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By John Bordsen and John Bordsen,Knight-Ridder | October 8, 1995
"X-Ray: The Unauthorized Autobiography," by Ray Davies. New York: Overlook Press. 420 pages. $24.95Ray Davies of the Kinks is arguably the most literate of the songwriters who burst into prominence during pop music's mid-1960s British invasion.Here he turns to the printed page with an account of his life up to 1973. It's quirky and Mr. Davies offers startlingly candid nonfiction remembrances of Mod London. You get the inside line on a slew of Kinks classics and as the pages turn, your mental jukebox goes from song to song.
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NEWS
April 30, 2012
I get it that The Sun is no longer a Baltimore-based company but rather a part of one of America's media giants. But since the paper is still about Baltimore, I think the American League standings in the Sports section could at least express a little hometown pride. In a recent edition, for example, both the New York Yankees and Tampa Bay were listed above the Orioles, even though their stats were identical, right down to the respective teams' winning percentages. Just for the record, Toronto also had the same exact record.
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NEWS
By Owen McNally and Owen McNally,The Hartford Courant | January 4, 1998
"Echoes of a Native Land," by Serge Schmemann. Knopf. 350 pages. $27.50.Monumental historical events like the Russian Revolution can be staggeringly difficult to imagine on the printed page - unless you're reading a writer who can create the feeling of how people lived their daily lives, what they thought and held sacred, what they ate and drank, how they worked, mourned and celebrated, what they loved, loathed and feared.Serge Schmemann creates exactly this sort of stimulating ambiance in "Echoes of a Native Land," his passionate history of the estate his mother's family owned for generations before the revolution.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Sun Staff | January 21, 2007
Standing in line,waiting to check in for jury duty, I wondered which of the three people behind the counter I would rather handle this. The announcement had said they would confirm my address, employment and marital status. I got the middle-aged man. We went through the form on the computer screen. The address was correct. So was the employer. Marital status? "My wife has died," I said. The cursor moved. The M was changed to W. It moved again to the name of spouse. "Nancy" disappeared.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | January 3, 1991
Masterpiece Theatre checks in Sunday night with an extraordinary one-part, one-hour, one-woman show as Eileen Atkins plays Virginia Woolf in "A Room of One's Own."This is essentially an edited recitation of a lecture Woolf gave in 1928 at one of Cambridge's quasi-official women's colleges, though, as Alistair Cooke notes in his informative introduction, Atkins is not doing an impersonation of Woolf.While Atkins may resemble Woolf with her elongated face and the proto-Annie Hall look favored by this brightest star of the literary constellation known as the Bloomsbury Group, Cooke points out that Atkins' trained dramatic voice is much, much better than Woolf's high-pitched tremble.
FEATURES
By Newsday | October 22, 1992
Now, perhaps the greatest discovery since air conditioning first freshened a summer scorcher.Did you know some magazines offer subscriptions that come free of those scent strips?You want an unscented New Yorker? Call (800) 825-2510.A scent-free Mirabella? Dial (800) 283-0484. A New York magazine whose presence doesn't linger? (800) 678-0900.The toll-free numbers to magazines' subscription departments, located around the country, typically appear in microscopic type near the front or the back of each issue.
NEWS
By Elise Armacost | February 11, 1996
NOT LONG AGO, the discussion among members of The Sun's editorial board turned to the Information Superhighway -- specifically, to the question of whether the plain old printed page is headed for the graveyard now that you can read just about anything you want on-line.You can imagine what a serious discussion this was, given that we newspaper people are headed for job retraining if readers stop buying the plain old printed page. A few doomsayers predicted it is only a matter of time before books, newspapers and magazines become museum exhibits.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Staff Writer | November 5, 1993
Within a few years, the blind will "read" street signs and wall posters.Raymond Kurzweil didn't hedge that prediction at all when he spoke to a technology conference of the National Federation of the Blind here yesterday. And he should know. He's the man who in 1976 invented a "reader" that could scan a printed page and convert it to electronic speech -- starting a revolution in technology for the blind that hasn't stopped since.Today, an estimated 750,000 blind Americans might not be able to see the Information Age unfold, but they are hearing it and feeling it in a way that could have a profound impact on their lives.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | September 14, 1998
I've written a lot about digital photography lately because I think it's great technology. But several readers have written asking whether a scanner isn't a better deal than a digital camera.Their argument: You can always use a scanner to digitize a photograph, but you can't use a digital camera to get other kinds of printed documents in your computer. It's a good point.At the time when digital cameras are just becoming inexpensive enough for ordinary consumers to consider buying them - $600 to $800 for respectable images - the price of scanners has dropped through the floor.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | June 1, 1993
The state's official tourism slogan is: "Maryland. More than you can imagine." Yet, when it comes to funding tourism promotions, the motto could be: "Much less than we need."Neighboring states of Virginia, Pennsylvania and West Virginia annually spend millions of dollars on television spots to lure tourists. Maryland restricts its ads to the printed page -- and often those ads must piggyback on the promotion of a business or government agency."Unfortunately, we may have the will, but not the means," said R. Dean Kenderdine, assistant secretary for the Department of Economic and Employment Development.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Gerald P. Merrell and Gerald P. Merrell,SUN STAFF | August 8, 2004
