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Gus G. Sentementes | March 12, 2012
Ever heard of conductive inks ? They are a hot little product right now as such inks can be incorporated in circuits that can literally be printed on a printing press. The process generally goes like this: buy a can of conductive ink, pour into an inkjet printer or printing press, and print electrical circuits (and even solar cells) on sturdy paper. This is one application that intrigued me as I reported a story on Vorbeck Materials , a Jessup, Md.-based manufacturer that is developing different products with graphene, including a new lithium ion battery for electric cars.
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BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | March 12, 2012
Ever heard of conductive inks ? They are a hot little product right now as such inks can be incorporated in circuits that can literally be printed on a printing press. The process generally goes like this: buy a can of conductive ink, pour into an inkjet printer or printing press, and print electrical circuits (and even solar cells) on sturdy paper. This is one application that intrigued me as I reported a story on Vorbeck Materials , a Jessup, Md.-based manufacturer that is developing different products with graphene, including a new lithium ion battery for electric cars.
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NEWS
October 21, 2005
Richard Hillman, a retired printing press mechanic and missionary, died of cancer Sunday at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center. The Essex resident was 75. Mr. Hillman was born in New York City and raised in Catonsville, Silver Spring and Washington, where he graduated in 1948 from Alexander Graham Bell Vocational School. From 1951 to 1953, he served in the Navy as an engine man in ships' engine rooms. In 1954, he established his business, which specialized in repairing offset printing presses.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | October 19, 2009
So we may soon have ourselves a conservative Bible. Besides Fox News, I mean. This new Bible is from Conservapedia, a Web site that bills itself as a conservative alternative to the perceived liberal bias of Wikipedia, the user-edited online reference. You may judge Conservapedia's own bias by reading its definition of liberal: "someone who rejects logical and biblical standards, often for self-centered reasons. There are no coherent liberal standards; often a liberal is merely someone who craves attention, and who uses many words to say nothing."
NEWS
By Kelly Gilbert and Kelly Gilbert,Evening Sun Staff | January 17, 1992
By the time a Secret Service agent dove into the cold water at Liberty Dam on Thanksgiving weekend, most of the suspects in a $1.2 million counterfeiting case had been arrested and charged.The diver found $90,000 in counterfeit $20 bills in a plastic bag weighted down with rocks in the deep water next to the dam, and retrieved another bag containing the printing plates used to make the bogus bills.That evidence, which corroborated the stories cooperators had told, was icing on the cake."There were high-fives all around," said Assistant U.S. Attorney Maury Epner.
NEWS
By Angela Gambill and Angela Gambill,Staff writer | December 31, 1991
Genghis Khan isn't anybody's patron saint. But to Severna Park author David McCallum, the emperor of China ought to be.In his revisionist history, which McCallum has written with a Chinese researcher, he tells the "other" story of the man known as the scourge of the East, the feared Khan who in the 13th century conquered nearly the entireknown civilized world."
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Sun Staff | September 18, 2005
The Sun has christened its new type font Mencken, in honor of its columnist, editor and occasional torturer. Henry Louis Mencken was born 125 years ago on Sept. 12, 1880, in a little West Lexington Street rowhouse. He was the son of a cigar-making father who traded near the stage door of today's Hippodrome theater. Mencken was seven years old in 1887 when his father presented him with a small printing press and font of type on Christmas morning. Like a proud parent who wants to demonstrate a thoughtful gift, he attempted to get the press going.
NEWS
November 20, 1990
POLICE CAPTURE suspect in robberyPolice arrested a 30-year-old county man and charged him with robbing the High's Dairy store in Odenton Saturday, county police reported.Police said a man entered the store on Route 170 at 8:50 p.m. and brought a few items to the counter. When the cashier began ringing the items up, the robber passed him a note demanding money.The clerk put the money and the items in a bag and the robber left the store.Police later arrested Randy Lynn Agnor, of the 1400 block Annapolis Road, and charged him with armed robbery.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,Sun reporter | September 28, 2007
Anne Catharine Green gave birth to 14 children and raised the six surviving ones with her husband in Colonial Annapolis before his untimely death thrust her into an unlikely new role: America's first female newspaper publisher. She allowed no interruption of the printing of his paper, the Maryland Gazette, announcing on the front page after his passing in 1767, according to the state archives, that she "shall venture to supply [customers] with News-Papers, on the same Terms he did." After getting complaints from William Paca about anonymous letters to the editor directed at him, she began requiring submissions to have names attached.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | October 19, 2009
So we may soon have ourselves a conservative Bible. Besides Fox News, I mean. This new Bible is from Conservapedia, a Web site that bills itself as a conservative alternative to the perceived liberal bias of Wikipedia, the user-edited online reference. You may judge Conservapedia's own bias by reading its definition of liberal: "someone who rejects logical and biblical standards, often for self-centered reasons. There are no coherent liberal standards; often a liberal is merely someone who craves attention, and who uses many words to say nothing."
