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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2014
Johns Hopkins trauma surgeon Albert Chi gave a talk last year to families about advanced prosthetics that would someday benefit their children who were missing hands. But when a parent asked what was easy, available and affordable now, Chi was at a loss. After focusing on the latest artificial limb technology, he began to hunt for more basic options. Like many researchers, entrepreneurs and even artists in recent years, he turned to the 3-D printer. With one his wife bought him for Father's Day, sheets of colored plastic, and free designs and advice found online, he made a hand for about $20. "One of the first kids we fitted was a 2-year-old," Chi said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2014
Johns Hopkins trauma surgeon Albert Chi gave a talk last year to families about advanced prosthetics that would someday benefit their children who were missing hands. But when a parent asked what was easy, available and affordable now, Chi was at a loss. After focusing on the latest artificial limb technology, he began to hunt for more basic options. Like many researchers, entrepreneurs and even artists in recent years, he turned to the 3-D printer. With one his wife bought him for Father's Day, sheets of colored plastic, and free designs and advice found online, he made a hand for about $20. "One of the first kids we fitted was a 2-year-old," Chi said.
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NEWS
By Liz F. Kay | June 8, 2011
Lots of websites and stores have gotten into the electronics trade-in and recycling game: enter your product's model number and condition online and get an estimate for how much it's worth. But Kodak's new trade-in program includes some unique categories, including consumer-grade printers, film cameras and lenses and other equipment. You have to create an account to see how much any of those old items stuck in your basement might bring you, but if you are deemed
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2014
John Danko got his Baltimore company's first 3-D printer four years ago, and he said it's given him a front-row seat for a manufacturing revolution. In an office across the street from the foundry where Danko Arlington's molten metal flows, he prints out the industrial patterns he said he could no longer find skilled workers to do by hand. Employees designing products on computers use the technology to spit out prototypes more quickly. Some see in this the potential for a change as substantial as the Industrial Revolution - a different way of making things that could kick-start tiny operations, disrupt entire industries and literally transform the landscape.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | February 17, 2005
PALO ALTO, Calif. - A week after ousting Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Carleton S. "Carly" Fiorina for failing to produce the profits she promised, Hewlett-Packard Co. reported yesterday that its fiscal first-quarter earnings were little changed. Revenue rose on holiday printer sales. Net income increased to $943 million, or 32 cents a share, from $936 million, or 30 cents, in the first quarter a year ago, HP said. Sales rose 9.9 percent to $21.5 billion from $19.51 billion, slightly beating analysts' estimates for the quarter that ended Jan. 31. HP, the world's largest printer maker and No. 2 personal-computer company, struggled to boost sales and profit as Dell Inc. became the biggest PC maker and began selling printers.
BUSINESS
By Jon Van and Jon Van,Chicago Tribune | June 3, 1991
CHICAGO -- Time was when writing a check that didn't bounce was enough, but in the electronic age, one must also worry that it won't shred or lose its magnetism as well.From the time someone writes a check until it reaches a final resting place, that piece of paper may travel through electronic scanners a dozen times or more.With each pass, the issuer's bank and account number, routing information and, in some cases, the amount of the check, are read and recorded automatically before the check passes on for more processing.
BUSINESS
By STEPHEN MANES | October 14, 1996
IF THE COMPUTER and photographic industries have their way, the world will shortly embark on a frenzy of digital picture-making.People will take snapshots with digital cameras or capture photos with scanners or ask the photofinisher for help in turning images on film into a bunch of bits. Photo software will help make Junior's overbite a trifle less pronounced, his nose a trifle less prominent. Then the pictures will whisk away to Grandma via E-mail or the personal home page.A new digital file format called Flashpix is supposed to help make all this happen quickly and easily.
FEATURES
By Amber Dance | August 16, 2007
That laser printer sitting on your desk could be emitting high levels of potentially hazardous particles, according to a study published this month. Some printers released almost as many ultra-fine particles as a smoldering cigarette, the study authors said. There have been few studies on the health hazards of printing, and the current research, appearing in the journal Environmental Science and Technology, provides the most extensive look yet at particle emissions of office printers, including Canon, Hewlett-Packard, Ricoh and Toshiba models.
BUSINESS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Evening Sun Staff | July 18, 1991
The Maryland Department of the Environment has modified its policy to allow printers to take possession of presses before they have the necessary permits to operate them.The decision was made this week after an article in The Evening Sun on Monday pointed out the plight of small printers who were finding it difficult to buy used presses because of the long waiting period for the permits.Under the federal Clean Air Act, the state must limit the quantity of volatile organic compounds -- such as gasoline vapors -- released into the air. The state requires a permit for such items as gasoline storage tanks, dry-cleaning machines, incinerators, chemical-processing equipment used by photographers, and printing presses.
