. The print has six separate yet cohesive images, and it can be appreciated top to bottom, side to side - even "around," in a circular manner. Feldman blended traditional Japanese woodcut printmaking methods with the American "whiteline" technique developed by a group of printmaking artists in Provincetown, Mass.
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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | April 24, 2004
Master printmaker, scholar and educator Donald Saff made a career of collaborating with some of the most famous artists of his time. His prints of their works became famous for their quality and the originality of their execution. Robert Rauschenberg, Roy Lichtenstein, Jim Dine, James Turrell and William Rosenquist are a few of the art-world superstars whom Saff helped to create fine arts prints and multiples - many of which he eventually acquired for his own collection. Now Saff, 66, is giving some of the treasures he helped create to the Johns Hopkins University's Bloomberg School of Public Health.
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By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | June 9, 2000
With poems, prints and painting, Shawn M. Lockhart shows off her talents at a solo exhibit opening tomorrow at the Carroll County Arts Council gallery in Westminster. Many in the local arts community know Lockhart, who signs her work "Mara," for her stark black-and-white prints. But, the exhibit will show she is branching out. For nearly 30 years, Lockhart has called herself a printmaker, an artist who carves original designs into wood and transfers them to paper. Each print is one of a kind.
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By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman | January 31, 2010
Philagrafika 2010: International Print Festival Where: : Various venues in Philadelphia When: : Through April 11 What: : Philagrafika 2010 is a new international festival that celebrates the role of printmaking in contemporary art. It showcases the work of about 300 artists at more than 80 venues throughout the city. The festival is divided into three components: a core curated exhibition titled "The Graphic Unconscious," "Out of Print"- artist projects based on historic collections, and Independent Projects.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | March 19, 2004
Since at least Rembrandt's time, people have prized the fine prints of great artists nearly as much as their paintings, drawings and sculpture. More affordable, and therefore more accessible, printmaking allowed artists to reach out to audiences who might otherwise never get a chance to see their works. At the same time, printmaking let artists experiment with their materials in ways that would be impractical in any other media. So it's not surprising that Robert Mangold, a contemporary master who was a pioneer in the development of minimalism and conceptual art during the 1960s, is today as involved with printmaking as he is in creating the rigorously precise geometric paintings for which he is famous.
NEWS
February 27, 2004
Jazz ensemble performs Sunday at community college The Carroll Community College Jazz Ensemble will perform at 3 p.m. Sunday in the Scott Center theater at the college's 1601 Washington Road campus. The 19-piece ensemble, made up of students and two community members, will perform a variety of jazz music, including big band swing, contemporary rock and fusion, Latin and ballads. The ensemble is directed by music instructor Bo Eckard. The concert is free. Information: 410-386-8153. McDaniel to stage `Hay Fever' next week The theatre arts department at McDaniel College will present Hay Fever, Noel Coward's comedy of manners, at 8 p.m. daily from Wednesday to March 6 in Alumni Hall.
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