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,Sun reporter | September 28, 2007
Anne Catharine Green gave birth to 14 children and raised the six surviving ones with her husband in Colonial Annapolis before his untimely death thrust her into an unlikely new role: America's first female newspaper publisher. She allowed no interruption of the printing of his paper, the Maryland Gazette, announcing on the front page after his passing in 1767, according to the state archives, that she "shall venture to supply [customers] with News-Papers, on the same Terms he did." After getting complaints from William Paca about anonymous letters to the editor directed at him, she began requiring submissions to have names attached.
NEWS
October 21, 2005
Richard Hillman, a retired printing press mechanic and missionary, died of cancer Sunday at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center. The Essex resident was 75. Mr. Hillman was born in New York City and raised in Catonsville, Silver Spring and Washington, where he graduated in 1948 from Alexander Graham Bell Vocational School. From 1951 to 1953, he served in the Navy as an engine man in ships' engine rooms. In 1954, he established his business, which specialized in repairing offset printing presses.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Sun Staff | September 18, 2005
The Sun has christened its new type font Mencken, in honor of its columnist, editor and occasional torturer. Henry Louis Mencken was born 125 years ago on Sept. 12, 1880, in a little West Lexington Street rowhouse. He was the son of a cigar-making father who traded near the stage door of today's Hippodrome theater. Mencken was seven years old in 1887 when his father presented him with a small printing press and font of type on Christmas morning. Like a proud parent who wants to demonstrate a thoughtful gift, he attempted to get the press going.
NEWS
By Elaine Tassy and Elaine Tassy,SUN STAFF | May 1, 1997
Five years ago, Falco N. Benfield of Pasadena bought a used printing press through a classified ad and began working out of a friend's garage, printing restaurant menus and fliers for real estate agents.Benfield, 30, now owns a printing shop called F & S Graphics and Printing Inc. with 250 clients and a staff of five, including his wife, father and brother.And, grossing about $30,000 a month -- double what it made a year ago -- the company has outgrown its humble digs in a Millersville industrial park and is moving this summer to a larger office on Ritchie Highway in Severna Park.
NEWS
By MAGGIE GALLAGHER and MAGGIE GALLAGHER,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 24, 1995
"Sleeper Spy," by William Safire. New York: Random House. 451 pages. $24 Where James Bond led the way, almost every spy thriller has followed: At the center of every spy story is the spy, the man whom every woman wants and all men envy, an ultimate secret agent man, whose cool good looks, suave manner, superbly tailored dinner jacket, swift cars and gorgeous women put the escape in escapist fiction.Trust William Safire to pull-off the impossible: to pen a palpitating spy novel, the hero of which is not a spy at all, but a journalist and a nasty, frumpy old fellow at that.
FEATURES
By Mike Littwin | September 20, 1995
Now that the Washington Post has given over eight of its news pages to a 35,000-word treatise from the Unabomber, what's next?If we're lucky, nothing.If we're lucky, this guy was serious. He just wanted to be heard. And the next sound we hear from him will be dead silence.If we're lucky, he subscribes to the mostly discredited theory that the pen (or printing press) is mightier than the sword (or plastique).In other words, if all goes well, the Unabomber keeps his promise and won't blow up any more professors/technocrats.
FEATURES
By Mike Littwin | September 20, 1995
Now that the Washington Post has given over eight of its news pages to a 35,000-word treatise from the Unabomber, what's next?If we're lucky, nothing.If we're lucky, this guy was serious. He just wanted to be heard. And the next sound we hear from him will be dead silence.If we're lucky, he subscribes to the mostly discredited theory that the pen (or printing press) is mightier than the sword (or plastique).In other words, if all goes well, the Unabomber keeps his promise and won't blow up any more professors/technocrats.
BUSINESS
By Michael J. Himowitz | June 15, 1992
You can tell a lot about a business by the quality of the junk mail it produces.If someone tries to sell you goods or services with a flimsy flier that looks like it was printed with one of those kiddie programs that does party invitations, chances are you'll toss it in the trash without a second glance.But when someone sends you a colorful brochure, with typeset-quality printing and graphics on heavy, coated stock -- with a Rolodex punch-out -- chances are you'll at least look at it before you throw it in the trash.
BUSINESS
By Michael J. Himowitz | June 15, 1992
You can tell a lot about a business by the quality of the junk mail it produces.If someone tries to sell you goods or services with a flimsy flier that looks like it was printed with one of those kiddie programs that does party invitations, chances are you'll toss it in the trash without a second glance.But when someone sends you a colorful brochure, with typeset-quality printing and graphics on heavy, coated stock -- with a Rolodex punch-out -- chances are you'll at least look at it before you throw it in the trash.
NEWS
By Kelly Gilbert and Kelly Gilbert,Evening Sun Staff | January 17, 1992
By the time a Secret Service agent dove into the cold water at Liberty Dam on Thanksgiving weekend, most of the suspects in a $1.2 million counterfeiting case had been arrested and charged.The diver found $90,000 in counterfeit $20 bills in a plastic bag weighted down with rocks in the deep water next to the dam, and retrieved another bag containing the printing plates used to make the bogus bills.That evidence, which corroborated the stories cooperators had told, was icing on the cake."There were high-fives all around," said Assistant U.S. Attorney Maury Epner.
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