John M. Kane leans back in his chair ever so slightly, and a smile sweeps across his face. "It ain't never goin' away," he says, making no effort to conceal the exhilaration that comes from knowing your future is secure. "It" is paper. Not sheets of it. Not even reams. Boxes and boxes and boxes of paper. Envision a warehouse the length of a football field and one-third as wide, with boxes covering virtually every inch of the floor and stacked three stories tall, and you get the idea.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Monty Phan and Monty Phan,NEWSDAY | April 2, 2001
You don't have to go far to find documentation on the decline of the printed encyclopedia. All you need is an Internet connection. And therein lies the problem. As the Net's popularity has risen, the public's interest in shelling out thousands of dollars for dozens of leather-bound reference books has dropped. But don't take our word for it: Check out the "Electronic encyclopaedias" entry at Britannica.com: "By the 1980s and '90s," the entry says, "the phenomenal growth of telecommunications networks and personal computer systems presented a new possibility to the publishing industry - the delivery of encyclopaedic databases through a medium other than the printed page ... "As computer technology continues to develop and is used with greater sophistication, there exists the further possibility that the electronic encyclopaedia will become less a version of the print set than a product in its own right, presenting the database in a manner best suited to exploit the advantages of the electronic medium.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Patti Hartigan and Patti Hartigan,BOSTON GLOBE | December 20, 1999
When Encyclopedia Britannica announced last month that it was offering its 32-volume set for free on the Internet, up to 15 million people flocked to the Web site, which crashed within hours and was down for days. In a single day, the site attracted more traffic than last month's star-studded Net-Aid concert and last year's Victoria's Secret fashion show combined.Why? Apparently, folks are desperate for credibility on the Internet, and the 231-year-old publisher has a reputation for reliability if not technical prowess.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | December 12, 1999
EVERY YEAR at the Maryland Technology Showcase at the Convention Center, the education folks set up a media center -- we used to call it a library -- that wraps the eye- and ear-popping wonders of electronic literacy in the warm cocoon of the book.Johann Gutenberg and Bill Gates. Books and computers. The works of Shakespeare and the solutions of BreezeCom wireless access. They used to be separate states of mind, divided physically, psychologically, financially.No longer.About 5,000 books on shelves surround technological gadgets that make the head spin.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | September 14, 1998
I've written a lot about digital photography lately because I think it's great technology. But several readers have written asking whether a scanner isn't a better deal than a digital camera.Their argument: You can always use a scanner to digitize a photograph, but you can't use a digital camera to get other kinds of printed documents in your computer. It's a good point.At the time when digital cameras are just becoming inexpensive enough for ordinary consumers to consider buying them - $600 to $800 for respectable images - the price of scanners has dropped through the floor.
NEWS
By Owen McNally and Owen McNally,The Hartford Courant | January 4, 1998
"Echoes of a Native Land," by Serge Schmemann. Knopf. 350 pages. $27.50.Monumental historical events like the Russian Revolution can be staggeringly difficult to imagine on the printed page - unless you're reading a writer who can create the feeling of how people lived their daily lives, what they thought and held sacred, what they ate and drank, how they worked, mourned and celebrated, what they loved, loathed and feared.Serge Schmemann creates exactly this sort of stimulating ambiance in "Echoes of a Native Land," his passionate history of the estate his mother's family owned for generations before the revolution.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Staff Writer | July 10, 1992
"Prelude to a Kiss" is a wonderful play that has bee transformed into a dud of a movie. And the reason that it's a dud is that the transformation was incomplete. "Prelude" is almost exactly like Craig Lucas' play, which opened off-Broadway and short Lucas (whose only previous work on film was writing "Longtime Companion") wrote his own screenplay, scarcely changing a word, and Norman Rene, who directed "Longtime Companion" and who directed "Prelude" in its stage incarnation, resumed that role for the screen.
BUSINESS
By MICHAEL J. HIMOWITZ | June 27, 1994
Time for bits and pieces, items of information that don't fall into any particular category but are still nice to know about.Neat printer tricks: I'm a sucker for software that lets you do cool things with your printer. This one came along just a few weeks before the PTA asked me to design an eight-page program for my son Ben's graduation exercises.Projects like these aren't as easy as you might think if you're using standard word processing software, because a graduation program, like any booklet, requires that you figure out which page is going where when everything gets folded over.
NEWS
By Vicki Hengen and Vicki Hengen,BOSTON GLOBE | May 26, 1996
The most recent issue of the venerable art journal Aperture (No. 142) focuses on "France: New Visions," presenting photography by 21 contemporary French artists. The magazine is always a visual feast, and this one is no exception; some of the best sequences, however, seem to cluster around the topics of love or war.Apprehending the image, and the meaning beyond it, is also the goal of a nascent publication called see, published by the Ansel Adams Center for Photography in San Francisco. A suave, handsome quarterly "journal of visual culture," it's a compendium of photographic art, criticism and essays that demands from the reader as much as it offers.
NEWS
By Elise Armacost | February 11, 1996
NOT LONG AGO, the discussion among members of The Sun's editorial board turned to the Information Superhighway -- specifically, to the question of whether the plain old printed page is headed for the graveyard now that you can read just about anything you want on-line.You can imagine what a serious discussion this was, given that we newspaper people are headed for job retraining if readers stop buying the plain old printed page. A few doomsayers predicted it is only a matter of time before books, newspapers and magazines become museum exhibits.
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