BUSINESS
By Michelle Singletary and Michelle Singletary,Evening Sun Staff | July 15, 1991
David B. Baker Jr., the owner of Reese Press, agrees that Maryland should act to improve its air quality.The Baltimore area has had unhealthful levels of ground-level ozone pollution or smog on six days so far this year, making it one of the 10 smoggiest cities in the country.Breathing smog is especially hazardous to young children, the elderly and people with respiratory problems.But Baker and others in the state's printing industry do not agree with the way the state is carrying out Maryland's air quality regulations.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2014
Frank J. Antonelli, a retired Government Printing Office printer and proofreader, died March 17 of cancer at Lorien Mays Chapel and Skilled Nursing Home. He was 84. Frank Joseph Antonelli was born and raised in Brooklyn, N.Y., where he graduated from public schools. He attended Pace University. Drafted into the Army in 1950, Mr. Antonelli served with an infantry unit and participated in the successful Inchon landing in September 1950, when United Nations forces under the command of Gen. Douglas MacArthur successfully pushed North Korean forces back across the Yalu River.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | October 20, 2013
Nolen Strals is holding his head in his hand. It is gold and palm-sized, made of finely ribbed plastic. But there, unmistakably, are Strals' thoughtful brow, the pinch of his nose, smoothly sloped forehead. The bust was not crafted by a sculptor or mass-produced in a factory in China, but issued from a 3-D printer at Atomic Books. The Hampden bookstore recently became among the first places in the area where customers can walk in and get objects printed - sort of a photocopy shop for the 21st century.
NEWS
October 10, 2013
Right now there is a controversy in Washington D.C. as to whether or not we should raise the debt ceiling. I really don't see any problem with raising the existing debt ceiling, since it only stands at a modest $17 trillion, and that should be easy to pay off. Here is my plan. Let us assume that the federal government has 1,000 printers printing money, although I doubt they really have that many in service. Let's assume that those 1,000 printers are set to work printing our largest denomination of currency that is now in production - the $100 bill - and each printer can print one $100 bill per second.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | June 21, 2013
A report from the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers says Americans with tablets and smartphones spend as much time reading newspapers online as do those who still prefer the printed editions. The same is true for readers in Western Europe. The report estimates that, around the world, 2.5 billion adults read newspapers in print while more than 600 million people get their papers in digital form, and that number grows each year. Publishing has set sail for the digital universe, and one day the printed version of a newspaper, magazine or book may be strictly commemorative.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2012
The publisher of the Baltimore Jewish Times and its former printer have now blown a third deadline set by a federal judge to submit a joint plan to take the company out of bankruptcy, and the years-long feud goes on. The publisher of the Baltimore Jewish Times and the publication's former printer have missed a third deadline set by a federal judge to submit a joint plan to take the company out of bankruptcy, and the years-long feud goes on. ...
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2011
Kyle Durrie had established a decent living, handcrafting and printing wedding invitations, but truth be told, she was at the end of her creative rope. As in the cowboy songs she loves, the open road called to the resident of Portland, Ore. The life of a vagabond, however, didn't seem to jibe with that of a craft printer, whose equipment doesn't fit into a knapsack. Flying by the seat of her pants, Durrie dreamed up a way to squeeze her studio into the back of a 29-year-old van. Instead of feeding the wedding industry, she decided, she'd drive the country, spreading the gospel of letterpress printing at art shops, schools and flea markets.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dwight Silverman and Dwight Silverman,Houston Chronicle | February 28, 2000
As more and more computer peripherals are released that use a Universal Serial Bus, or USB, port, I am more and more impressed with the technology. I've sworn off using the poky serial and cantankerous parallel ports forever. So should you. As the year goes on, you'll see more computers that don't even have these "legacy" connections. There are quite a few already, including Dell Computer Corp.'s Web PC and Compaq Computer Corp.'s iPaq and Presario EZ 2200. Folks who buy these computers will need to get printers, scanners and other components that have a USB connection.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | August 16, 1998
HALF a millennium and change after Johannes Gutenberg perfected movable metal type and then veered toward bankruptcy, the printed word suffuses the economy.No soap gets marketed, no merger done, no lawsuit litigated, no news published, no home sold without the toil of Gutenberg's heirs.The audiovisual industry and Dell computers have done their maximum to stop the presses.They have failed.Literacy lives, and it lives in offset plates and ink, not just electrons and bubble-jet toner.So it is that commercial printing is still essential in the economic food chain and, like blue crabs in the Chesapeake, is a vital sign of the ecosystem.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2011
Two major advertisers in the Baltimore Jewish Times told a bankruptcy court Wednesday that they might not continue to buy space in the weekly newspaper if its ownership changes. Judge James Schneider weighed their testimony in bankruptcy proceedings against Baltimore-based Alter Communications, which publishes the nearly 100-year-old Jewish Times as well as other magazines. Alter Communications CEO Andrew Alter Buerger, who is editor and publisher of the Jewish Times, has said he would not participate in the joint ownership plan proposed by its former printer.
BUSINESS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2011
A bankruptcy court judge could decide as early as this week if the Baltimore Jewish Times will remain solely in the hands of its publisher of 92 years or be pressed into a partnership with its former printer, which it blames for much of its financial trouble. With a circulation of 8,500 and a larger audience online, the publication remains widely read in Baltimore's Jewish community, which is watching the contested bankruptcy closely. Alter Communications, which publishes the Jewish Times and several other publications, is fighting to hang onto the company through bankruptcy protection.
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